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Hi All,

New to this community, not new to owning a Jeep. Anyway, I am sure that this has been asked before, but I want to repaint my Jeep-I want to save money doing it. I am going to attempt to paint my Jeep at home. I want to do it the correct way, though. This would be my first time painting a car; I need help! Can anyway help me? I don't need step by step directions from you, I just need direction to the best tutorial videos. Videos that are not convoluted, but simple, effective, and standard. Can someone provide some guidance?

My YJ has not been repainted since the day she was birthed. She is (was) forest green, but the weather and time have produced a ton of bleaching and deterioration of the paint.

Cheers,

J
 

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Thread moved from YJ Build to YJ General.

Hopefully you'll get more answers in this section. :thumb:



Glad to have you here!
Welcome to Wrangler Forum :welcome: :wavey:
 

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Welcome to the Forum jhaskins10,

You need way more information that I feel like putting into a single post.
Here's a start. Paint sticks due to two types of adhesion....You need both or the paint will peel.

1- Chemical adhesion
and
2- Mechanical adhesion.

The chemical adhesion is built into the paint by the manufacturer. There isn't much you can do about #1 except follow the directions carefully.

Number 2 is the cleaning and sanding.
Paint won't stick to grease or dirt. What I would suggest is to first, remove all the trim that you don't plan on masking. The more trim (lights, doorhandles, mouldings, bezels stripes and whatever else is on the Jeep) you remove the easier the masking will be.
Then, wash the entire vehicle with strong soap and water and rinse well.

You probably don't have a random orbit sander. If you do, you can sand the majority of the flat surfaces with 220# sandpaper. If you don't have a random orbit sander, sanding the entire surface to be painted with wet or dry 220# sandpaper. Wetsanding is easier if it isn't cold out.
If there is the slightest speck of unsanded surface, the paint will peel there sooner or later.

Modern paints mostly use a hardener. Most paint manufacturers have a good and better line of paint. Some might have a best line of paint. For an amateur, the good level of paint should work.

The hardener for the paint is extremely hazardous!!! You need a respirator. Not a dust mask, but a face mask with filters that filter out the chemicals in the paint. The store where you buy the paint should be able to set you up with a respirator.

One poster here built a spray booth in his (large) garage from PVC pipe and plastic sheeting. If weather permits, building a spray booth outside might work.

I suggest you search UTUBE for instructions about actual mixing and spraying.
Several thin coats are better than a few heavy coats.

Other posters should add to what I might not have listed here. There is tons more to know.
Many posters have done real nice home paint jobs. Just study a lot of posts and videos and take your time. Write down a set of instructions to follow, picking the points that will make you the best results.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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Thank you

Thank you for your help. I know the post is VERY ambiguous, just needed a jump start! I'll make sure I look into youtube. I am trying to do this as a bonding experience with my Father, he just doesn't know the first thing about DIY projects! ha.
 

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The prep work is the key to a good paint job. Sure spraying is important and there is a ton to learn there so watch lots of videos. I always liked Kevin Tetz. He Used to be on Trucks TV. https://www.paintucation.com/

Luckymac did this stuff professionally so every word from him is worth listening to. If you have the time and can afford to take the Jeep off the road for a while take everything apart. Even the door and hood hinges. It will be extremely hard to sand into the edges around them. If you still have factory paint everywhere and no rust you are ahead of the game. You would then just be preparing the surface for new paint. If you are getting into new panels and bodywork things will get more complicated.
 

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I'd like to add onto this thread if you don't mind, as I'm looking at a do-it-yourself paint job on my YJ as well.

My question: I'm thinking of going flat tan on mine, not glossy. My reasoning is twofold:

1. I think flat looks awesome on these Jeeps

2. I'm thinking painting error will be MUCH less apparent with flat than gloss. I'm even considering a rattle-can job!

What's the consensus of the forum brain trust on flat Vs gloss?
 

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I'd like to add onto this thread if you don't mind, as I'm looking at a do-it-yourself paint job on my YJ as well.

My question: I'm thinking of going flat tan on mine, not glossy. My reasoning is twofold:

1. I think flat looks awesome on these Jeeps

2. I'm thinking painting error will be MUCH less apparent with flat than gloss. I'm even considering a rattle-can job!

What's the consensus of the forum brain trust on flat Vs gloss?

When I restored an old Land Rover military Air Portable, I used Gillespie Coatings 686 Tan CARC Substitute mil-spec paint and I was very happy with the color. I purchased it through Rapco Parts : Rapco Paint Descriptions & Recommended Uses!!! NEW


I used a HVLP sprayer, converted a bay of the garage into a spray booth, and the paint went on very easily with a nice finish. You are correct, the flat finish hides all sorts of panel flaws. The only problem is that it can be somewhat difficult to keep clean, and if you rub the paint to try to get stuff off, it turns slightly more glossy in that area. They sell a hardener that will add a little gloss and toughness to the paint, so you may want to look into that.
 

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Just started yesterday painting my YJ with Durabak. This paint is cured by air and humidity, more humidity = faster cure time. So a friend and I started out rolling the coating on( I've done a weeks worth of prep, sanding, cleaning, taping, actual paint prep work)....... I live in Florida, it rains everyday in the Summer, 10 minutes into painting it starts raining, I do have the Jeep inside my shop but the doors are open, the paint almost immediately starts to go off, clumping, turned to a disaster. So now I have to sand down the clumps, clean and prep the whole thing over again and hope the 3/4 of a can of paint is still good. It is my fault, I should have done this indoors with less humidity. I'll post completed pictures but not of the mess I made.
 

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Painting is really time intensive. I owned a wood shop and have painted many, many items. For each hour painting, spend about 10 hours doing prep work. The painting part is very satisfying. The prep work, not so much. BUt you have to get it done to get a nice paint job.

Use a good light! hold it down against the jeep and point it parallel to the side. Look for high spots and block sand it down. Or add a little filler and bring it up. THen sand it down. As said, take everything apart. Successful painting is done on a CLEAN surface. Wet down the surface it is on before spraying.

You will get runs and have issues. Read on how to remove the runs. Or live with them.

Take your time and it will come out great.
 
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