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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just trying to figure this out. . After I prime. What's the best grit sand paper to use before applying paint? Also how many coats of paint / clearcoat would you recommend? Also does anyone know anything similar to por15 that's a little cheaper?? I need to do something with my floor boards
 

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Just trying to figure this out. . After I prime. What's the best grit sand paper to use before applying paint? Also how many coats of paint / clearcoat would you recommend? Also does anyone know anything similar to por15 that's a little cheaper?? I need to do something with my floor boards
800 and wet sanding. Add a drop of detergent to the water.
 

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use 400 to 600 after prime. Remember the color coat will show any scratches after it is cured... If you think it is 100% perfect its not.... In my opinion for the purpose of por-15 their is no cheep substitute.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was thinking 3 coats of paint? Should I wet sand before clear coating ? Also ya I thought so about the Por 15. I have two leaks that keep pooling on the floor boards. Thought I had fixed that. Apparently not.
 

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3 coats is good with the first one being very,very light..unless you put the clear on immediately after the color then you need to sand it..sand your primer with 400 and your color coat with 800 or 1000
 

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Here's what I do....after primer I wetsand with 600 grit. Anything more aggressive and you are likely to see sandscratches in your base...you can do 800 no problem. 3 coats is about what it takes...but will depend on how you spray. You do NOT need to wetsand before you clear....providing you clear within the recommended window which is usally 24 hours...probably still be ok up to 48, but you do want to have the chemicals 'bond'. If you do go beyond the allowed time, you can lightly scuff...BUT if you spray a metallic, it will likely look blotchey after doing so and you will get a crappy result....

You need to keep in mind that your environment has to be suitable to spraying - clean, of course...but consistent temps! If it is going to get below 60 degrees, don't expect your clearcoat to cure...also you can tailor your reducers to your environment - if it will be 60-70, use a faster reducer....

I spray motorcycles for a living...will be happy to offer any advice I can to help you out...assuming you have a good compressor and a decent spray gun?
 
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