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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so I am confused about lockers. If I understand properly their purpose is to make both tires function and spin at the same rate. The benefit being that it will not allow only one tire to spin while the other is not. However, I am confused about the difference in an air lockers and e-lockers. I know one is air actuated and one is electronically actuated, but what is the pros and cons of the air lockers and e-lockers? What makes on better than the other?
 

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Air lockers
Pro: you don't have electronic at the lockers or electrical wiring running to them.

Con: you have air lines which can be vulnerable to puncture and most air lockers require constant pressure to stay locked so if you lose your compressor your diffs unlock.

Electronic lockers
Pro: you don't need a compressor.

Con: possibility of electrical failure at the diff or a short along the length of the wire.


As far as I'm aware there's larger differences in the functionality of the different brands of locker that are more worth considering than the mechanism of activation
 

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One benefit to an air locker is you have a compressor to fill your tires after airing down.



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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you.

As far as I'm aware there's larger differences in the functionality of the different brands of locker that are more worth considering than the mechanism of activation
Yes, exactly. What would be some differences in the functionality that I should consider? I have looked into different brands and they (not surprisingly) all promote there own brands. I am new to Jeeps and off roading so I do not understand what they are saying when they promote there brands with the specific functionality of their locker. Any advice and info/explanation would be greatly appreciated.
 

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2003-2006 Rubicons have air lockers
2007-present Rubicons and other Wrangler trims equipped with optional rear lockers have electric lockers.

There are also selectable lockers and full time lockers.
Lockers are awesome, but not required. They are a significant investment to add them to a vehicle without them. 2007+ wranglers have Brake Lock Differential (BLD) technology that does a decent job of substituting from lockers. Wranglers before 2007 greatly benefit from the addition of lockers.
 

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Likely mentioned in the video posted, but Ox removes the need for air or electric by using a mechanical cable link.


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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all! Very helpful. What are you all's opinion which is better a selectable or Detroit locker?
 

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Selectable IMO but that’s all I have experience with....and a lunchbox which I would only use in the front.


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Ox offers all three selection types.
Yes, I was offering up they provide an alternative to air or electric. The OP asked about pros and cons of air vs electric, so it seemed good to let them know they have a third option.

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Thank you all! Very helpful. What are you all's opinion which is better a selectable or Detroit locker?
For a daily driver definately selectable. For a Jeep that goes on a trailer, a Detroit is hard to beat and was a lot more common before 2002 especially on YJ and CJ rigs. This is the kind of dumb stuff you can do with lockers. There is a reason the Rubicon badge on the hood goes for a premium. If you do this kind of stuff a lot, the Jeep really needs to be a second vehicle though.
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ARB claims that when their lockers lock they lock in the strongest position possible but claim electric lockers could lock in a weaker position.

That said I haven’t heard about e lockers breaking.


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First time I’ve heard that, as far as I know the pins are either in or they’re not.
 

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Ox offers all three selection types.

I run my OX lockers off air that is shifted with a fork. If a o ring ever goes bad all i have to do is remove the cover to replace it. ARB's have o rings inside the carrier so if one goes bad you have to pull the carrier to fix it. And with an OX locker if your air system goes down on a trail you can put a $25 drive away lock in it to lock the carrier to get off the trail until you can make proper repairs. I love my OX lockers they are the best way to go and i run mine of $20 MAC valves and a $50 viair compressor.
 

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I have Detroit auto lockers front and back. My Jeep gets alot of street use and I hardly know the are there.
With that user name I would have thought different?just kidding.I don’t know much about those, do they act differently than a lunchbox on pavement?


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What would be some differences in the functionality that I should consider?
That's more complex than I can type and honestly I have a hard time remembering the specifics off the top of my head. It comes down to the robustness of the internal design of both the locking mechanism and the actuation mechanism. I've heard bad things about ARBs actuator being a weak point. From what I've seen it looks like Ox is the most bulletproof design, I just can't decide whether I want cable, air, or electronic activation.
 

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With that user name I would have thought different?
just kidding.
I don’t know much about those, do they act differently than a lunchbox on pavement?



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With that user name I would have thought different?
just kidding.
I don’t know much about those, do they act differently than a lunchbox on paveme


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[/QUOTE
With that user name I would have thought different?just kidding.I don’t know much about those, do they act differently than a lunchbox on pavement?


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They work great for me. Not being very knowledgeable when looking at lockers I had alot of people telling me how much I would hate lunchbox or auto lockers on the street. This has been no big deal for me. I live in North Ga very curvy and hilly terrain and I have had no issues with these lockers impeding my street driving. They are dependable, strong and always work not to mention affordable.
I have no experience in snow or ice but am told if you do alot of that driving a selectable would be preferable. Here in Ga we only get maybee a few days a year were that may be an issue.
 

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That's more complex than I can type and honestly I have a hard time remembering the specifics off the top of my head. It comes down to the robustness of the internal design of both the locking mechanism and the actuation mechanism. I've heard bad things about ARBs actuator being a weak point. From what I've seen it looks like Ox is the most bulletproof design, I just can't decide whether I want cable, air, or electronic activation.

Cables stretch, electrical connections corrode and wires break. Sure you can rip an air line off but i carry an extra length of tube with me in my winching bag it wouldent take long to replace and would require no tools. I dont run a fancy onbord air system i just run a cheap Viair 90c it dont run much and when it dies i can rebuild it or just buy a new one. Air compressors dont last long mounted under the hood they are not a great idea for airing up tires with i would rather have one in a bag inside the cab to use for doing that they will last much longer.
 
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