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6 month ago I purchased my first Jeep ever.... 2013 Wrangler Sport....2 door 6 speed manual....and I love it...! Since January I traveled 8000 miles all over the place. Camping, bars...road trips...chasing girls around the town...It's all around type of vehicle.Some of those trips were dirt roads in Sierra Nevada mountains...but nothing crazy or difficult.

Last week I had 4 inch Rough Country lift kit installed (with high performance 2.2 series shocks). Scraped some cash from under the mattress and added 35 inch tires with 17 inch rims ....finally it starting to look like a real Jeep.

This weekend I set out on test drive...Alabama Hills then high altitude visit of Bristlecone Pines in the White Mountain area via Silver Canyon road... 580 miles...and about 80 of them on dirt...

Here is what I noticed so far:

Ride is much more harder and rattling on the graded dirt roads. The stock was much more softer on high or low speeds. Now it seems it will rattle my brain to jello... I tried to drive fast or slow...very ruff... Only at 10m/h or less seems to be ok.
At fast speeds (~45 mi/h) rattle becomes so violent that I loose control of the Jeep...and those are simple gravel roads with some washboards... nothing crazy. I mean I had a pick up truck passing me....how embarrassing is that...

I am not an expert on off roading but I have been on some gravel roads before with stock Jeep ( before the lift) and a pick up truck...it was never so bad. WTF...?

Any ideas why...?

On the road it smooth...no rattling, no wobble...cruising at 75 mi/h like a Cadillac...
I also noticed much more attention from the girls almost immediately...

 

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How much tire pressure are you running? Should be no more then 35. Other then that, if you want that as good or better than stock ride you may have to swap out the suspension you got. Just my .02. If you like a softer ride you should look at Tera flex. Other companies make great lifts but given the way you explained your ride I would say what they offer is what you are looking for. ;)
 

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Sounds like tire pressure to me as well. Last weekend we did a trail run and had to drive a dirt road in to the staging area where we were going to air down/etc. The road in was bone jarring rough at normal pressure on my 32's (set to 32.5 cold, gets to 37-38 at temp). Dropped to 17lbs for the trail and disconnected my swaybar. The same kind of terrain/dirt road the rest of the way to the trail head was caddy smooth almost. I did notice with my lift that if I sped up a bit it actually helped, but I think that's due to the way ARB designed my shocks for those rough Outback dirt roads.
 

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Tire pressure could amount to some of the problem but he should not have to "air down" to ride on a dirt road. A lot of people do but with a decent suspension you don't have to.
 

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my first wheeling trip, i didn't air down and i felt EVERYTHING. (stock suspension)

next trip...aired down (stock suspension) and a little noticeable...not much but still noticeable.

2 months later same trip as my first wheeling trip... (upgraded coils/shocks lift kit)
aired down and it was less harsh. A very large noticeable improvement... The suspension absorbed more of the jarring hits i normally would take. Suspension components play a big role too. A bigger role than airing down tires.
 

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Tire pressure could amount to some of the problem but he should not have to "air down" to ride on a dirt road. A lot of people do but with a decent suspension you don't have to.
Yeah sorry I wasn't suggesting he air down for a simple dirt road (in my example the "road" we were on was much rougher than a typical dirt road). I was just giving an example of how tire pressure can be a big role. It's possible that the OP never checked their tire pressure since they had the new wheels & tires put on and they're set to some ridiculous pressure though. I've read countless stories of that happening around here when someone gets new tires and wonders why they're riding rough.
 

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Tire pressure is a big culprit but its odd that the highway is okay. My (then)new lift/tire combo was spine crushing until I aired down from 35 PSI (where the tire shop put it) to 28 PSI. I don't know anything about Rough Country shocks but Fox have to wear in a little. You don't see much articulation until you're off pavement- in which case the shocks may be stiff. They just need to compress/recompress some to fully seat. However you still shouldn't have "violent" shaking. This is a little different than just a harsh ride. We talking steering wheel shaking left to right? Or just an up/down bouncing/spine rattling?
 

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Probably the kind where the jeep just rides the tops and shakes ya to hell because it doesn't have the ability to deal with it. So you have to stop go very slow and no matter what speed you try to go the jeep just slides on the road shaking you to hell :banghead: I have been there not sure how you explain this situation its not death wobble, its not bumpstear its some weird miss-timing of the suspension and is like a shaking hydroplane on dirt :rolleyes: OP does this explain it?
 

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No intending to hijack the OP's thread, but would a TF 2.5" BB using Rubicon springs/shocks ride like stock and still clear 35's? I know it wouldn't flex out as well as a coil lift, but maybe this would be better suited for the OP?
 

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This weekend I set out on test drive...Alabama Hills then high altitude visit of Bristlecone Pines in the White Mountain area via Silver Canyon road... 580 miles...and about 80 of them on dirt...

Here is what I noticed so far:

Ride is much more harder and rattling on the graded dirt roads.
Sounds like you were in my old neighborhood! I grew up around Bishop and Mammoth.

Tire pressure is a good place to start, a lot of 35inch tires are perfectly happy at 28PSI. If you're we aired by a tire shop they are probably around 36 which is actually over inflated a bit.

I run 33 on the highway, 28 around town. 15-20 on dirt. You can run at 20 for short distance on the highway, won't really hurt anything, but just till you can get to some air (if you don't have on board).

The other thing to do is discconect your front swaybar endlinks (not rear!) as soon as you leave the pavement, even if you're not doing any heavy flex stuff, its going to make your life MUCH happier on washboards and all the other stuff dirt brings... Again, you can run without the front swarbars on the highway, but keep it sedate as the truck will feel quite a lot more roll. You can hook it all up as soon as you're back on level ground at a gas station or something.

If you don't have quick disconnects, just keep an 18mm socket, ratchet (or torque wrench) and an 18mm combo wrench (unless your new lift used different bolts for the endlinks, then bring what you must)... Just disconnect the lower bushing of the endlink from the axle, then use a bungey or zipstraps to secure the swaybar and the endlink up to the frame on each side so they aren't flapping around destroying your suspension or tires. (pictures easily found on google). When reconnecting, the lower bolt should be torqued to 65pounds, but if you don't have a torque wrench with you, torque them to 'damn tight' until you can get to a torque wrench. Doesn't need to be kingkong tight, just good and tight, like a lug nut. Keep the bolts in the truck with you while driving disconnected, so they don't get lost.

Those two suggestions should make a world of difference. Sorry I have never owned your lift kit so I don't know how much of the problem is built in, vs how much is air and swaybars.
 

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Easy fix...don't buy a cheap lift.
 

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I don't completely buy the cheap lift argument. The quality of the lift matters somewhat, but it's more of an issue with you drastically changing the angle of the short control arms. With the increased angle, your suspension is now going to transfer a lot more energy to the frame of the Jeep instead of through the springs and the shocks.

To fix, I highly recommend getting either the AEV drop brackets or Rancho drop brackets. They will significantly improve your ride quality.

Good luck.
 

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i don't completely buy the cheap lift argument. The quality of the lift matters somewhat, but it's more of an issue with you drastically changing the angle of the short control arms. With the increased angle, your suspension is now going to transfer a lot more energy to the frame of the jeep instead of through the springs and the shocks.

To fix, i highly recommend getting either the aev drop brackets or rancho drop brackets. They will significantly improve your ride quality.

Good luck.
x2

http://www.wranglerforum.com/f33/ranchos-control-arm-drop-brackets-261294.html
 

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I just answered basically the same question in a separate thread...what, last night? Generally, the two biggest factors in how your rig rides are the shocks and the springs. Suspension geometry, control arm bushings, track bars, tire pressure, etc. all play a role to be sure...but, your spring rate and your damping coefficient are THE key players.

The hardest thing to overcome is a spring that is too stiff - no work for the damper to do that can mitigate fully that jolt a too stiff spring is going to transmit to the frame/body over bumps and rough terrain. Alternatively, with an appropriate spring rate, an over damped shock can cause an effect that feels similar - transmitting the force of passing over micro terrain to the shock mount/frame/body rather than doing its job.

Do yourself a favor - climb into someone's rig and compare it to yours.
 

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Also, looks like you're running stock bumpers. Add 150lbs to the front and rear and you'd likely see it smooth out a bit. Most aftermarket coil springs are engineered with the assumption that you'll be running a bit more mass - it's the "rate" part of the linear, progressive, dual rate equation. Ignore that and you'll just have to settle for what you get. What did you expect from "Rough" Country? ;) Seriously, AEV, Teraflex, or stock springs with spacers will probably give you the smoothest ride. And of course, anything over 30 psi with 35x12.5x17s is asking for back spasms.
 

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I had a 4" RC lift that was on my jk when I bought it. I got the job done but it wasn't a plush ride and the rear shocks were both totally shot when I changed them out after a little over 1yr of use. I put different springs and shocks in and you'd think it was a different jeep.
 
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