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Rubicon lockers are plenty reliable. All the stories you hear about the failures are based on the fact that Jeep ships more lockers in Rubicon models than all other manufactures of aftermarket Jeep lockers combined and then probably some multiple of that. Jeep ships 50,000-80,000 lockers per year in the USA which would be about 55-88 million in revenue if they were all ARB lockers. ARB's entire business revenue in the United States is only 28 million dollars, and this includes OME, bumpers, diff covers, awnings, tents, refrigerators, air compressors, etc. I would imagine the diff lock portion of their business is only 10-20% of their revenue which would be 5000 lockers sold per year in the united states to a wide variety of vehicles, not just Wranglers. Let's say half the lockers are sold to Wrangler owners, and the other half to Land Cruisers, 4Runners, FJ Cruiser, pickup trucks and vintage 4x4s. 2500 lockers per year is about what is needed for one week of Rubicon production, which means every complaint on wrangler forums about ARB lockers is equivalent to 52 complaints on Rubicon lockers.
 

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It was finding a location for the switches that made me not want to need with cables, I like the idea of a physical linkage and knowing for a fact they engaged. The cable stretch issue is just one more reason I don't want them now. I had been leaning towards electric but I'll reconsider air.
I don't have any experience with electric lockers but the thought of ripping wires out of it while on the trail made me go with air. Air line is easy to fix on the trail if you have spare line but if you rip wires out of the diff i dont know how easy that is to fix.

My opinion is that the OX ran off air is the most reliable since the only o-rings to fail are in the diff cover so if an o-ring ever needs replaced you just have to pull the cover to fix it not pull the carrier which saves a ton of time and labor. And with the drive away lock you will never end up in a situation where you can not lock the differential.
 

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What did that set you back? I did my 8.8 from them and it was close to three grand but I know I don’t have to worry about it for a while, especially if I end up selling it ha ha Ha and spending the money towards the LJ.


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I dont remember i think it was something like 8k but then i had to finish the front axle from the C's out. I always wanted locking hubs though and the old school Chevy/Ford/Dodge/Jeep D44 hubs are stronger than the hub conversions for D30 knuckles and the C's are massive. And you get flat top knuckles to make setting up steering geometry much easier.

But when i was talking to ECGS they said that they would have to grind away the C's to clear the RCV shafts making them weaker. And chevy knuckles dont work with RCV's very well because they will not fit though the hole in the knuckle. So if you want to run RCV's you would need to run Ford knuckles and grind the C's apparently.

I am running Yukon Super Joints since i have lock out hubs and they wont be spinning all the time in 2wd so far so good.

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I don't have any experience with electric lockers but the thought of ripping wires out of it while on the trail made me go with air
I’ve never actually heard of that happening to anybody. The wire comes out the top of the axle housing, if wired properly non-issue, unless you got a tree branch stuck up in there somehow. I think there’s a greater chance of ripping the brake line than the e-locker connection.
 

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I’ve never actually heard of that happening to anybody. The wire comes out the top of the axle housing, if wired properly non-issue, unless you got a tree branch stuck up in there somehow. I think there’s a greater chance of ripping the brake line than the e-locker connection.
People rip air locker lines off why wouldent a wire rip off? I have had sticks run up though my floor board and bust differential actuators off my ATV's front axle that was mostly protected with a skid plate. Murphy's law. What would you rather repair on a trail?
 

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People rip air locker lines off why wouldent a wire rip off? I have had sticks run up though my floor board and bust differential actuators off my ATV's front axle that was mostly protected with a skid plate. Murphy's law. What would you rather repair on a trail?
Murphy's law would point to going with a E-Locker. Air lockers require all the switch wiring of a E locker, plus an air compressor. The final run is the air line.
 

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Murphy's law would point to going with a E-Locker. Air lockers require all the switch wiring of a E locker, plus an air compressor. The final run is the air line.
Based on Murphy's Law we should never have switched from horses then. While there is the need for an air line and compressor, the ARB Air Locker is still the locker most commonly run in major/tough events like King of the Hammers where reliability is King. Properly installed (!), ARB Air Compressors are extremely reliable. No I don't run an ARB Air Locker but I still understand their reputation for strength and reliability was earned over many years of use by competitors who can afford to run anything they want. And before anyone claims that is due to ARB sponsorships, Ox will sponsor serious competitors too but even when they're free not many choose to run Ox lockers.
 

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Murphy's law would point to going with a E-Locker. Air lockers require all the switch wiring of a E locker, plus an air compressor. The final run is the air line.
E locker dont have a drive away lock if you do rip a wire off. If they did i probably would have went with them, i did consider them.
 

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If you’re frequency ripping your locker connection air or electrical I suggest using armored cable. And I would expect you have the same problem with ripping the wheel speed sensors and brake lines.
 

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Based on Murphy's Law we should never have switched from horses then. While there is the need for an air line and compressor, the ARB Air Locker is still the locker most commonly run in major/tough events like King of the Hammers where reliability is King. Properly installed (!), ARB Air Compressors are extremely reliable. No I don't run an ARB Air Locker but I still understand their reputation for strength and reliability was earned over many years of use by competitors who can afford to run anything they want. And before anyone claims that is due to ARB sponsorships, Ox will sponsor serious competitors too but even when they're free not many choose to run Ox lockers.
King of the Hammers is a rock buggy event with all the rigs showing up on trailers and 100% of them having big beef axles with scaled up locker sizes. These are not rigs with a Dana 30 in the front and a 44 in the rear upgraded with ARB lockers. These are 1 Ton or better axles with ARB lockers orders of magnitude stronger than an ARB locker that would be able to be swapped in a stock housing. Its a no brainer to put ARBs in a rock buggy with $13,000 custom axles. The difference is not quite so much when Jeeping Joe wants lockers on his JKU sport and doesn't want any problems with them for the next 7 years. Even with king of the hammers its not so much reliability , but the strength to handle excessive horsepower and ultra low range gearing where the strength of the mechanism inside the diff is the primary concern. That is far more important than wiring/air line issues that might show up when you go over some dead fall on a national forest spur 3 years after installing the locker. I have seen plenty of people have trouble with ARB air lockers and its always the air system and never the actual locker. The ARB locker itself is stronger than the surrounding components and reliable in the sense that barely anyone breaks them (I've never seen that), but the wiring, compressor, and valve system is prone to if not failure, at least disruption in operation. Thats the trade off for the strongest locker on the market.
 

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E locker dont have a drive away lock if you do rip a wire off. If they did i probably would have went with them, i did consider them.
That's something only Ox supporters love to push and it's a pretty weak reason to believe Ox is the way to go.

And that'd be the last reason in the world I'd use to not go with an E-Locker which is another locker with an absolutely solid and sterling reputation. Route the E-Locker wiring properly so it's up out of the way and a ripped away wire will never be an issue. Routing anything properly is a simple way to avoid problems like that. Just like our brake lines, electrical wiring, etc. that run under our Jeeps.

This is a Snip of a rather well known and highly enjoyable comment by a very well known Jeep builder and developer... I attached it for its pure entertainment value. :ROFLMAO:

Ox Shortcomings.JPG
 

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King of the Hammers is a rock buggy event with all the rigs showing up on trailers and 100% of them having big beef axles with scaled up locker sizes. These are not rigs with a Dana 30 in the front and a 44 in the rear upgraded with ARB lockers. These are 1 Ton or better axles with ARB lockers orders of magnitude stronger than an ARB locker that would be able to be swapped in a stock housing. Its a no brainer to put ARBs in a rock buggy with $13,000 custom axles. The difference is not quite so much when Jeeping Joe wants lockers on his JKU sport and doesn't want any problems with them for the next 7 years. Even with king of the hammers its not so much reliability , but the strength to handle excessive horsepower and ultra low range gearing where the strength of the mechanism inside the diff is the primary concern. That is far more important than wiring/air line issues that might show up when you go over some dead fall on a national forest spur 3 years after installing the locker. I have seen plenty of people have trouble with ARB air lockers and its always the air system and never the actual locker. The ARB locker itself is stronger than the surrounding components and reliable in the sense that barely anyone breaks them (I've never seen that), but the wiring, compressor, and valve system is prone to if not failure, at least disruption in operation. Thats the trade off for the strongest locker on the market.
If a shop can't figure out how to route and install a 120 psi air line and provide a reliable source of 120 psi air they have no business trying to install ARB air locker. Some try to make it out to be something difficult, it's not. It's a simple matter of good work practices.

And I'm more than familiar with the types of vehicles competing at KOH, I've been there many years and have been on staff several times working the check points. Not all are running huge axles like you infer they are. Several buddies have competed successfully in various models of Jeeps and their axles are not what you're describing.
 

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It's a simple solution to fixing a downed locker on the tail i dont the humor in it, it's cheap and it works. I dont know if Ox cables suck i just dont like adjusting cables and not knowing if it's fully engaged or half way because the cable has stretched and needs adjusted. I have never used their servo motors so i have no idea if they are junk or not. Ox Air actuators are made by MAC that make air valves for industrial machinery they are robust and cheap when they do fail turbo guys use them for boost control.

Not hating on the E-locker i just dont want to deal with pulling a carrier if i get a branch jammed up under my jeep and pull the wires out of the diff leaving a gaping hole in the top of my axle housing. If you wheel on rocks thats unlikely to happen but if you wheel on wooded trails it's a lot more likely. I went with what made the most sense for the places i wheel.
 

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I have Detroit auto lockers front and back. My Jeep gets alot of street use and I hardly know the are there.
This. +1

I have detroits front and back. My girlfriend drives it and doesn't even notice. A Little trottle control goes a long way. It is some fun when it decides it needs to reset and makes a loud kurchunk. Passengers think the jeep blew up and I pretend not to notice lol.

Also, I started out with Aussie lockers to see if lockers are as bad as some people say. The Aussies worked fine. When I went with deeper gears I switched to detroits as well.

I have had my TJ as a daily driver for 16 years as of tomorrow it has had lockers for fifteen of those years.

I have a tera2low kit so I can disengage the front as required.

The important thing about automatic lockers is where you live. Here in south Florida there is no snow or ice to contend with. If you drive with snow and ice on the roads you will most likely need a selectable.

Or move south.
 

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Yukon makes a locker called the zip locker, in the event of a failure it fails to the locked position.
Ox now has cable, air, and electrical actuation so any of the three could fail the same if one were ripped off of the top of the axle. However the largest failure I hear of with ARB lockers is not the air line being ripped off of the housing. It is the air regulator that fails. A spare one is cheap enough and easy enough to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
I have detroits front and back. My girlfriend drives it and doesn't even notice. A Little trottle control goes a long way. It is some fun when it decides it needs to reset and makes a loud kurchunk. Passengers think the jeep blew up and I pretend not to notice lol.

Also, I started out with Aussie lockers to see if lockers are as bad as some people say. The Aussies worked fine. When I went with deeper gears I switched to detroits as well.

I have had my TJ as a daily driver for 16 years as of tomorrow it has had lockers for fifteen of those years.

I have a tera2low kit so I can disengage the front as required.

The important thing about automatic lockers is where you live. Here in south Florida there is no snow or ice to contend with. If you drive with snow and ice on the roads you will most likely need a selectable.

Or move south.
Thank you. Good to know.

Yukon makes a locker called the zip locker, in the event of a failure it fails to the locked position.
Ox now has cable, air, and electrical actuation so any of the three could fail the same if one were ripped off of the top of the axle. However the largest failure I hear of with ARB lockers is not the air line being ripped off of the housing. It is the air regulator that fails. A spare one is cheap enough and easy enough to replace.
Interesting I will look into the zip locker.
 

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That's more complex than I can type and honestly I have a hard time remembering the specifics off the top of my head. It comes down to the robustness of the internal design of both the locking mechanism and the actuation mechanism. I've heard bad things about ARBs actuator being a weak point. From what I've seen it looks like Ox is the most bulletproof design, I just can't decide whether I want cable, air, or electronic activation.
LOL must be from the OX disciples . ARBs have been used in the harshest environments for decades. There is no weak link. Ox has its problems, I ran them in my CJ when they first came out and they were a pain in the ass to keep the cables adjusted. The cable was the weak link and you had to make sure of the routing. My ARBs have been running strong in my Jeep / Buggy for over 10 years without cracking a pumpkin open. That is a HP 60 and 14 B on 42's behind a LS and Atlas . My 06 LJ Rubicon is running factory air lockers and the weak point was the overpriced compressors, replaced it with a manifold run of my CO2 tank. 140 k and no problems.
 
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