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Discussion Starter #1
For the life of me I can't figure out which rust product to use and need guidance. There's a myriad of products out there and trying to sort through the BS is getting tough. Just when I think I've found the right product for my application, I find information that indicates it would be bad. So that said, my particular application is the frame. Here's a photo of the weep hole in my frame ('18 JKU with optional rust from the dealer). I got it new about 6 weeks ago and am trying to mitigate this stuff. Anyway, looking at the weep hole you can see it is blistering around the edges and I would guess that there's more inside the frame that I can't see. The stuff I can see on the outside, I can use a number of products on and have no problem with that. For the inside of the frame, I would like to use a product that has a consistency like water so that I can plug the holes and fill the frame with it to guarantee that it penetrates all areas inside. I'd like something that converts the rust rather than 'encapsulates' it.

The products I'm finding are things like Eastwood's Rust Etch which is fluid yet I read you can't leave it on. Rust converters seem to say the same thing. Leave it on and it will weaken any non rusted metal it comes into contact with.
Fluid Film is not fluid enough it would appear, and not sure if it would provide long lasting protection if I could even get it inside the frame.

I'm open to any suggestions whatsoever. I'm pretty handy with tools and have no problem buying an air pump or sprayer to get the stuff inside the frame...and as my sign off suggests, I prefer to do it myself so I know it's done right...but I just don't know which stuff to use! It's making me crazy. And it's not a case of trying one out to use - the first one that goes in the frame is going to be the only one because I won't have access to clean it out of there if it doesn't work. That said, I do have some external rust areas that I could test it on first.

I've looked at POR15, Corroseal, Eastwood's converters and encapsulators, and a bunch of others. So many that I started a list of products that were a no, and for what reason. There's no YES on that list yet. Help me find it.

As always, thanks for your input.

Mike
 

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Im going to be trying out this stuff: Mavcoat Steel Shield Industrial Grade Corrosion Protection

It sounds ok, Im still researching it, but it seems purpose built for off road applications.
 

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I was in your shoes 30 years ago trying to find the right under side coating- then I discovered waxoyl hard wax - you can get a do it yourself kit for about $130- you can seal the the under components in a hard wax.
You just have to see it. After you apply it does become a maintenance thing on your Jeep to do ever other year or so
The only place I have found in the U.S. is rovers north?
I got mine off eBay several years ago
Research waxoyl Its a good product
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys, I'm surprised there weren't more responses.

I contacted Eastwood looking for ideas and their recommendation was internal frame coating: eastwood.com/eastwood-internal-frame-coating-14oz-aerosol.html

A picture of what to expect I suppose.
 

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I've been in the same boat as you for the last year. There's so many products and methods. One guy will say XX is the best way to do it and then another guy will say YY is the best way to do it, so on and so forth. So while I have learned that there is no 'best' way to do it, I do know that mostly anything will be better than nothing.

In the next month here's what I plan to do.

1. Using a metal wire brush I'm going to scrape off all loose rust from my undercarriage

2. I'm then going to take Rustoleum Rust Reformer and apply a few coats across every rusty part. This stuff bonds with rust and chemically transforms it to a non-rusting, flat-black paintable surface and prevents future rust.

3. I am then going to take Woolwax and spray it all over my undercarriage - but I'm going to be sure to avoid certain parts such as the heat shield, exhaust, certain moving parts, etc

That's it.

I'm choosing to use Woolwax instead of Fluid Film (a very, very popular product) because they are very similar products, but Woolwax is arguably better - and here's why:

1. It contains much more raw woolgrease (lanolin). This makes Woolwax® thicker and much more resistant to wash off. Thereby providing a longer period of protection for exposed undercarriage areas.

2. Woolwax was developed to have almost no smell at all (unlike fluid film which can take weeks to air out your garage)

3. Very little over-spray because it is thicker

4. Most importantly (to me) is that it is available in clear and Black..

I prefer to get woolwax in black because then it will provide the black, glossy underbody look that everyone desires AND be a great rust protectant and the same time
 

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POR 15 paint to neutralize the rust then use Krown spray to protect it.
 
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Step 1: Wire brush the heavy and loose stuff

Step 2 is an option to using Rustoleum Rust Reformer: Spray rusty interior and exterior frame areas as best as possible with Phosphoric Acid: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Klean-Strip-1-gal-Concrete-Etch-Metal-Prep-Rust-Inhibitor-GKPA30220/100406369
Let it sit for 30-45 minutes then rinse off with hose, repeat a second time if necessary. Let completely dry before painting.

Step 3: Spray paint areas with Rustoleum Rust Reformer and let dry per instructions: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Automotive-10-25-oz-Rust-Reformer-Flat-Black-Spray-Paint-248658/202623091

Step 4: Spray paint areas with Rustoleum Satin Black paint and let dry per instructions: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Rust-Oleum-Stops-Rust-12-oz-Protective-Enamel-Satin-Black-Spray-Paint-7777830/100182541

Step 5: Cover frame with what metal protectant of your choice.

I did this with a 2001 Jeep TJ I had, and it was time and money well spent. Best of luck with your project.
 

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I've been in the same boat as you for the last year. There's so many products and methods. One guy will say XX is the best way to do it and then another guy will say YY is the best way to do it, so on and so forth. So while I have learned that there is no 'best' way to do it, I do know that mostly anything will be better than nothing.

In the next month here's what I plan to do.

1. Using a metal wire brush I'm going to scrape off all loose rust from my undercarriage

2. I'm then going to take Rustoleum Rust Reformer and apply a few coats across every rusty part. This stuff bonds with rust and chemically transforms it to a non-rusting, flat-black paintable surface and prevents future rust.

3. I am then going to take Woolwax and spray it all over my undercarriage - but I'm going to be sure to avoid certain parts such as the heat shield, exhaust, certain moving parts, etc

That's it.

I'm choosing to use Woolwax instead of Fluid Film (a very, very popular product) because they are very similar products, but Woolwax is arguably better - and here's why:

1. It contains much more raw woolgrease (lanolin). This makes Woolwax® thicker and much more resistant to wash off. Thereby providing a longer period of protection for exposed undercarriage areas.

2. Woolwax was developed to have almost no smell at all (unlike fluid film which can take weeks to air out your garage)

3. Very little over-spray because it is thicker

4. Most importantly (to me) is that it is available in clear and Black..

I prefer to get woolwax in black because then it will provide the black, glossy underbody look that everyone desires AND be a great rust protectant and the same time
The only change I would recommend is painting over the areas covered with Rustoleum Rust Reformer. Rustoleum Rust Reformer is more of a primer/rust converter and it is recommended to paint over it.
 

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Fluid Film is a great product for the inside of the frame. It creeps like crazy over time, meaning you don't have to coat every little nook & cranny inside the frame - it will 'fill in' any areas you miss. I did the inside of the doors of an old Subaru like 6-7 years ago and that stuff is still creeping! Not kidding.



The downfall of FF is longevity when used on exposed surfaces. It stays wet, and I have found that it washes off exposed surfaces fairly easily, especially if you regularly wash down your undercarriage after wheeling. Now, I use a weak dilution of car wash & water and a wheel well brush regularly on the outside of my frame, axles, etc., so maybe that has something to do with it.


I use Boeshield for exposed surfaces and have been pleasantly surprised with how well it holds up, even after washing as described above. Boeshield dries to a thin waxy film, so it doesn't wash off easily.


For heavy duty protection on exterior surfaces, use Waxoyl hard wax. I don't use it because I don't expose my Jeep to salt, but my Land Rover friends use it and it holds up very well. Touch it up as needed once a year and you're all set.
 

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I have a 2018 JKU, bought new this spring. We have a new business near me that says they specialize in this very subject. They advertise on their web site the use of "NH Oil Undercoating"....anyone ever heard of this? I'm not that interested in DIY...got way too many other things that need my DIY talents.

Here is their website: Home
Product website: https://nhoilundercoating.com/

Pricing seems pretty cheap. Wondering if YGWYPF.

Thoughts?
HJ
 

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I get all my vehicles oil undercoated at Krown once a year. I know this will help, but won't be a long term solution. When the time comes, POR-15 with a coat of uv resistant paint over top. I followed a couple of guys that did this to their 90s Ford trucks and it seemed like it really worked (even on plow/salter trucks). I'd also like to use Line-X, but it doesn't prevent rust from spreading. That means it's great on new parts or sandblasted pieces. Not so good on frames or tubing where rust could exist within a cavity.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Some great ideas coming, thanks guys much appreciated. I'm still on the fence with what exactly to do. l like the idea of FF entering the frame, but I don't know if it's fluid enough to cover the areas I need covered. POR15 won't work for me, at least inside the frame.

So far I'm leaning toward Eastwood's internal frame coating.

It would be perfect if I could find a product like Eastwood's Rust Etch by the gallon. Fill the frame up and if I could paint directly over that (ie not have to remove it before painting), then paint it, life would be good. I know I can't procrastinate for too much longer.

Some great ideas and products coming, please keep them coming.
 

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Hmmm, I like the idea of the Woolwax stuff, from what I've gathered it's a pretty new product?
 

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My son and I just did the outside of his TJ's frame (just slowing down the inevitable). We took a needle scaler and wire wheel brush to the rust. We sprayed several coats of Rustoleum Rust converter. It was super easy to work with, just spray it and let it dry. It left a nice hard coating. We then painted it with Rustoleum automotve paint. Looks great compared to the rust it was. We will see how long it lasts tho. Good luck.
 

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I would prepare it and coat the rust with POR-15. I searched by salt spray test results for the actual rustproofing product I applied. I wanted something that scored highly in salt spray test results. Applying the stuff is exactly the same, so I wanted something good that was going to last. I used Cortec VpCI-368. It's 4 years on my Liberty and going to 3 years on my Rubicon. I touch it up at oil changes, there is zero rust on both vehicles driven in the NY area where everything gets blanketed in road salt, sometimes in anticipation of snow.
 
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On my son’s LJ we cleaned the inside and outside of the frame as much as possible. Then used Eastwood’s internal frame coating. After that dried we applied fluid film inside the frame and all underneath. We also drilled drain holes in the frame to ensure water does not collect inside.

I’m a big fluid film guy. My jku, son’s LJ and my 250 all get sprayed every October. This year I’m doing it on the outside gravel pad so I don’t have to mop the garage floor. That overspray is very slippery.
 

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I have used POR15, and recommend it. Follow the instructions, works well. I'm in the northeast where salt trucks are used in the winter, plus I drive doctors and nurses into the hospital in bad weather (which means I'm driving in the salted roads).
 

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Those pics are something else... I've used Fluid Film, Eastwoods AND on my Son's Jeep - we used the Rustoleum convertor and top-coated with their Professional line of rattle can enamel which after a call to their tech line I found out that has the highest concentration of rust deterrent.
I wouldn't hesitate to go any of those routes again.
On my New JLUR I opted to topcoat with the Professional enamel again as a preemptive move.

I had no issues getting inside my frame rails with the appropriate (optional) spray applicator.

ALL three(3) companies had tech advisers that were very helpful and did not come off as simply trying to sell product which I respect and appreciate immensely.
 
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