Jeep Wrangler Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a '00 Sport and am maybe, depending on answers, wanting a little smaller antenna instead of my OE that likes to swing widly on highways and low hanging tree branches. Yay or nay? Any good ones? All I've seen are for the JK.

Thanx in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I picked up a short (maybe 14") antenna at O'Reilly's. All the stores carry them and they have different options (long, short, different appearances, etc.). They all come with various adapters to fit a wide variety of vehicles. The fit is great, I don't have any concern over it unthreading. Expect to sacrifice reception with a shorter antenna. Someone else may chime in if there's shorter options that have equivalent or better reception, though. I'd expect them to be more expensive.

I should mention I live on the outskirts of a metro area. With the stock antenna I'd say my overall reception was in the 75% range. With the short antenna it's around 50%. If you live closer to broadcast centers this may not even be an issue for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
I recently put a shorter, rubber flexible type antenna, on and the reception was bad. I got a longer black metal one, but not as long as the original, and the reception is equal to the factory one.

I don't have brands or part number, but they were both bought at Advance Auto Parts. The black metal one that works good looks like the original as far as having the spiral wire wrapped around it, but shorter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you everyone. Sounds like I might as well keep the whippy antenna. I live on the outskirts of a small town where radio reception is crap at best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I don't listen to the radio much either, but I recently cut my stock antenna down to about 13 inches with some tin snips, and used a bench grinder to clean it up and then painted it black with some Rustoleum. The Jeep is in the shop currently, so I'm not sure if it will affect reception or not, but my radio used to work halfway decently even with the antenna unplugged completely, so I'm sure it will suit my needs. Plus, it looks about 10x better, and doing it that way, I kept the stock base and I know it'll fit.

Most companies want a fortune for a stubby antenna and many of the reviews that I read stated that they don't really work well anyway, so if you're gonna do it later, I'd say go the free route and just modify your own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I only get three stations if I'm lucky; country, alternative rock, and the gospel. There's a dead zone close to home that everything goes out. No radio or internet. That's why I'm wondering if there is a better antenna out there that might give me better channels. Or if upgrading the radio would be a better choice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I only get three stations if I'm lucky; country, alternative rock, and the gospel. There's a dead zone close to home that everything goes out. No radio or internet. That's why I'm wondering if there is a better antenna out there that might give me better channels. Or if upgrading the radio would be a better choice.
It would probably be better to just get Sirius XM then, and get their base package. You could spend money on a better radio antenna and end up getting zero new channels, or maybe catching a few channels that are slightly out of range, but if they aren't channels you like, then you just wasted your money. If I lived that far out, I would definitely go the satellite route and/or just use my phone to listen to music via bluetooth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts
It would probably be better to just get Sirius XM then, and get their base package. .
X2

Once you go XM you'll never go back to annoying DJ's and 30 minutes of commercials, two songs, 30 minutes of commercials.

Then you can loose that whippy antenna altogether
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
X2

Once you go XM you'll never go back to annoying DJ's and 30 minutes of commercials, two songs, 30 minutes of commercials.

Then you can loose that whippy antenna altogether
That's a good option. There aren't a lot of stations I need. Maybe 10 at most. Getting rid of the antenna is a most viable option. Thanx to you and kirbus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
X2

Once you go XM you'll never go back to annoying DJ's and 30 minutes of commercials, two songs, 30 minutes of commercials.

Then you can loose that whippy antenna altogether
You give those things up but can start to predict song playlists on certain stations after a while. The music selection doesn't move as quickly as traditional radio.
 

·
Knows a couple things...
Joined
·
48,846 Posts
You give those things up but can start to predict song playlists on certain stations after a while. The music selection doesn't move as quickly as traditional radio.
X2. I canceled my XM subscription after noticing it repeated way too much stuff. And as Dakota said you often got to know what was going to play next. That's not good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
How it that any different than regular radio???


Because there are no DJs and commercials, the content turns over quicker. Ive been on 2 hour drives and have heard the same songs in the same order loop. Also the comedy channels start to get repetitive after a bit. On traditional radio, the songs dont loop the exact same way everyday, or if they do I cant tell because of all the other stuff going on on the radio. Satellite radio is really cool, but if you listen to it a bit then it starts to become repetitive. Not to mention the cost of Sirius XM for most vehicles. I havent tried the Jeep, but they wanted $196/year on my 11 year old Scion TC. No thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Because there are no DJs and commercials, the content turns over quicker. Ive been on 2 hour drives and have heard the same songs in the same order loop. Also the comedy channels start to get repetitive after a bit. On traditional radio, the songs dont loop the exact same way everyday, or if they do I cant tell because of all the other stuff going on on the radio. Satellite radio is really cool, but if you listen to it a bit then it starts to become repetitive. Not to mention the cost of Sirius XM for most vehicles. I havent tried the Jeep, but they wanted $196/year on my 11 year old Scion TC. No thanks.
Something to look at is price, and from what I've seen is the prices start at $11 a month for 80 channels. $131 a year. Probably more for a Jeep, but don't see how. Do you all think a better radio would be a better option for reception? Or will I still have the issues? I only ask because my husband has an upgraded stereo minus bluetooth and he gets great reception.
 

·
Knows a couple things...
Joined
·
48,846 Posts
Something to look at is price, and from what I've seen is the prices start at $11 a month for 80 channels. $131 a year. Probably more for a Jeep, but don't see how. Do you all think a better radio would be a better option for reception? Or will I still have the issues? I only ask because my husband has an upgraded stereo minus bluetooth and he gets great reception.
With the standard antenna that came on the TJ, so long as it is in good condition, there is no reason you can't get reception as good as your husband's. Perhaps just a new aftermarket radio or replacement factory (OE) antenna is needed.

OR, if you have an aftermarket radio, look through its settings for anything that mentions 'DX', 'Local', or 'Distance'. It is possible to change that setting so 'DX' (distance) is turned off which makes the radio significantly less able to pick up weak stations. Change the setting back to DX or Distance if it is set on Local.

That local setting is provided so if you're too close to a strong station and it's overloading the radio, you can decrease its sensitivity which would not ever be needed for most of us.

If it is set for Local and not Distance or DX, you'd have trouble picking up anything but strong local stations. The only radios I've had in the past 20 years that did not have those settings available were OE factory radios. Aftermarket radios all seem to have those settings available. Make sure your Local-Distance setting is set properly.

Sometimes the above described setting is buried deep in an aftermarket's menu of available settings. You might have to dig around for it.

But if you have the factory Jeep radio, it would not have the ability to change that setting and it would always stay in its most sensitive setting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,243 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
While I agree with Jerry that even satellite radio can get repetitive, terrestrial radio is just god-awful. I had Sirius XM in my car for the last 3 years and had a solid rotation of channels to flip through if one got boring/repetitive, and listened to a lot of talk radio (mostly Howard Stern). I loved it because most of the satellite stations I listened to would play new music that I'd never heard before, and then I'd download them from iTunes.

I recently gave up my subscription because I didn't want to pay for the premium channels any longer, and decided to just use my phone and bluetooth, which can also get repetitive, even when you have thousands of songs at your disposal. I love listening to music while I drive though, and it sounds like you do too, so my personal recommendation is to download as many songs as you can to your phone, and use that in conjunction with a Sirius XM free trial or base package or w/e, just to see how you like the combo. I will say that with satellite radio, you have to do a little homework and listen to each channel for at least an hour to see if they play the things you like. I know guys who listen to nothing but the Billy Joel channel or Pearl Jam channel or whatever, and pay $10-$20 a month just for that because they love every song that is played.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top