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Discussion Starter #1
It's not hard and is alot cheaper than buying one. Let me know what you think...

Walmart
Fabric $12.00
Velcrow strips $21.00
Fabric glue (Spray Can) $5.47

Lowe's
One 1/4" sheet 8'x4' of house insulation $11.00

Couple sheets of the kids scratch paper to make templates FREE.
Four hours of labor in the garage away from the wife PRICELESS....

Grand Total = $49.47
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Haven't really noticed a difference yet... Im moving to Alaska this Nov. and wanted to have some sort of insulation on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Directions
Supplies needed:

1. Adhesive spray (Wal-Mart)
2. Fabric (Wal-Mart)
3. Heavy duty velcro (Wal-Mart) in the spray paint section
4. 1/2" house insulation (Lowes)
Scissors, pen and scratch paper.
Step 1
Remove both front driver and passenger side hardtop pieces, place one at a time on a soft padded work bench. Grab a few sheets of regular paper. Lay the paper down on the hardtop and align the straight edge with the straight line portion of the hardtop allowing the paper to overlap the curved corners. Take a pen and trace the curved portions on the paper, cut the paper on the lines previously traced and lay them back down to check for proper alignment. If correct alignment has been achieved grab another piece of paper and tape it to your previously trimmed piece and continue the process until you end up with a full template of you first headliner.
Step 2
Take your template and lay it down on top of your insulation, keep in mind if you have a JKU a 4'x8' sheet will not leave you any room for error so measure twice and cut once. Trace your template onto the chrome looking side of the insulation, once you have completed this it is time to get your razor blade and cut out your first liner. I found it easier to use a common razor blade over a box cutter. Do not throw your template away simply flip your template over and place it on the remaining insulation, and trace out your passenger side liner. One sheet will be enough to make all liners for the JK, and the JKU.
Now for the fun part the back two liners are a bit tricky unless you feel like removing your top and flipping it over, I did not. Luckily the back two are pretty much straight lines minus two corners on each liner. Simply measure the over all dimension of your liner and cut out a piece of insulation take another piece of paper and hold it up to the corners trace your curves and apply them to your pre-measured insulation. Repeat this step once more for the rear liner JKU guys. Now you should have all of your liners cut out.
Step 3
Layout your fabric place one of your pre-cuts down on top of it, don’t forget to make sure you have the proper side of fabric that you want to show on the bottom. Mark the fabric with some chalk leaving about two inches of overlap to wrap the panel. Once you have your fabric cut spray the chrome side of your insulation with your glue and firmly place it down on your pre-cut fabric, and hold for glue to dry. Be sure there are no wrinkles in your fabric or they will show. After the glue has dried it is time to wrap your overlap around the edges of your liner. It's easier to do about a foot at a time until you get the hang of it. when you get to the corners bunch the fabric up to insure a tight and smooth corner and cut the excess off with a pair of scissors once the excess has been removed apply some more glue keep repeating these steps until your panel is complete. I applied some fabric like tape to mine to insure the glue wouldn’t fail. Repeat these steps for the remaining liners.
Step 4
You should now have all of your new liners cut and wrapped ready for the install. Grab your heavy duty velcro strips and apply them to your hardtop. The more the better I would at least use four sets on each of the front two liners to insure proper hold. Remember do not place them where they will come in contact with the fabric that wraps around on the back of the panels. They will not hold properly you want them to attach directly to the white part of the insulation for the best hold. For the back to liners I used four sets on each, again the more the better.
Step 5
Enjoy you half priced liners that truly serve a purpose, and you made yourself.
 

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Wow! Great minds think alike.

I was going to use virtually the same materials you used. My neighbor already gave me some house insulation he had left over from an addition he put on his house. I just haven't had the weather cooperate with me (no garage).

I decided to go this route after seeing the price tag of what they charge for the Hotliners.

Yours looks excellent!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just make sure your insulation is no more than 1/2", if its more your hardtop locks on the driver and passenger sides will not have the proper clearance to unlock without you ripping your liners out.
 

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Just make sure your insulation is no more than 1/2", if its more your hardtop locks on the driver and passenger sides will not have the proper clearance to unlock without you ripping your liners out.
Mine is actually a lot simpler to make. I have a solid TJ hard top. :thumb:
 

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Good job Litton! Knew it was possible, should have thought more on doing it myself. Oh well. And your frabic color choices got to be dang near unlimited too.
 

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In the winter my top drips condensation from the temp difference, heat on inside cold outside. Do you guys think this will be a problem come winter? If not I might consider doing it to, looks very professional.
 

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Thanks for the write up.

I'm doing a top insulation project myself. Using closed cell foam backpacking pads, have done the template pattern and cut foam with a large very sharp Buck.

Note on my 08JK the panels are NOT the same size, the passenger is a bit wider. Adapting the driver side was easy though with a little addition to width.

Was going to use 3" wide Velcro, but ran into adhering to foam issues.

The adhesives I was planning on using don't work, and I haven't gotten the self-sticking Velcro. Yet.

I do have some 3M 90 spray adhesive that seems to be up to the job, but I'm reconsidering whether to mount directly to the top, or via velcro strips.

Not sure whether there is advantage to having removable insulation panel.

I don't want to spray glue the foam to the roof panel and be left with regrets.

Thanks again for your write up and photos.
 

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Hey Litton, thanks for the great write-up. How are they holding up and have you noticed a difference in temperatures/noise after the installation?
 

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The adhesives I was planning on using don't work, and I haven't gotten the self-sticking Velcro. Yet.

I do have some 3M 90 spray adhesive that seems to be up to the job, but I'm reconsidering whether to mount directly to the top, or via velcro strips.

Not sure whether there is advantage to having removable insulation panel.

I don't want to spray glue the foam to the roof panel and be left with regrets.
Just a thought....It seems like silicone adhesive would be perfect for this. It holds tight, remains flexible, but if you ever do want to remove the panels it is easy to remove if you don't overdo it, and all residue is easy to just rub off.
 
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