Jeep Wrangler Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I have a 2" OME lift front and rear. My problem is the rear sits about 1 1/2 "-2" higher than the front. What would be the best solution to level it out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
451 Posts
Do you have a heavy winch and/or aftermarket bumper, stinger, etc. in the front? If so, correct part of the problem with a pair of 3/4" spring spacers in front. The remaining slight downwards tilt is not a problem, it is the attitude that produces the best gas mileage at highway speeds in a TJ/LJ. If you insist upon fixing it and don't mind the 1-2mpg loss at highway speeds, then add 1.5" spring spacers in the front in place of the 3/4", or (better) add a rear bumper/tire carrier to compress the springs slightly.

Two things you should understand: 1) Every time you change the front/rear weight distribution, the front/rear springs sag a different amount, because that is the nature of coil springs. 2) You should drive the vehicle for at least 200 miles after modifying the suspension, and then measure again, the intiitial lift will reduce slightly during that period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
As an alternative to spacers, OME makes springs based on how much extra weight you've added to an area of the jeep. They're progressive rate. If you've added weight to the front or back, look at getting some that are for the weight range of your add ons.

Personally, I did spacers on top of my lift springs because my budget is almost nonexistent. Nothing at all against spacers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,952 Posts
Ok, I have a 2" OME lift front and rear. My problem is the rear sits about 1 1/2 "-2" higher than the front. What would be the best solution to level it out?
ok, there is a couple ways to think about this.

#1. The Jeep sits rear high so that when you load crap in the back, like gear, or passengers; use a hard top; and/or add a heavy tire carrier bumper with gas cans and crap, the Jeep then sits level and isn't dragging arse.

#2. the front is low because you don't have the proper spring rate on there. any bumper, winch, etc will be heavier than stock, and therefore you need to setup the spring rate and spring length appropriately to compensate.

I would recommend springs of the proper rate. You should have considered this when buying the OME springs, because they in fact have several types of springs tailored specifically for this type of thing. There are at least 4 different rate/length springs you can put up front, and 3 or 4 you could put in the back. If you buy from a good vendor, like DPG Off-Road, they will ask you questions about how you want your jeep to sit, and put the appropriate springs into your "kit".

For example, I run V8 ZJ spring in the front of my Jeep, OME PN 934, to compensate for a winch and heavy engine skid plate. The problem with just adding spacers is it doesn't solve the root of the problem - which is the spring rate and length. They also reduce the amount of space the spring has to compress into, which can lead to coil bind issues...which is why spacers require extra bumpstop extension and should not be used with lift coils (which are longer than stock).
 

·
I luv bourbonz!
Joined
·
3,104 Posts
The problem with just adding spacers is it doesn't solve the root of the problem - which is the spring rate and length. They also reduce the amount of space the spring has to compress into, which can lead to coil bind issues...which is why spacers require extra bumpstop extension and should not be used with lift coils (which are longer than stock).
I thought about this and was actually coming back to "revise" my advise.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top