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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, the subject of tires has been covered. How about wheels?
I'm looking for something for overlanding, not necessarily rock-crawling.

I really thought that these wheels were pretty functional:https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007NNSZ7M/?tag=roadchoseme-20

I liked the fact that they were simple, but they are a 17x7 wheel.

Does anyone out there have a suggestion for a 17x8? A wheel that could take some abuse would be nice.
 

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Stock hardrocm wheels on mine. It is scuffed already so might as well use it. I've been drooling on Aev saltas but the thought of scuffing it makes me like what i have now.

I prefer my tires to not poke out too much which i get with the stock wheels.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm leaning towards the AEV wheels since I'm planning on their suspension lift. They are not as basic as the Mopar winter wheels. The Mopar would be my first choice.
 

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I normally just visit the scrap yard and get some OEM aluminum rims in the desired diameter. Picked up four 15 inchers of the Explorer recently (no they are not a good fit for Jeeps due to different backspacing) for around $100. (I did have to manually pull the old rubber off them, with an old timey tire changer, myself though).

As far as tires I prefer moderately aggressive, medium wide (12.50 section width) mud tires ( i.e. BFG) although most overlanders that I talk to seem to prefer all terrains, I suspect because they travel more over less challenging terrain..

I gave up on steel rims after used aluminum rims became cheaper than new steel rims ...never bent one so there is no need to straighten one out.

Enjoy!
 
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While I agree that the stock aluminum wheels are a great choice and probably stronger that "most" aftermarket alloy wheels, I would still say the proper choice for a hardcore serious overlander is a steel wheel. They can be repaired so much easier... Often with just a hammer.
 
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While I agree that the stock aluminum wheels are a great choice and probably stronger that "most" aftermarket alloy wheels, I would still say the proper choice for a hardcore serious overlander is a steel wheel. They can be repaired so much easier... Often with just a hammer.
Yep!...
However I have never bent a rim offroad (> 30yrs) and I have a spare...
I supposed reparability might be a concern for go-fast desert types; but given the number of times that I or my friends have damaged and repaired rims I see reparability as, maybe, a 2% issue.
This should not dissuade anyone from their wheel preferences though .. We are all different...
... Heck I don't even carry a welder and supplies anymore; must be getting old...

Enjoy!
 

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Yep!...
However I have never bent a rim offroad (> 30yrs) and I have a spare...
I supposed reparability might be a concern for go-fast desert types; but given the number of times that I or my friends have damaged and repaired rims I see reparability as, maybe, a 2% issue.
This should not dissuade anyone from their wheel preferences though .. We are all different...
... Heck I don't even carry a welder and supplies anymore; must be getting old...

Enjoy!
We're totally on the same page... The advantage of steel is that it bends and the aluminum breaks. But how often even in overland use? Not very.

Always best to have a spare though.

 
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We're totally on the same page... The advantage of steel is that it bends and the aluminum breaks. But how often even in overland use? Not very.

Always best to have a spare though.

I don't think that will repair with duct tape..........
 
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We're totally on the same page... The advantage of steel is that it bends and the aluminum breaks. But how often even in overland use? Not very.

Always best to have a spare though.

Would love to hear the story behind that pic.
 

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I have ProComps, 16x8. I had the same size on my old JK and on my teardrop too.
I went to 4WheelParts during a sale day and got them about half price.
I don't go for the fancy kinds; I'm old school.
And I'll be going back to 255/85-16 tires when my 285/75-16s wear out. Skinny gives more range.
 

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I think the repairable aspect of steel wheels is sometimes exaggerated in importance—as has been mentioned, bending a wheel is a rare occurrence. However, if you want to be able to do your own tire repairs in the field, including breaking the bead to repair a sidewall split, you can really mess up an alloy rim with a tool such as Tyrepliers. To break the bead on an alloy rim I use a Hi-Lift jack and an Extreme Outback Bead Breaker.



Along those lines, I also strongly prefer a wheel that is not too wide for the tire. The sidewall should protrude out from the wheel; to help protect it from gouges. A wheel that is too wide for the tire will make reseating a bead much, much more difficult.
 

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... Neat I may have to weld one of those up...(quickie project)

Breaking beads and pulling fence posts is about all my hi-lift has ever been good for...(gave up carrying it decades ago).

I prefer a rim width that is close to the tread width.

Enjoy!
 

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A friend and also WF member had this happen this weekend. She is not a desert go fast type... But I bet she was playing in the rocks.

 
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