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Evening everyone, been a lurker until I needed some advise so I finally made an account.



Goal

Mount a plow on my Jeep to make some extra cash in the winter.


Questions

How beefy do I need to make my suspension? (Does this justify a lift kit :bop:)
Should I invest in aftermarket control arms and other items to better my steering?
Front plow or rear plow? I figure rear plows may have traction issues?

Do I need more power? (Throttle body spacer, after market air intake)?
What are the disadvantages? How much will this beat up on my jeep?


I'm sure some of the older members know the following but in case you're curious,



2012, 4 Door Sahara Unlimited, 4WD, Manual. 104,000 miles and it was a Cali car until last year. Now its in the mid-west and she's in very good condition. Was well kept and has 0 rust, no engine light.



Overall I'm looking to see if its worth it, and if it is, what must I do to fully prepare my Jeep. This is my daily driver. And will continue to be. I need to keep it in best condition possible.
 

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Edit - Meant to ask if I needed steering stabilizers not controls arms lol *


Also this is the plow I'm currently looking at, note that I am interested in a small one about the width of my jeep around 70".


https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200593939_200593939


My thought is if its light enough for a 4 wheeler than it won't be terribly bad for my Jeep?
Not sure how much snow your figuring to move at a time but if it's more than a couple inches you've got your answer already.
From what I've observed watching the neighbors try to move anything between an inch and a couple feet per storm, 4wheelers are useless and anything less than a pu with ballast is nearly so.

When asked I recommend a Kubota with the tires ballasted.
Knowing the abuse my tractor has taken over the yrs plowing snow I'd never dream of doing it with my jeep.
YMMV as we got over 5' last winter.
 

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On your plow choice.....just no. You'll destroy it in about 500 yards of plowing.

Find a poly blade "real" snow plow. Everyone makes them these days. 7 or 7.5 foot. The front will dip but it will work. If you put in the longer bump stops for the front, made for plows, it'll limit the amount of drop in the front. Probably not a bad idea to lift maybe 2" spring spacers. That's not much more than the amount of "Jeep Rake" that 4 doors have, anyways. Put weight in the back of the Jeep. Mine is a Curtis. I only do my own driveway and a few neighbors. In the picture, I have 1.5" front spacer lift and 1" rear.

There's an adapter frame that gets bolted to the 8 bumper bolts and then to the sway bar bushing mounting bolts. I replaced the front 2 bushing bolts with threaded rod. I don't use the rear 2. I remove the frame after the winter to offroad. It's about the same amount of time as replacing a plastic bumper with a steel aftermarket one.
 

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I would not plow with that Jeep. Living in MI we see a lot of snow and the wear and tear on the vehicle pushing it. Plowing puts a lot of strain on the suspension, steering and the transmission. Not to mention the corrosion from the salt. If your only doing this to make a few bucks I would by a cheap 4wd pickup and and save the abuse on the Jeep. Just my .02
 

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I would not plow with that Jeep. Living in MI we see a lot of snow and the wear and tear on the vehicle pushing it. Plowing puts a lot of strain on the suspension, steering and the transmission. Not to mention the corrosion from the salt. If your only doing this to make a few bucks I would by a cheap 4wd pickup and and save the abuse on the Jeep. Just my .02
I've plowed for about 10 years, albeit not in my wrangler. Howver I was always jealous of the little wrangler doing drive-thru's and small cleanup better than my 6.5TD Dually!

Anyhow - Abuse on the vehicle is up to the driver. Use momentum, and don't hammer the Jeep. If its too deep, make a pass with the blade up first to knock half it back. Stay on top of the storms. Go easy. Very little little pedal movement. Weight in the back will help TONS, as well as balance out the weight of the plow. Good cleanup under the Jeep after each storm will go along way of preventing any more salt corrosion than simply driving in the snow already. Usually smaller plow blades are shorter as well, so you can't even try to push massive piles as it will flow right over the top.... Once the pile is formed, use the momentum of the jeep to pack it tight, not the gas pedal. It wont be a super heavy pusher, but it will surely beat a shovel and a snowblower!

Good luck. A jeep with a plow sure has its place - just make sure it knows where it is!
 

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The plow companies want everyone to have 1 ton ginormous trucks. I look back to my best friend's dad who had a 63 International Scout. They plowed from new and that thing is still my friend's backup plow today. A 2 door Wrangler maneuvers better than anything (I've plowed with a YJ and TJ before my "limo" Wranglers). Yes, you wear front end stuff. Us Jeep people seem to always be under there checking, fixing, replacing and upgrading anyways. So it gives you an excuse to upgrade sooner. :D
 

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When I lived outside of Lynchburg, Va, I had a small Ford 1210 Tractor that had about a 4' blade on it. I only used it to plow my lower drive (the road went down a hill between my upper drive (steep slope) and my lower drive (mild slope). The upper driver was all but useless in ice and snow. Nothing could go up and if you tried going down, once started nothing would stop you until you got to the level area.

I had a fried who plowed a lot of parking lots in in '76 Chevy Heavy Half 4wd PU. He left the frame for the plow on the PU year round and it was his daily driver. (This was in the mid to late '80s) He has no trouble with rust since Va did not use sodium chloride (salt) but another treatment that was more expensive but easier on the cars and roads.

One thing I noticed on the plow you referenced was the "manual angle". That may work with only doing your drive, but not for travel or parking lots. Here is a link to one plow that comes up listed for the Jeep Wranger. You select the vehicle and width and then it gives you the price with all the needed parts.

https://realtruck.com/p/k2-avalanche-snow-plow/v/jeep/wrangler/2017/?productid=1133574&gad=CK1Eqb0CEgiAIunlUZTpsxitqKv_AyCxirIS&utm_keyword=K2%20Avalanche%20Snow%20Plow&utm_source=bing&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Snow%20Plows%20-%20Shopping&utm_campaign=Snow%20Plows%20-%20Shopping&msclkid=fccf5a6b01471c8c557a076cf8e7c823&utm_term=4580359283370088&utm_content=Snow%20Plows

You may want to search other sites. Another thing you will need that I do not see on either your linked plow or the one above is the auxiliary headlights. Since the plow will block the vehicle headlights, you must mount auxiliary ones to the plow frame (not the plow) that shine over the plow.

If you are thinking about plowing parking lots, most already have contracted individuals who plow. Some are automatic if the snow fall exceeds a certain level (the ones my friend plowed were generally 4"). Some were if and when they called. He usually had to take vacation time from his day job, for if it snowed on Sunday night, he had to plow the lots in the wee hours of Monday so the lots would be somewhat clear for use when the business opened on Monday morning. To make money at it, means you are at their beck and call, it's not a week end deal.
 
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I think there are 2 schools of thought on this... if it's a legit business, you need to do a cost/benefit analysis and see what works. One result is people that buy/lease newer equipment and always have a fixed cost that they can work around. Maybe a bigger plow setup is $1000 a month. The other option is the hillbilly option, where you buy a $500 truck and a $1500 plow and label yourself a multi-national road service crew.

The hillbilly option, you are broke down half the time, wake up 1/2 the town with your POS rig, and quickly get a reputation as primarily someone that delivers drugs while plowing the driveway. The other option, you look legit, you get lots of referrals, and the next thing you know you have 5 trucks on the go.

I don't see 'daily driver' and 'mad ass snowplow' being compatible myself. That's more for a guy that needs to push his way out of his acreage to get to the highway... Heavy plowing is tough work. People that clear lots with 1/2 tons do crappy jobs, take forever, and by the 2nd snow there is no place to park because of their inability to pile.

Mind you, I live in a town that gets 10-20 feet of snow per year down low, and much more up higher.
 

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I purchased my 16 JKU RHR for pushing snow, replacing my 99 wrangler

I have a western suburbanite plow, if I recall weight 289lbs thus minimal sagging on the front end. I did add a lift and larger tires, been great the last few years.

Only complaint with the plow is that due to its light weight, it doesn’t totally scrape off all the snow on the parking lot, especially when plow is in a angle or there is a lot of snow. When the plow is in a angle, the point closest to the Jeep scrapes the parking lot clean however the other end that’s farther away, leaves 1/8-1/4 in of snow..... to me it’s the nature of the beast, not the commercial heavy duty plow

Other then that Zero issues pushing deep for Dayton Ohio snow, foot plus....

I have been using Jeep’s since the 80’s to push snow
 

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Not sure how much snow your figuring to move at a time but if it's more than a couple inches you've got your answer already.

From what I've observed watching the neighbors try to move anything between an inch and a couple feet per storm, 4wheelers are useless and anything less than a pu with ballast is nearly so.



When asked I recommend a Kubota with the tires ballasted.

Knowing the abuse my tractor has taken over the yrs plowing snow I'd never dream of doing it with my jeep.

YMMV as we got over 5' last winter.
My Foreman 500 4x4 with front diff lock moves any snow you can throw at it, as long as it hasnt gotten soft and then refrozen. If it's going to snow 2 feet I'll plow once in the middle of the storm to be safe. But guys with pickups do that too. Tell your neighbors to get chains if they have traction issues. I used to use them on my Polaris but the Honda is so heavy there is no need.

That said, I would never subject my Jeep to plow duty. But lifted vehicles with 37" tires dont make great plow trucks anyway, they are too high and the plow angle gets all screwy.
 

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I plow with a Kubota RTV in Vermont winters. It works great.


You'll spend more to maintain your Jeep and buy the plow than you'll make in 10 winters. Plowing your own place is one thing but plowing for cash is another. Standard tranny will drive you crazy . Listening to people bitch that you dug up their lawn or didn't get there soon enough will make you hate the human race. You'll either plow too much or not enough. Do you work? people won't be happy getting plowed around your schedule since snow has a schedule all it's own.

Plowing your own stuff is fun. For cash? Not so much.
 

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That said, I would never subject my Jeep to plow duty. But lifted vehicles with 37" tires dont make great plow trucks anyway, they are too high and the plow angle gets all screwy.
Wasn’t true in my case, works exactly the same before I lifted my JKU, after I lifted (rock krawler 3.5x) and used stock oem wheels/tires.... then went aftermarket wheels and 37in ridge grapplers. The shop I purchased the plow from (not a Jeep shop) suggested I lift it.

Some would never put a plow on a Jeep
Some will never take a Jeep off-road
Some will never modify a Jeep

Always thought buy what you want, use what you want and be prepared to fix it. Kinda like people who buy exotic cars and it just sits....why own it if we can’t use it.... however you want to use it.... nothing wrong with plowing snow with a Jeep. Yes not for everyone but it works... my last 99 wrangler it pushed snow from 1999 to 2015, zero trans/drivetrain issues.... prior to that used a 88 wrangler, no drivetrain issues there either, the 4.2l engine was just a local POS
 

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Wasn’t true in my case, works exactly the same before I lifted my JKU, after I lifted (rock krawler 3.5x) and used stock oem wheels/tires.... then went aftermarket wheels and 37in ridge grapplers. The shop I purchased the plow from (not a Jeep shop) suggested I lift it.



Some would never put a plow on a Jeep

Some will never take a Jeep off-road

Some will never modify a Jeep



Always thought buy what you want, use what you want and be prepared to fix it. Kinda like people who buy exotic cars and it just sits....why own it if we can’t use it.... however you want to use it.... nothing wrong with plowing snow with a Jeep. Yes not for everyone but it works... my last 99 wrangler it pushed snow from 1999 to 2015, zero trans/drivetrain issues.... prior to that used a 88 wrangler, no drivetrain issues there either, the 4.2l engine was just a local POS
To each his own. I would buy something much more heavy duty and keep it stock height if I were plowing for money. Your own driveway? Sure, why not if you dont have a quad or a tractor. That's not very much wear and tear.

My Jeep gets used, it just doesn't and will not get used for plowing professionally. I like it too much and it gets abused enough in other ways.
 

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To each his own. I would buy something much more heavy duty and keep it stock height if I were plowing for money. Your own driveway? Sure, why not if you dont have a quad or a tractor. That's not very much wear and tear.

My Jeep gets used, it just doesn't and will not get used for plowing professionally. I like it too much and it gets abused enough in other ways.
I use to own two funeral homes, downsized to one spring of 2018, so the snow removal was my parking lots. Both of which were pretty good size and I also had a tractor at each place. Early 50’s farm all cub and a late 70’s for diesel at the other place... both of which had a pull behind plow plus sitting outside in the elements for hours at each place gets old.
 

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I use to own two funeral homes, downsized to one spring of 2018, so the snow removal was my parking lots. Both of which were pretty good size and I also had a tractor at each place. Early 50’s farm all cub and a late 70’s for diesel at the other place... both of which had a pull behind plow plus sitting outside in the elements for hours at each place gets old.
Good point. Besides my Jeep with its plow, I've got a compact Kubota 4 wheel drive diesel tractor with a bucket. It's too small and slow to do my driveway. The Jeep will broadcast the snow into the woods, not just push it. I have friends with bigger tractors with cabs and snow throwers. They do unbelievably good jobs. But now we're talking $40k where the plow new on my Jeep was $4k.
 

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My Foreman 500 4x4 with front diff lock moves any snow you can throw at it, as long as it hasnt gotten soft and then refrozen. If it's going to snow 2 feet I'll plow once in the middle of the storm to be safe. But guys with pickups do that too. Tell your neighbors to get chains if they have traction issues. I used to use them on my Polaris but the Honda is so heavy there is no need.

That said, I would never subject my Jeep to plow duty. But lifted vehicles with 37" tires dont make great plow trucks anyway, they are too high and the plow angle gets all screwy.
I prefer the kubota and getting to sleep through the over night storms.
Strangely enough the wheelers with blades in the area disappeared in favor of tractors too, odd coincidence perhaps but I doubt it.

One big issue is where do you put the snow from the second storm once you've created that nice frozen berm. Not as much of an issue until the piles get 8-10' tall which you aren't going to manage with a plow.
 

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I prefer the kubota and getting to sleep
One big issue is where do you put the snow from the second storm once you've created that nice frozen berm. Not as much of an issue until the piles get 8-10' tall which you aren't going to manage with a plow.
I build snow farms in the woods with my Kubota's bucket when this happens. I do prep for "next storm" with the plow, plowing some of the snow into the woods and plowing 2-3 feet extra on each side of the pavement. I'm only doing my own property so I'm not pressed to get someplace else.
 
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