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I have a '17 JKU Rubicon that has 100% stock suspension. It has a Gobi Roof Rack, Smittybilt Atlas Rear Bumper/Tire Carrier, Rugged Ridge XHD Bumper and Smittybilt X20 Winch. In all, an easy +400 lbs of exterior weight. Plus the added things on the inside like hard top liners, seat covers, whatever. All small weight additions but it all adds up.
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Go and weigh your Jeep with and without overland gear. Full Stop.
It would be best to get the weights at each corner if you're not symmetrically loaded. Expect to add a small spacer to correct any lean as a result (and it is easier to add it before you get it all bolted back together).

At a minimum - weigh each axle.

Then select springs from there.

If the mfr cannot/will not advise springs based on these numbers, skip them - I don't care who they are or what sort of reputation they have on these forums.

Most tech support folks at the various mfrs may not want to divulge rates (which I think it BS, but that is another story) - but if you ask the questions correctly, you'll likely get an idea of which lifts will work for your weights.

From my experience, running slightly smaller tire than the 'max' tire for a given lift will allow more up travel - and greater comfort. Many of the shorter lift packages do little to improve up-travel, so bottoming/harshness while on rough terrain remains an issue. Bumpstops are usually driven by tire diameter/interference issues than by shock length/compression. Most Jeep lifts are geared towards trails/rocks and maximize down travel at the expense of uptravel.

An ideal Overland suspension would be around 50/50 or 40/60 (up/down) to improve comfort. Most Jeep lifts aren't even close to that. For example, AEV targets their suspensions towards overlanding and the standard 3.5" lift bumpstops are 3" front and rear. The 4.5" kit has 3" front with 4" rear stops. Their lifts net more than advertised and their shocks are known to be on the shorter side thereby yielding more uptravel. OME is going to say that their lifts are 2" due to Australian regulations...

I have a Frakenlift and run 2" bumps with 3" Synergy Springs F/R with a 3/4" front spacer to reduce rake (still slight rake to the front that all but disappears when loaded). I'm running Falcon 3.3 shocks designed for 3-4.5" lifts (no issues with bottoming out the shocks at full stuff). I'm also running SumoSpring progressive foam bumpers as a poor mans speedbump...I am happy with this setup and and my Jeep runs heavy - and is more heavily loaded when traveling. (IMHO, the Falcons are too heavily valved digressive - so if you go that route, get the 2DR spec shocks for your 4DR. I'll be doing this at some point in the future).


...Forgot to mention - I have been down this road (heavy & dealing with sag...). Do not underestimate the need for decent shocks. Do not under estimate shock fade - skip Rancho's or similar shock and go directly to an external res if you run heavy and like to drive at higher speeds.
 

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Forgot to mention...post this to ExpeditionPortal forum and you'll likely get some informed opinions from the Overland crowd as well. (Not to diminish those that have already posted here - the guidance provided this far has been pretty accurate.)

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Discussion Starter #23
Forgot to mention...post this to ExpeditionPortal forum and you'll likely get some informed opinions from the Overland crowd as well. (Not to diminish those that have already posted here - the guidance provided this far has been pretty accurate.)

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Thank you for the advice. I'll check out the other forum also then. Fortunately I'm not in a huge hurry so I have time to get all the information I can before spending money. I've seen some of the nicer shocks and boy does the price go up. I am planning to weigh my vehicle once I find a place so I have all the info I can before calling Dirk at DPG Offroad. Also, just saw his address and I'm only 5 1/2 hours from him. Wonder if I could pay him to do the install, lol. Might be a fun trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
So I posted to Expedition Portal - My Post and added a pic to see the sag. I also posted an updated component list w/ some optional items.

I'm going to keep up on both sites/threads because I want to be sure to have my final parts list listed for anyone who might be interested.
 

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I like the metalcloak bumpstops, they are easy to adjust even with the wheels still on the Jeep, I also use their durospring bumpstops, they don't compress as much as stock but seem to be alot better
 

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I like the metalcloak bumpstops, they are easy to adjust even with the wheels still on the Jeep, I also use their durospring bumpstops, they don't compress as much as stock but seem to be alot better
I assume the issue is the front bump stops, they are inside the front springs. That can make it tricky to change the amount of bump stop. The MetalCloak front bump stop extensions are basically like a set of stackable hockey pucks with holes in the center of them for the bolt. You have to remove the spring to drill the center hole, but once drilled you should be able to add or subtract pucks without again removing the spring. It might be a little tight getting the pucks between the coils, but it can be done. I ran the hockey pucks (two per side) for a while, since I have a friend who coaches hockey and he gave me used pucks for free.
But if you haven't drilled the center hole and just need to add a 1" bump stop extension up front you can, as mentioned, just glue a hockey puck to the top of each bump stop pad (or use double sided tape). I actually drilled the center of my hockey pucks and recessed the hole so the bolt head was below the surface of the puck. But with the current set up I am back to using TF 2.75" extensions that mount on the jounce side of the equation, plus I am running firmer poly jounces. That adds up to about 3" of extra bump stop up front.
I am running the MetalCloak rear stackable bump stop extensions, two of those stacked along with the same sort of poly jounce. Always trying to maximize the articulation....
Maybe I should try the MC jounces.
 

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I assume the issue is the front bump stops, they are inside the front springs. That can make it tricky to change the amount of bump stop. The MetalCloak front bump stop extensions are basically like a set of stackable hockey pucks with holes in the center of them for the bolt. You have to remove the spring to drill the center hole, but once drilled you should be able to add or subtract pucks without again removing the spring. It might be a little tight getting the pucks between the coils, but it can be done. I ran the hockey pucks (two per side) for a while, since I have a friend who coaches hockey and he gave me used pucks for free.
But if you haven't drilled the center hole and just need to add a 1" bump stop extension up front you can, as mentioned, just glue a hockey puck to the top of each bump stop pad (or use double sided tape). I actually drilled the center of my hockey pucks and recessed the hole so the bolt head was below the surface of the puck. But with the current set up I am back to using TF 2.75" extensions that mount on the jounce side of the equation, plus I am running firmer poly jounces. That adds up to about 3" of extra bump stop up front.
I am running the MetalCloak rear stackable bump stop extensions, two of those stacked along with the same sort of poly jounce. Always trying to maximize the articulation....
Maybe I should try the MC jounces.
Yes u have to drill for the metal cloak ones but once they are drilled u can change them without removing the spring, like u said it can be a little tight but u can jack it up to take a little tension off the spring and add or remove a puck, it can be a little tricky to get the bolt back on the bottom tho too, the hockey puck seems just as simple and cheaper, I really like the MC jounces, they seem like they will be very durable too but I've only had them on a couple months personally
 

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Yes u have to drill for the metal cloak ones but once they are drilled u can change them without removing the spring, like u said it can be a little tight but u can jack it up to take a little tension off the spring and add or remove a puck, it can be a little tricky to get the bolt back on the bottom tho too, the hockey puck seems just as simple and cheaper, I really like the MC jounces, they seem like they will be very durable too but I've only had them on a couple months personally
How hard were the MC jounces to install? The poly jounces I have now were kinda hard to get in as the material is firmer than the stock jounces.
 

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How hard were the MC jounces to install? The poly jounces I have now were kinda hard to get in as the material is firmer than the stock jounces.
I had a little trouble with the front so I just used a knife and trimmed a little around the top and used penetrating oil, I trimmed a little at a time until I could get them to fit firmly into place, the back went in with no problems
 

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MC used to carry the SumoSprings version until they did their own. No drilling with the SumoSprings... At 50% compression they provide their rated support amount and the rate climbs exponentially from there. I am very pleased with their performance.

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MC used to carry the SumoSprings version until they did their own. No drilling with the SumoSprings... At 50% compression they provide their rated support amount and the rate climbs exponentially from there. I am very pleased with their performance.

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We are talking bump stops not jounces. Jounces still require bump stops.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Well, have to admit. I'm leaning towards using hockey pucks for the fronts. As it is, my shocks are yellow and so will be my control arms and tracking bars. So, maybe I can find some yellow pucks too.
 
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