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I plan on doing my own oil changes and tire rotations so I wanted to get some opinions/suggestions regarding safety. I'm looking for advice on how to raise it fully off the ground, or at least 2 wheels at a time. Should I be using one or two hydrolic jacks? Or is there an inexpensive garage lift that is popular for the DIY type?

Share your insight and knowledge so I can generate some ideas on a safe way to do these things in my garage. I'm a bit leery of the old school manual jack, especially if I plan on laying underneath the Jeep.

Thanks.
 

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I jack under the diff housing, and if not working on the suspension I put jack stands under the axle tubes.
 

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Jacks are for lifting, jackstands are for holding so don't use a jack as a jackstand. Unless working on the suspension I would recommend jacking on the axle tube as close to the spring perch as possible. Also, as mentioned previously when doing a rotation I'd just have the 2 tires your swapping off the ground then reposition for the other 2.
 

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We just purchased our first, but not last 2005 Wrangler Sport. I have been looking around for a 4 inch lift kit. There are so many to choose from. What kit would you recommend for amateurs. I like the look a jeep has with the moderate 4 inch lift and 33/12.5 tires. Also while I am typing this outside of looks, can someone tell me what the difference in rim size would do with performance on the trail?

Trying to figure it out in NE Illinois!
 

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I jack under the diff housing, and if not working on the suspension I put jack stands under the axle tubes.
This method is not suggested by my 2013 Jeep manual. As a matter of fact it says DON'T jack anywhere other than the locations that they recommend. Those locations happen to be near the spring perches on the axle tubes.

CAUTION!
Do not attempt to raise the vehicle by jacking on
locations other than those indicated in the Jacking
Instructions for this vehicle.

Unless you have some kind of aftermarket axle or truss installed it could damage the tube/differential housing connection.
 

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I am paranoid as I have been to 3 incidents of vehicles falling on people working underneath them... 2 of them were within a week of each other and both of those were in the presence of the victim's kids. So, I am fortunate to have access to large chunks of dimensional wood and use 10" square blocks, 2 feet long, and use them to block if I ever have 2 wheels up and need to go underneath. If I have just one wheel up, I will use a jack stand or if I am just flipping tires I will use jackstands.

One fellow expired trying to tell his wife how to operate the jack... how fun a way is that to go?
 

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I prefer jacking it up and using railroad ties to support it while doing a quick rotate. You can usually find them cheap and notch them to have a place for the axle to rest. It only needs to be an inch above the ground to rotate them anyhow.

You shouldn't need to jack it up to change the oil unless you are a bit bigger. In saying this, I used to be able to slide a 5 gallon bucket under the TJ while it sat on the driveway. I don't think I can do that with the JK, it looks like it hangs a lot lower underneath. However, it should be easy enough to get to with a set of ramps at least, and I can get to the oil plug from the rear crawling up from the driver's door side, I just haven't tries changing it like this yet, so keep that in mind.
 
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