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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at my Jeep and doing some eyeball measurements, it's apparent that the rear axle is not centered along the longitudinal axis (between driver and passenger sides) and is not aligned with the front axle along this axis.

After some research, it is my understanding that the solution to this is an adjustable rear track bar (I already have an adjustable front track bar).

However, my research ALSO indicates a lot of reports of problems with contact with aftermarket diff covers. I'm running the ARB units, which are apparently some of the thicker ones out there (and more prone to interference).

I'm running Rock Crawler 3.5" springs in the back (along with the RK track bar bracket and spring wedges)

Can anyone share experience with this setup and a rear track bar that has worked?

Also, any info on how to align the rear axle when installing the new trackbar would be appreciated (my research indicates that most people just "eyeball" it, but I am more inclined to precision when it comes to stuff that can chew up tires and cause accidents...) . ;-)

While I'm at it I might also put some spacers in the passenger side to address the "JK lean" I have (about an inch difference!).

Thanks in advance!
 

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I have the ARB covers front and rear,, along with a set of Mopar 2" springs (around 3" or so up front and 2" in back). I have the TeraFlex track bars front and rear with no contact issues. I would think more lift would reduce the chances of contact between the two, but I don't know.
Previously I was running near 4" of lift in back and also had no issues between the ARB covers and the TF track bars.
I am a bit OCD, so to center the axles I used a level and a measuring tape, the level to get a straight line down from the fender to measure to, and used the measuring tape to measure to the center of the wheel.
While centering the axles makes me feel better, I really don't think it is as critical to proper functionality as you might think.
 

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Awhile back there was a thread that compared the lengths of several adjustable track bars. There were only a few, if I remember correctly, that could go shorted than stock. That's what I believe I needed to center my rear axle after a 2.5" lift. I used the SUPERLIFT RELFEX ADJ RR TRACK BAR.
To get it centered I hung a string w/ weight, think plumb bob, from the frame on each side then took measurements to a fixed point on each side. Once I knew how far off I was I adjusted the new track bar to pull the axle back into place. (I 1st set both new and old bars to same length by adjusting and using the bolts to make sure they were of equal length.)
A ratchet strap helped center the axle to install the new track bar. Measuring after install verified my fit and alignment.
Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys!

While I don't really have a comparison (since this Jeep had this lift on it when I bought it a month ago) it feels to me like it "crabs" a bit while driving down the highway, which I assume could be from one axle being a bit off center from the other. I jumped to this conclusion once I realized that having an adjustable up front but not in the rear, caused this misalignment.

The steering wheel re-centers, but it still feels a bit like I'm fighting it. It might be just because the alignment was set by a tire shop, and if the "factory specs" are different from what it should be with a lift, that might be causing some of the issues as well.

I'm new to dealing with solid front axles with coil springs (always had leafs with solid front axles) so I'm feeling my around in the dark when trying to dial this thing in. :)
 

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Thanks guys!

While I don't really have a comparison (since this Jeep had this lift on it when I bought it a month ago) it feels to me like it "crabs" a bit while driving down the highway, which I assume could be from one axle being a bit off center from the other. I jumped to this conclusion once I realized that having an adjustable up front but not in the rear, caused this misalignment.

The steering wheel re-centers, but it still feels a bit like I'm fighting it. It might be just because the alignment was set by a tire shop, and if the "factory specs" are different from what it should be with a lift, that might be causing some of the issues as well.

I'm new to dealing with solid front axles with coil springs (always had leafs with solid front axles) so I'm feeling my around in the dark when trying to dial this thing in. :)
As long as both axles are straight / perpendicular to the chassis the Jeep should drive straight. If one or both axles are offset to one side or the other it should not affect whether it drives straight or not. Typically if it doesn't drive straight it means one or both axles are not straight / perpendicular to the chassis. That is usually from the frame being bent. But it could have adjustable control arms that are not properly adjusted.
The axle being adjusted side to side should not affect how straight it drives.
An alignment should show you if the thrust line is right. If it is, something else is going on.
But I am still a fan of adjustable track bars.
 
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