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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am trying to replace my oil sending unit but not having any luck finding where it is on the engine. I have read through many threads that says it is above the oil filter.

I have a 2000 TJ 4.0

Where is it here? The one I bought from the dealership doesnt look like anything here.


Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The only thing screwing into the block above the oil filter has a bracket on it, which then has a wiring connector attached.

The one I purchased looks like this.


Did someone make a crazy adapter or is it something else?
 

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My '97 TJ's oil pressure sender was external, right next to the oil filter. But I was shocked to read in my '04 Rubicon's Factory Service Manual that the oil pressure sender/switch is inside an oil lubrication journal... which sounds to me like it's now inside the engine somewhere. That is NEWS to me!
 

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My '97 TJ's oil pressure sender was external, right next to the oil filter. But I was shocked to read in my '04 Rubicon's Factory Service Manual that the oil pressure sender/switch is inside an oil lubrication journal... which sounds to me like it's now inside the engine somewhere. That is NEWS to me!
My 05 has what looks like an oil pressure sending unit sticking out the side of the block directly rearward of the oil filter.

Vince
 

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My '97 TJ's oil pressure sender was external, right next to the oil filter. But I was shocked to read in my '04 Rubicon's Factory Service Manual that the oil pressure sender/switch is inside an oil lubrication journal... which sounds to me like it's now inside the engine somewhere. That is NEWS to me!
Check your FSM Jerry, I checked mine after my last post and sure enough, like yours, mine stated the sending unit is inside an oil pressure galley.

However, a bit more reading revealed that the very first step in Lubrication Diagnostic and Testing procedure instructs you to disconnect the connector and remove the oil pressure sending unit then install a oil pressure line and gauge tool.
Seems the FSM has a bit of conflicting information.

Now, to the OP, look directly rearward of the oil filter, (your pic almost shows the location, infact, I think the wire loom in the lower left corner connects to the sender) and you should see the sending unit, simply unplug it, remove the sender and replace.


Good luck,

Vince


Edit, heres a couple of pictures, the magnetic pickup tool is resting on the boss the sending unit is threaded into.



 

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tangofox007 said:
Most reasonably, "inside an oil pressure gallery" just means that the sender is tapped into an oil gallery. Hardly an earthshaking revelation.
Lol common sense would say a device used to measure oil pressure would need to have access to oil in a pressurized area. Also it wouldn't be completely internal as it's not something any engine designer would completely internalize, due to potential failure and difficulty of replacement.
 

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Lol common sense would say a device used to measure oil pressure would need to have access to oil in a pressurized area. Also it wouldn't be completely internal as it's not something any engine designer would completely internalize, due to potential failure and difficulty of replacement.
You mean like the location of the Jeeps fuel pump?
Don't get all common sense now.
The Ford f-350 diesel has an engine repair procedure (I think it's the oil cooler replacement) which recommends removing the cab from the chassis to access. Now do you want to talk about engineers and potential failure and difficulty of replacement.
 

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Vinman said:
You mean like the location of the Jeeps fuel pump?
Don't get all common sense now.
The Ford f-350 diesel has an engine repair procedure (I think it's the oil cooler replacement) which recommends removing the cab from the chassis to access. Now do you want to talk about engineers and potential failure and difficulty of replacement.
so you're comparing a fuel tank to an engine? And a vehicle manufacturer recommendation to remove a cab from a truck to get to an engine; to how an engine designer would design an oil pressure sending unit? Compare apples to apples next time, not apples to toasters..
 

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darkproximity said:
so you're comparing a fuel tank to an engine? And a vehicle manufacturer recommendation to remove a cab from a truck to get to an engine; to how an engine designer would design an oil pressure sending unit? Compare apples to apples next time, not apples to toasters..
This
 

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so you're comparing a fuel tank to an engine? And a vehicle manufacturer recommendation to remove a cab from a truck to get to an engine; to how an engine designer would design an oil pressure sending unit? Compare apples to apples next time, not apples to toasters..
The comparison by Vinman was completely valid. A fuel pump does not have to be located inside a fuel tank any more than a sending unit has to be located inside an engine. Fact is, few vehicles are designed with easy maintenance as a top priority. I just had to remove an axle shaft from a Ford to replace an alternator. How does that fit your "common sense engineering" theory?
 

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tangofox007 said:
The comparison by Vinman was completely valid. A fuel pump does not have to be located inside a fuel tank any more than a sending unit has to be located inside an engine. Fact is, few vehicles are designed with easy maintenance as a top priority. I just had to remove an axle shaft from a Ford to replace an alternator. How does that fit your "common sense engineering" theory?
You're also comparing a fuel tank to an engine, to remove a fuel tank and pull a fuel pump out is trivial in comparison to disassembling an engine to remove a failed oil pressure sensor.

Fuel pumps are installed in tank for practical reasons, cooling and prevention of vapor lock.. What practical reason would anyone put an oil pressure sensor inside the block so the only way to remove it would be disassembly of the engine?

Lol.. Seriously get over it, you didn't understand what the manual said, don't get all butthurt because you didn't use common sense
 

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What practical reason would anyone put an oil pressure sensor inside the block so the only way to remove it would be disassembly of the engine?
Vinman's entire point, which you totally missed, is that things are frequently not designed in a practical manner. Internal water pumps are one great example.

Fuel pumps are installed in tank for practical reasons, cooling and prevention of vapor lock..
There are plenty of fuel pumps not in fuel tanks.


Lol.. Seriously get over it, you didn't understand what the manual said, don't get all butthurt because you didn't use common sense
What was it that I did not understand? Apparently, you got confused along the way about who said what. Maybe it's a PhD thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Vinman- thanks for the info and pictures. Dinner plans prevented me from checking it again last night, but I'll look again tonight. I didn't think it would be back that far based on what I was reading.
 

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Check your FSM Jerry, I checked mine after my last post and sure enough, like yours, mine stated the sending unit is inside an oil pressure galley.

However, a bit more reading revealed that the very first step in Lubrication Diagnostic and Testing procedure instructs you to disconnect the connector and remove the oil pressure sending unit then install a oil pressure line and gauge tool.
Seems the FSM has a bit of conflicting information.[/IMG]
Thanks, that makes sense. In pure disbelief of what I had read, I wanted to go out to my '04 to see for myself but I'm down with the flu so I didn't. That newer TJs like my current '04 don't use the old conventional variable resistor type of oil pressure sender like my previous '97 made it at least sound a little more plausible.

For those curious about what I read in my '04 FSM that made me doubt my sanity...

"ENGINE OIL PRESSURE

SENSOR

DESCRIPTION
The 3 wire, solid-state engine oil pressure sensor
(sending unit) is located in an engine oil pressure
gallery"
 
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