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Hello,
I wasn't sure if I needed to put this in JK Tech or in Wheels and tires. Mods if this is the wrong spot please move, thanks,

So anyways, I had to take my left front wheel off the other day (2013 JKUR10A) to investigate some excessive squealing. Turned out to be just dirt and dried mud and rocks stuck between the rotor and the rotor shield.

So I put the wheel back on. Put some greese into the lug nutss and ran them down with my 18V Dewalt. Raised the Jeep off the jackstand, and lowered it to the ground.

I looked in my users guide and found that the proper torque is 95 foot pounds. I was expecting abit higher, since the torque for my car is 100 foot pounds. (My car = 2006 Chevy Cobalt)

Then I torqued them to 95 footpounds. I noticed that even as the torque wrench was clicking and the head was giving a little they still seemed to want to move. I made sure I was torqueing it carefully and slowly not jerking. Finnaly, I get all 5 torqued. The Useres guide said to check the torque again after 20 miles....

So 20 miles later, the nuts had worked loose some. One nut I got about 180 degrees of rotation on before the torque wrench clicked at 95 foot pounds.

That kinda scared me a little...
So after another 7 miles, I rechecked the torque. No rotation when clicking at 95 fooot pounds. I'll check again in about 14 miles to make sure.

Was the greese a bad idea? I figured it would be a preventave measure, to keep it from corroding and to keep water from getting into the threads.

Also, 95 foot pounds seems a little on the low side...

I baught my torque wrenchs about 2 years ago from Sears. They are craftsman brand and unlike the rest of my tools, I store them in the house, so that they arnt exposed to the rapid tempature and humidity changes thats in the garage. I always treat them gently and carefully, and reset them to the lowest setting when done. Though I have never had them in a calibration shop.

Have you guys found loosened nuts after 20 miles and had to retorque?
maybe 7, 000 miles ago I had the tires rotated with an oil change, and I never checked the nuts after I got home. (aprox 20 miles) and the dealership never said anything about how I SHOULD check them. When I removed my tire, it didnt feel like it was excessivly tight, and my brake rotors are not warped from an impact install.

What are your thoughts opinions?
Have you guys found loosened nuts after 20 miles and had to retorque?
maybe 7, 000 miles ago I had the tires rotated with an oil change, and I never checked the nuts after I got home. (aprox 20 miles) and the dealership never said anything about how I SHOULD check them. When I removed my tire, it didnt feel like it was excessivly tight, and my brake rotors are not warped from an impact install.
Thanks
 

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RETIRED MODERATER
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Yes, the grease is causing your issue. (This was not a good idea)!
The torque is calculated to be 95 ft. lbs. dry. This will cause the stud to stretch slighty, but at the same time seat the taper of the nut to the wheel.
So this gives you bolt stretch, and nut drag on the matting surface of the wheel, for a accurate torque!

When you put grease on them, you are not getting the correct matting surface and thread drag needed, therefore you are really over torqueing, and applying to much bolt stretch!

Normally dry, torque them down to 95 lbs. The following morning when they are cold, re-torque. After that, they should not be coming loose. If they are, then the lugs, have been over stretched, with some thread damage, and should be replaced, with new.

Go down to your local auto supply parts house, and get a can of BRAKE CLEAN. Pull your wheel and wash off the studs, nuts, and the wheel nut matting surface. This should solve your problem, but if not, then replace the studs and nuts.
Remember, this is a safety issue.....:thumb:
 

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Good post bill ^

I had a bad experience with a Craftsman torque wench. Just over a year old (kept in good shape and never dropped) it stopped working.
Iirc I was trying to tighten a bolt to 40 ft lbs. saying to myself "wtf .. This should of clicked"
Anyways ... Found the handle to loosen which also has a retaining nut inside. Googling a fix got me nowhere. The wench had to be sent out for repair. Since man others had the same issue..
I decided to throw it in with the scrap metal/parts box with the rest of the garbage :D

Check the handle. If that nut is loose and needs to not only be tightened but recalibrated. Or Toss in the trash and buy a nice CDI like i did.

Fwiw .. I run my lugs to 100 ft lbs and check torque after a few miles. Never had one loosen up totally. Will get a few to click which is normal
 

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RETIRED MODERATER
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Good post bill ^

I had a bad experience with a Craftsman torque wench. Just over a year old (kept in good shape and never dropped) it stopped working.
Iirc I was trying to tighten a bolt to 40 ft lbs. saying to myself "wtf .. This should of clicked"
Anyways ... Found the handle to loosen which also has a retaining nut inside. Googling a fix got me nowhere. The wench had to be sent out for repair. Since man others had the same issue..
I decided to throw it in with the scrap metal/parts box with the rest of the garbage :D

Check the handle. If that nut is loose and needs to not only be tightened but recalibrated. Or Toss in the trash and buy a nice CDI like i did.

Fwiw .. I run my lugs to 100 ft lbs and check torque after a few miles. Never had one loosen up totally. Will get a few to click which is normal
Thx Ken, and yes a accurate torque wrench, excellent point!!!!!
2:53 in the morning here, so headed back to bed.
Good night Ken.....:wavey:
 

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The Bad Guy
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I just want to throw another possibility out there. Make sure your wheel is fully seated on the hub. If not you can "fully tighten" a couple of lug nuts, but they will actually be loose again when you tighten the others. I have used a thin layer of white lithium grease on my lugs with no issues. I also use a HF torque wrench that has been holding up great for several years.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Remember, this is a safety issue.....:thumb:
Yes it is.
My brother was in a crash once because his lugs came off, and thus so did his wheel on US-23. He said it scared the crap out of him as his Chevy S-10 was going backwards down the freeway, until it went off the road and stopped.
Thanks for your inputs.
 

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I use very little anti sieze. And torque to 100 ftlbs. Little is the key word. To much and u have as old dogger stated.
 

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I once had a tire fall off while I was driving. I knew it was about to fall off as it made a hell of a noise and I could feel it wobbling, but I only needed to go a couple of hundred yards more to get to my destination and thought I could make it. Nope fell off and there it was following me down the road. I stopped, it hit the back of my truck and picked it up threw it in the back of my pick-up and drove on the drum to the nearest parking lot. Then found 3 of the lug nuts were still attached. The wheel had enlarged the holes during the wobbling until it passed over the loose lug nuts. Which left only two good mounting holes. Fortunately no injuries and I only drove that truck two more weeks before it ended up at the wreckers. My experience says that you know when a wheel is loose and about to fall off and you should stop immediately.

Now I routinely use an impact gun to rotate my tires and loosen them at 4 and and tighten them at 2. Pretty much like most garages do, no torque measured.

95in/lbs is not very tight, 95ft/lbs is plenty tight.

An impact gun will torque the lugs while the tire is in the air. If you use a torque wrench with the tire on the ground under load to keep it from turning then the wheel may not be perfectly seated and may need to be checked after a few miles. That would provide for some tightening as you described.

For a Jeep it is easy, throw it in 4Hi and hit the hand brake hard and torque it as best you can while the tire is in the air. Then do a final torque once it is on the ground under load.
 

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Yes it is.
My brother was in a crash once because his lugs came off, and thus so did his wheel on US-23. He said it scared the crap out of him as his Chevy S-10 was going backwards down the freeway, until it went off the road and stopped.
Thanks for your inputs.
Curious. Did your brother also grease his lugs?
 

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Also, I don't think you specified stock or aftermarket rims, but it aftermarket make sure none of the studs have the factory assembly retainer on them. Stock wheels have an indent to allow for it, but a aftermarket rim will never be flush on the hub with them there. Creates wiggle room.
 

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Yes you can use anti seize (not grease) on lug nuts! If you want to use it though you have use the proper torque for it. The torque value that is given by the MFG is for dry torquing (find the wet torque). Keep this in mind. I have used anti seize for years (24 to be exact)on lug nuts with no problems.

Go ahead and argue with me guys...... I used anti seize on rotating equipment the rotates faster that 20,000 rpms.
 

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Not a best practice to grease or lube any lug nuts. Dry and clean is the way to go. They can and will work loose if greased or lubed. I would take a can of brake clean and spray clean all the grease off the threads let dry and re- torque to spec just to be safe.

Take Care, :)
Bill G77
 
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