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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, guys I just bought my first Jeep a few days ago and the first thing I did was start tearing apart the interior so I can clean it out and begin to restore it. The door hinges needed work so I decided to begin to take off the door panels but as I tried to pry off the plastic covers I ended up tearing the cardboard like product. I tossed it to the side like whatever but now I'm worried because I don't want to buy door panels that can break so easily like that especially since all the ones I can find are around $50! Does anyone know if there is a panel made of something stronger or was the panel just old and worn down? Anything helps. Thanks!
 

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You should use a puller tool made to pull the Christmas tree type fasteners out of the hole in the metal. If you pull them out of the cardboard backing it can be fixed. If the cardboard is torn use wood glue to fix it then once dry twist the plastic fasteners back into the repaired holes.
 

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You should use a puller tool made to pull the Christmas tree type fasteners out of the hole in the metal. If you pull them out of the cardboard backing it can be fixed. If the cardboard is torn use wood glue to fix it then once dry twist the plastic fasteners back into the repaired holes.
I've had hundreds of doors apart and never heard of repairing the torn out holes with wood glue.

What a great idea!

I'm thinking something like Elmers Glue or Gorilla Glue. Elmers Glue won't swell and Gorilla Glue will.
I suggest clamping the glued area between two blocks of wood and putting a piece of sheet plastic between the glued area and the block of wood.

What I have found through the years is that someone has been in there before and ripped off the plastic sheet water shield and not replaced it.
Then water gets inside the door from the small space between the outer door panel and the weatherseal at the glass then gets on the inside of the cardboard and weakens it.
Then the next guy goes in there and (not his fault) damages the door trim panel.

Agalloch07 suggests using a puller tool to slip between the door trim panel and the door shell. The puller tool has a V slot that slips over the shaft of the Christmas tree clip and then you are prying on the head of the clip, rather than the cardboard of the trim panel.
Harbor Freight has an assortment of these pullers (5 blue plastic) for $8.99. I have a set and they work just fine.

I assume you are dealing with full doors. Half doors have plastic door panels but need the same TLC or you can tear the clip out of the plastic panel also.

The new aftermarket door trim panels have the same cardboard, so I think you will be money ahead by repairing your current panels.

Before you put your repaired door panels back on, tear off all the old plastic sheeting and spray some trim adhesive (3M or similar) on the interior door shell and use some sheet plastic to create your own weather shield.
A plastic garbage bag works well for this.

Post some pics of your project.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've had hundreds of doors apart and never heard of repairing the torn out holes with wood glue.

What a great idea!

I'm thinking something like Elmers Glue or Gorilla Glue. Elmers Glue won't swell and Gorilla Glue will.
I suggest clamping the glued area between two blocks of wood and putting a piece of sheet plastic between the glued area and the block of wood.

What I have found through the years is that someone has been in there before and ripped off the plastic sheet water shield and not replaced it.
Then water gets inside the door from the small space between the outer door panel and the weatherseal at the glass then gets on the inside of the cardboard and weakens it.
Then the next guy goes in there and (not his fault) damages the door trim panel.

Agalloch07 suggests using a puller tool to slip between the door trim panel and the door shell. The puller tool has a V slot that slips over the shaft of the Christmas tree clip and then you are prying on the head of the clip, rather than the cardboard of the trim panel.
Harbor Freight has an assortment of these pullers (5 blue plastic) for $8.99. I have a set and they work just fine.

I assume you are dealing with full doors. Half doors have plastic door panels but need the same TLC or you can tear the clip out of the plastic panel also.

The new aftermarket door trim panels have the same cardboard, so I think you will be money ahead by repairing your current panels.

Before you put your repaired door panels back on, tear off all the old plastic sheeting and spray some trim adhesive (3M or similar) on the interior door shell and use some sheet plastic to create your own weather shield.
A plastic garbage bag works well for this.

Post some pics of your project.

Good Luck, L.M.
Ya the plastic sheet was torn and flaky like it had dried out that's actually another thing! how exactly do I fix that or what should I use?
 

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Ya the plastic sheet was torn and flaky like it had dried out that's actually another thing! how exactly do I fix that or what should I use?

Once you have as much of the old plastic sheeting off as is practical (you don't have to get every speck off, just the loose stuff) get a can of spray trim adhesive. 3M makes a good one or whatever is available at your big box hardware store/lumber yard.
Mask off whatever isn't covered by the trim panel. Some trim panels come up to just below the inside handles and others come up all the way to the window.
At the bottom of the inner door shell there are slots where the plastic tucks into. Mask these off so that you will be able to tuck the plastic into them and direct whatever moisture that gets inside the door away from the cardboard.

Spray a good coat of adhesive all over the area covered by the trim panel. Then, before the adhesive dries lay a sheet of plastic on top of the adhesive.
A plastic garbage bag will work or any plastic sheeting that's heavier than kitchen wrap. It'll be difficult to get the plastic sheeting on smoothly but the objective is to keep moisture off the door trim panel cardboard. One person can do the job but having an assistant help and starting at the top will make the job come out smoother. Don't forget to tuck the plastic into the slots at the bottom of the door. It's difficult to make a smooth job of it at the slots, so just consider that gravity will make the water run down hill and you want to keep any moisture from reaching the cardboard.

Once the sheeting is in place, use a razor knife or utility knife and cut away the excess. Be careful not to cut the paint.

Naturally you want to spray the adhesive with the window rolled all the way up.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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You'll probably break a bunch of the Christmas tree clips as you attempt to pull them out of the door shell.
Replacements should be available at most auto part stores (possibly a Dorman product) or certainly at an auto body supply store. Take an undamaged clip with you.
When I was in business I got a lot of hardware and body supplies from E&G Terminal in Denver. They have a website and they ship, but you may have to buy in pre-boxed quantities (25 or 50 or 100).
Quadratec or Morris 4X4 may have the clips also and they offer free shipping with a $50.00 or $75.00 purchase. I try to wait to order small items until I have enough to qualify for free shipping. The OMIX-ADA clips will work as well as the MOPAR clips. Check both sellers, prices for the clips vary widely.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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I've had hundreds of doors apart and never heard of repairing the torn out holes with wood glue.

What a great idea!
When i need to glue cardboard i use wood glue and it works really well because Cardboard=Paper=Trees=Wood. I bought complete doors from Mopar and had them painted and i had some old rotted out doors from my 84 CJ7 Renegade and i used the door panels from it and the holes in the cardboard were pretty thrashed. The wood glue has held up fine for 10+ years.


And by plastic sheet i guess you mean the one stuck to the door under the interior door panel? You could just use some heavy mil plastic and make new ones not sure if you can buy them anywhere. They just help seal out drafts
 

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You can use some of the sheet like you lay down on the rows in a garden or some like go under concrete when pouring a slab.
 

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When i need to glue cardboard i use wood glue and it works really well because Cardboard=Paper=Trees=Wood.
not sure if you can buy them anywhere.
What brand of glue do you suggest?

I don't know if any manufacturer even has a part number for weathershields.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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What brand of glue do you suggest?

I don't know if any manufacturer even has a part number for weathershields.

Good Luck, L.M.
I think i used the Elmers MAX just because it's what i had laying around. I just now noticed it says waterproof on the bottle so that probably is an added bonus... not sure of regular elmers wood glue is water proof or not.

 
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