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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a complete drive train overhaul, transfer case rebuild, slip joint eliminator kit installed, new rear drive shaft and replaced the universals on the front drive shaft. I also replaced the yoke on the rear differential. The yoke that I put on there is one that uses u bolts instead of the bolt and strap. I had the old yoke off before I started to think about re-assembling. When I looked at the instructions, about torquing I discovered that I should have taken the wheels off and measured the pre-tension at the yoke with a torque wrench. Then when putting the yoke back on to tighten it gradually until the same tension is measured.

When I discovered this, I started reading the information about the yoke setup. It said to torque between 200 and 210 ft-lbs until the tension was a particular value. So, trying to be on the safe side I torqued the yoke to 200 ft-lbs. After completing all of the work, I took the jeep for a ride around the block and felt all of the pieces parts that I had worked on. The front part of the differential where the bearing is inside warmed up quite a bit. Hot to the touch but not so hot as to burn my hand after a ride of about 8 miles.

So, I'm wondering if there is any advice for me about the rear end and what to do so as not to cause any damage to it. I am hoping to err on the side of being safe rather than sorry.
 

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I did a complete drive train overhaul, transfer case rebuild, slip joint eliminator kit installed, new rear drive shaft and replaced the universals on the front drive shaft. I also replaced the yoke on the rear differential. The yoke that I put on there is one that uses u bolts instead of the bolt and strap. I had the old yoke off before I started to think about re-assembling. When I looked at the instructions, about torquing I discovered that I should have taken the wheels off and measured the pre-tension at the yoke with a torque wrench. Then when putting the yoke back on to tighten it gradually until the same tension is measured. When I discovered this, I started reading the information about the yoke setup. It said to torque between 200 and 210 ft-lbs until the tension was a particular value. So, trying to be on the safe side I torqued the yoke to 200 ft-lbs. After completing all of the work, I took the jeep for a ride around the block and felt all of the pieces parts that I had worked on. The front part of the differential where the bearing is inside warmed up quite a bit. Hot to the touch but not so hot as to burn my hand after a ride of about 8 miles. So, I'm wondering if there is any advice for me about the rear end and what to do so as not to cause any damage to it. I am hoping to err on the side of being safe rather than sorry.
Well an easy way to keep away from messing up your bearings ( been there myself, I failed to learn about the proper way to re torque the yoke before I used my guess wrench on it). Simply replace the crush sleeve.
A new crush sleeve will take the guess work out of it all. Then you don't need to know what the old torque was. It can be put in from the yoke side. No need to remove the diff cover. What axle? Stock d35?
 

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fwiw... you need inch lbs to measure the bearing preload...most are around 10 to 20. I checked the load on the nut before I took the yoke off.. it was 210, just like it should have been.. preload was also with in spec.. so i just put the new one on at 210.. and as it was right be fore 4 days of trail ridding.. ran it to the shop to check it over to make sure it was all fine.. no issues.. Thus in the end just get it within spec and you should be good to go.. if worried run it to the shop and see... was very cheap insurance and peace of mind for me..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I work at a vocational high school and went to a statewide workshop. I sought out a couple of automotive people today. The second one that I talked to gave me what sounds like the information I needed. The new yoke came with a "spacer" which I have found out is actually a crush ring. I have to take the yoke back off, remove the brand new seal I just put on there, remove the bearing and the old crush ring. Put the new crush ring and the bearing back on, new seal, and then go through the tightening procedure on the yoke with the new crush ring in there to set the preload within the range given in the manual. I'll have to look that up again and yes it is measured in inch-lbs. The number 15 to 25 rings a bell but I'll have to give it a looksee to verify this. Thanks for the help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Took the wheels and drums off. Disconnected the drive shaft. There is no play to the front or rear on the pinion shaft with the yoke on. The amount of force needed to turn it by hand is minimal. I haven't measured it yet but a rough guesstimate would put it somewhere between 10 and 20 inch pounds of force to turn the yoke. I think I may have been concerned over nothing.

@ 4Jeepn,

To verify what you were saying, when you removed the pinion nut it was 210 ft-lbs of torque. To put it back on you torqued it to 210 and the pre-load was within spec. meaning about 10 to 20 inch pounds....is that right?

The torquing instructions in the Chrysler manual say to start at 200 ft-lbs and then increment slowly if the pre-load is less than a set value. So that is why I started at 200. I may have gotten lucky and it came out OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
One last question. How do you get an inch pound torque wrench -- 1/4" drive to fit onto a 3/4" drive 1-1/8 inch socket???
 

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1/4" to 3/8 adapter to 3/8 to 1/2 adapter to 1/2 adapter to 3/4 adapter

B est I got
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The adapters I have all go the wrong direction. Meaning they have the wrong sex....so to speak.

@ LittleGreenYJ
The 200 ft-lbs is how much the nut is torqued. The inch pound torque wrench is used to measure bearing pre-load. The amount of pressure that it takes to turn the yoke with no load on the axles meaning brake drums removed.
 

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The adapters I have all go the wrong direction. Meaning they have the wrong sex....so to speak.

@ LittleGreenYJ
The 200 ft-lbs is how much the nut is torqued. The inch pound torque wrench is used to measure bearing pre-load. The amount of pressure that it takes to turn the yoke with no load on the axles meaning brake drums removed.
Tack weld a cheap 1/4" socket to the back of your 1-1/8" socket for the preload measurement, then grind the tack off after. The 1-1/8 should be fine afterwards, the smaller one might be sacrificial... You may want to pull the rear axle shafts if you're going to get technical with the preload figures, as they are for pinion and carrier resistance only.
 

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The adapters I have all go the wrong direction. Meaning they have the wrong sex....so to speak. @ LittleGreenYJ The 200 ft-lbs is how much the nut is torqued. The inch pound torque wrench is used to measure bearing pre-load. The amount of pressure that it takes to turn the yoke with no load on the axles meaning brake drums removed.
Ah, I see know. Thanks for clearing that up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I explained the situation to our auto shop teacher who has done a lot of this type of work. He said that if it was his vehicle he would have used his impact wrench on it and hit it a couple quick times after the nut stopped turning to make sure that it was up against the crush ring....done. Given what I described that the unloaded turning force was minimal and there was no play in or out on the pinion, he said he would just run it the way that it is. So, I'm going to take the cover of the differential off to drain the oil, inspect the differential and seal it back up and fill it with fresh oil this weekend and run it. All should be well......that is my story and so far, I'm sticking to it!

Thanks for all of the replies.
 
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