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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello from the NJ disaster area.

Its a nightmare here. No power. No gas. Downed trees everywhere so a lot of roads are closed. Cant refrigerate food, etc, you get the point

This is day 3 or 4, I cant remember anymore, But we are all pretty much homeless. Eventually the power will come back but the PSE&G people say it could be out in some areas up to 18 days.

Lines for fuel are miles long. MILES. im not kidding. I always fill up before a storm, but this is way past anything Ive seen.

Back to the point, A friends building lost power, and then had a gas leak. The police nearly kicked their door in becase the leak combined with everyone burning candles meant trouble. The Cops gave them 30 seconds to grab what they could as they were being evacuated.

I always liked the idea of a bug out bag, but I'd never seen a situation where one would be neccessary. Here it is.

who keeps a bug out bag in their truck, and what do you keep in it?
 

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First off i hope you and yours are doing ok. Everyones prayers are headed your way.

I dont keep one in my jeep for security reasons, but i have one at my house sitting by my gun safe.

Off the top of my head it contains...
6 MREs (meals ready to eat)
6 or 8 large bottles of water in side pockets
200+ ft of paracord
Small fishing kit (line, hooks, sinkers, maybe a bobber)
Change of clothes/EXTRA SOCKS
.22lr ammunition (1000 rds)
Heavy duty zip ties
Duct tape
Extensive home made first aid kit
Light/matches/magnesium firestarter
Toilet paper in sealed bag(great for fire tender)
6" fixed blade Knife
Large trash bags (double as poncho/shelter making material)
Swiss army knife
2 way radios with extra batteries

Im sure I missed some things (im not home at the moment) and i might have listed some stuff i have recently taken out for one reason or another. Remember everything in a b.o.b. Has multiple purposes. If you can only think of one purpose for it leave it out and figure out how you can meet that need with everything else because you usually can.

Hope this helped alittle
 

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My "bug out bag" is the base unit for my camping trips and I keep it on a shelf with all of my other camping supplies. I have several freeze dried food packets, a backpacking stove, 1 liter of white gas fuel, climbing rope as well as parachord, several caribeaners a folding saw, a leathman, matches, lighters, dryer lint+fire staters. This is all in a small tote. In addition I have many tents and sleeping bags at the ready along with axes and a chain saw.

Like you I always gas up before the storm but I always put a 5 gallon can of gas in my garage whether I need it to leave, to snowblow, use the chainsaw, or give it to a neighbor/friend

You are lucky you don't have to gas up in those mile long lines. I'd be conserving my fuel now if I were you
 

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I don't keep it in the jeep, but the most important items I think are:

-1 week supply emergency food (2 people)
-1 week supply emergency water (2 people)
-1 week supply emergency dog food
-lightsticks
-candles
-matches
-fire starting tools
-paracord
-ammunition
-2 week supply iodine tablets (2 people)
-ponchos
-solar blankets
-hand warmers
-1 month supply of water purification tablets
-2 dozen 123A type batteries
-flashlight
-multitool
-emergency medical kit: medicine, trauma shears, etc.

It's really now 2 bug out bags. Regular & medical.

Probably forgetting a bunch. Only thing I still need to add, but they won't quite fit, are gas masks/filters. There was recently a chemical spill not too far away & a large area was evacuated. 1m radius of people was evacuated. Those in a 5m radius were told to stay indoors (over the course of several days).


To the point, it's always good to be prepared. I've seen so many people on the news demanding help, saying they are out of food/water already. Even if one chooses to depend upon FEMA/outside help, you should be able to survive until help can reasonably arrive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You can not depend on government help.

That's one thing I've learned in this experience. Today is the first I've heard of anyone handing out water and ice and out was obviously first come first serve.

Imagine that line.

We haven't had power since Monday, you wouldn't believe the lines for fuel, this is a densely populated area. There are so many humans, i could see this situation getting violent, if we all didn't believe power and gas was on the way.

This is a good sample of what societies collapse would look like. Cut power and fuel, I'm pretty sure we`d quickly turn into animals. I had a different perception a week ago.

If this situation was any worse, i would be in real trouble. I'm realizing that I'm truly unprepared. It's an annoyance now, so don't take it as me being on my death bed, there are plenty of people in nj far worse off, but it is a sobering experience.

We drive Jeeps because we want to be ready for anything. I was not ready for this.

Preparedness is so key in these situations. A bug out bag and a plan are necessities.
 

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Shit man, my restaurant in manhattan got flooded, there still is no power, lost all food and some equipment. I never experienced anything like this in my life, good luck pieface, I hope things get better soon.
 

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Being from New Orleans I've seen many storms (an I'm only 23). I've also lived weeks with no power. But where we live everyone is kind of use to it. I couldn't imagine how people that never experienced something like that are reacting. You never realize how we depend on things till you go though it. I was you and your family the best. Good luck to everyone in that part of the country.
 

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Being from New Orleans I've seen many storms (an I'm only 23). I've also lived weeks with no power. But where we live everyone is kind of use to it.


Same here. I grew up in Lafayette.


And in reality, Sandy wasn't even a bad storm, only a Cat 1 at landfall (although it was HUGE). Whats making it seem like a horrible situation is that no one was prepared. Kinda like Katrina, it wasn't a bad storm, but the levees broke and that's what caused the major issues.
 

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My Cousin got in last night from New Jersey. His wife and kids were a bit dazed from it all. They live in a fairly nice area, pretty expensive homes in a valley between to small ranges of hills. That pretty much protected them and their home. They said coming off the hill and into town the scene totally changed. They said it looked like a war zone. Trees down everywhere, electric lines everywhere. They could see the that roads were made partially passible, but they still had to go off the road to get around some things.

My cousin said they would have been fine if they would have had a generator. That is one thing they are looking for while they are here.

Tough to find right now as people even in this are bought out stores that had generators, batteries, and flashlights, only to find out they didn't need them. In this area, we had less than 5000 without power.
 

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I live on long island very close to water. Lost our basement and 3 cars. I have friends who live right on the water who are now homeless. Ive been thinking of a bug out bag since this happened. Add a generator and a ton of gas to that list. Finding gas or a generator around here is like a life or death fight. I wish i had a 55 gal drum at least filled half way with gas. Add a syphon kit as well. My jeep is ****ed so i plan on sucking the gas out so we can keep using our generator. Power might not be back for another week. Almost every block has a power line down. Its rough out here on the island right now. This is like fall out status here
 

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Pomz623 said:
I live on long island very close to water. Lost our basement and 3 cars. I have friends who live right on the water who are now homeless. Ive been thinking of a bug out bag since this happened. Add a generator and a ton of gas to that list. Finding gas or a generator around here is like a life or death fight. I wish i had a 55 gal drum at least filled half way with gas. Add a syphon kit as well. My jeep is ****ed so i plan on sucking the gas out so we can keep using our generator. Power might not be back for another week. Almost every block has a power line down. Its rough out here on the island right now. This is like fall out status here
I'm not sure those gas caps are watertight. If the genny is out of gas then I guess running the risk of watered gas is better than nothing but be careful and know you run the risk of running water thru it. It won't hurt it per se but it won't work. If you happen to have a boat with a fuel-water separator you could plumb that into the genny's fuel line
 

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I've been thru a couple incidents where power was out for up to 15 days.....big flood, big storms, and 40 below weather for a couple weeks.

Changes your perspective for sure.

Makes a BIG difference in how we realize how close to the edge we live....which is another reason I moved to rural life style long ago.

Good luck to those stuck in the post storm disruption.

Bug-out-bags AND 'bug-IN-bags' are part of surviving comfortably or grim despair.
 

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Sorry to hear about all the difficulty that you are going through! We've been fortunate that when we've lost power for extended periods it has been early Fall / Summer meaning we didn't have the cold to deal with. I can only imagine how much more difficult the cold would make it.

Sandy turned out not to be a big deal for us but I had my wake up call when Irene came through last year and we were without power for days. Before Irene we had some very basic preparedness but I was lacking a generator. For whatever reason I hadn't put much importance on having one.

We lost power fairly early in the storm and I had a light bulb moment that I should see if I could get my hands on a generator shortly after. We headed out in the storm to the home depot, they were without power (on generator/battery for the basics), and just about to close. They had a couple generators left so I bought one. I thought finding a generator at the last minute would be the hard part. I was very wrong. Finding gas and carrying gas turned out to be the biggest challenge.

None of my vehicles had much gas in them, the home depot had zero gas cans left, and all I had at home was a 1 gallon can (half full) I used for my lawn mower. After we left the home depot I started stopping anywhere that looked like it might have gas or a gas can. We were striking out on gas everywhere but I managed to turn up a 2 more 1 gallon cans and 2 5 gallon cans.

Finally as we were about 2 miles from home the last station I checked still had power (at that moment, didn't stay that way). They were closed but the pumps worked with a card swipe. We opened the box from the generator, filled it up right from the pump, filled my cans, and my truck. and headed back home. I was fortunate it worked out as it did. With a full tank in my truck in addition to the cans and gas I put in the generator we had more than enough to last us until the power came back.

When Sandy was announced days ahead of time I dropped what I was doing, took my vehicles and filled them up, took my cans and filled them up (and picked up a few more), bought extra propane (to cook with if needed), and then kept the vehicles topped off leading right up to Sandy starting her run up the coast. I had about 120 gallons of gas on hand if I needed it. As it turned out we only lost power 5 minutes so it was for not but it was better to be ready and not need it than the other way around.

When you see how quickly it all falls apart when you don't have fuel it makes the mad max movies seem not that far fetched.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Im going to be hunting for gas today. Im down to a quarter of a tank. Maybe 60 miles left.

Then im going to be putting together my list for whats going in my bug out bags. I dont think I can fit it all in one as I'm going to be packing for 2 people.

Also going to be bringing firearms and ammo. Food. clothing. I want to be prepared to never come back if neccessary.

If this had been a bomb instead of a storm, and the grid was destroyed instead of damaged, there would be very little loving thy neighbor here. People in this area are ready to cut your throat for a parking space, I could definatly see people fighting for gas.

Is there specifics that go in a bug out bag? How to carry everything and stay light?

My girl is a ER doctor, so ill have a bag with medical supplies, food, clothing, ammo, firearms, survival kit, Do I go as far as a tent? Where is the line?
 

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PieFace:
re BugOutBag: there are tons of web sites and heavy personal opinion on what goes in them.

IMHO there are different levels of "BOB" for just the reason you mention: one bag can't possibly hold 'everything'.

I've read considerable opinions on such and found helpful hints.

A "3 day back-pack" with base needs is my own idea of "BOB 1" that you can grab & run; it should have the obvious ammo/blades/basic power bar style that keeps you alive over 3 days.

A more extensive med-kit for sure, but space/weight must be controlled.

A "3 day Jeep-pack" with more comfort items that you know makes move convenient' still compactness can provide as on a long hiking trip.

A "5-day pack" will have considerably more; take a look at what your needs are past the 3-day stark terror in the cold-dark-wet-hostile environment survival BOB you've built.

Meticulous inclusion of every little thing isn't feasible for mobility.

A decent Swiss Army knife is minimal, and there's lots of options available now that you have experience with what is/isn't REALLY necessary.

I've seen lists with provision for passport/photos/etc. That's not a BOB thing IMHO. Of course a thumb drive back up for whatever home computer storage might be beneficial next week or next month.

How big a pack can you carry, vs how small a pack can you rely on to provide the bare necessities? Will you be mounted or on foot? Alone or with someone with additional considerations? Review the basic boy scout and Army survival lists. For me, if that fits on a belt or a day-pack that's a BOB. No memorial anvil collection here.
 

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I tent camped for years, and carried all that stuff in a large back pack.
Then I moved the tent/backpack stove/cooking gear to a small box in my trunk. Carried it around there for years....then decades.

I found tarps/ground cloth more useful the last 30 years than a tent...
 
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