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Discussion Starter #1
think i have it down to a 4" Teraflex 8-flex arm or a Iron Rock Offroad premium short arm kit, just want to see who has either and good and bad on them

thanks
 

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do you have links for the kits?

tera flex generally isnt too liked in the TJ world and they stopped developing parts about a decade ago.

the IRO arms look like they use a rubber bushing at both ends. thats generally considered a downgrade from OEM as they offer less flex and transfer the stress to the control arm mounts.

I'd keep looking.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
this is my first TJ had mostly CJ's in the past so looking for a good short arm kit thats not $3k 4" lift like to have all new arms
 

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X2.


Look for something with Johnny Joints or duraflex joints. Short to mid arm.
 

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whats the end goal? is this for looks, trail riding, rock crawling, mudding?

for a properly functioning 4" kit just the arms and SYE/CV shaft can run close to $2k

if you're trying to get some lift but not break the bank, many of us have found the zone 4.25" combo lift is a great value. paired with an MC front adj track bar and for ~$800 you have a very nice lift that can handle 33's and possibly 35's. the value of a combio kit is that since you lift the body, you can lift the engine, which lowers the rear output shaft of the TC reducing stress on the rear driveshaft ujoints. generally this kit can be run without a TC drop so the 3" spring lift gives more clearance than the budget 4" kits
 

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Discussion Starter #6
trail riding and some rocks looking to run 33 for now will be putting in a SYE and either a 8.8 or 44 in the rear and just keep the 30 in the front and build it up a little to handle a little more, my old CJ was more of a wheeler and not fun on road this will be for both kids want to ride in it so don't want to be to crazy
 

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Discussion Starter #9
ok still looking at lifts whats your thoughts on the Metalcloak 3.5" rocksport lift and the Rockkrawler 3.5" x-factor TT lift, RK looks like it comes with a drop pitman arm and rear brake line both seems to come with same style springs and all new arms
 

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The dropped pitman arm is a bad sign. Rear brake lines are unnecessary unless you are cutting and moving control arm mounts.

Have you looked at Savvy or Currie?
 

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Sometimes kits only add to the confusion. Break it down into components and what they are supposed to do. Springs, shocks, links, etc.

Springs set the ride height. Find the longest, lightest spring that will provide the ride height you need for your desired tire size. Currie 4" is great for a 33. Add a small body lift for 35s.

Shocks determine the amounts of travel and the ride quality. Finding the optimal length and appropriate valving matters far more than most realize. Shock travel should be divided 50/50 and neither half of the travel should ever be less than stock. Never sacrifice up travel. Rancho 5000x seems to be a very good inexpensive option that is valved fairly well for a TJ. Shocks are one of the most important considerations for how your Jeep will behave.

Links (control arms and track bars) define the axle position, travel arcs and pinions. The joints allow for movement and misalignment. Don't get caught up in idea that joints effect ride quality. They do not. Johnny Joints are a no nonsense, long lasting, high performing joint that do exactly what they need to do.

Currie track bars fit properly and last a long time.

Body lifts should be aluminum or nylon pucks that sit on top of the factory rubber mounts. Do not use polyurethane.

Learn how to set the bump stops by removing the coils and cycling the axles with a floor jack. Bump stops define the upper limits of the travel and prevent parts from crashing into other parts. Larger tires, longer shocks, other non-stock parts require longer bump stops.

Maintain the stock inverse-Y steering geometry. Your two options are ZJ steering and Currie. Ignore everything else. Crossover steering does not belong on stock TJ axles.

Sway bars are important for stability and control. A front Antirock is ideal. Disconnects on the factory front are just ok. The stock rear will need longer links.
 

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Another thing to consider is weight. Keep the Jeep light. Add weight as slowly as you can. Keep the clutter down. Heavy bumpers and swing away tire carriers are unnecessary. Choose bumpers and skids that are light and low profile. Design matters more than mass.
 

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Body lifts should be aluminum or nylon pucks that sit on top of the factory rubber mounts. Do not use polyurethane.

Curious if you have any recommendations. I've been considering a body lift on my TJ but 90% of the aftermarket offerings are polyurethane.
 

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Body lifts should be aluminum or nylon pucks that sit on top of the factory rubber mounts. Do not use polyurethane.

Curious if you have any recommendations. I've been considering a body lift on my TJ but 90% of the aftermarket offerings are polyurethane.
I recently switched from the very squishy JKS 1.25" that hovered just above and below 1" to the aluminum Savvy that delivers exactly as advertised. Currie is also aluminum, though I don't care for their grill supports. Nylon pucks also work well.
 

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Thank you! I apologize for sidetracking this thread a little bit and have a couple more questions. The pics below show a couple of my existing OEM body mounts. To me they look compressed and kinda donut shaped... not sure if that's how they look from the factory.

I checked out Savvy SAV-BLTJ https://savvyoffroad.com/product/sav-bltj/ and they look like what I want. Here's my question... The description states "Billet Aluminum spacers encapsulate OE body mounts for ultra-secure installation".

So... if these "encapsulate" my OE body mounts, I'm assuming that they are hollow and are a shell over the existing donut shaped mounts?
2019-08-12_09-10-13 by GhostCreekMine, on Flickr


2019-08-12_09-10-28 by GhostCreekMine, on Flickr
 

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Upon closer inspection of Savvy's item pictures... it looks like they ride on top of the OE mounts like a hat and "encapsulate" the tops of my OE mounts, is that true? If that's the case I'm not sure if my OE mounts are even worth putting a hat on, they look beat. Probably need complete OE replacements before adding the Savvy I'm guessing?
 

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Stock rubber isolaters measure one inch. Look at the rear corners between the tub and frame for a clear view. Savvy, Currie, etc sit directly on top of the rubber mount.

The most important reason a hard rigid puck is necessary is because of how the stock isolaters work. There is an internal metal structure within the stock rubber. This metal structure is what allows the two rubber halves of the isolater to securely and evenly clamp onto the frame mount, while also isolating the body from the frame.

Squishy body lifts, like the popular JKS, disrupt that ability to evenly and securely clamp the isolaters to the frame. Proper torque is impossible because the squishy puck with always compress further. The isolater will always be allowed to move and deflect more than it was designed to. This creates inconsistent loading between mounts. And it actually weakens the body/frame connection. Many of the sheet metal ripples we see on body lifted Jeeps come from squishy body lifts.

A hard rigid puck allows the stock isolaters to work as they were intended to. The result is a lifted body that is nearly identical in strength and performance as stock.

One thing I immediately noticed after changing to aluminum was that the Jeep was quieter. Many of the ambient rattles and squeaks disappeared. FWiW, the factory rubber isolaters on mine are 16 years old with about 140k miles.
 
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