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Yep on a lift and if I had one then I would do it.
I don't have a lift either. I'll be starting my regear in another couple of weeks... on jack stands. I'll tell ya though... I already did my front seals on jack stands and it is NOT FRIGGIN FUN getting that dammed carrier in and out while laying on your belly. Those eliminators may prove to be more work than you think.
 

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I don't have a lift either. I'll be starting my regear in another couple of weeks... on jack stands. I'll tell ya though... I already did my front seals on jack stands and it is NOT FRIGGIN FUN getting that dammed carrier in and out while laying on your belly. Those eliminators may prove to be more work than you think.
I've done something to my shoulder and I don't think a few weeks rest is going to fix it. I have not been able to lift my right arm above my head now for about 4 weeks. I am really getting to old for this stuff but I love it.

If it is just the seal I think I will just mark everything with markers paint change the seal then put flange/nut back to the same setting. Should work, but the book says new crush sleeve. If I could get the front bearing out easy enough then installing the eliminator would be simple, just measure the crush sleeve with my micrometer and duplicate. But I will have to wait on that to many other jobs in the works now.
 

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Even with the C.S.E., you'l need to exert 200 +/- ft lbs. to properly torque the pinion nut. I'd highly suggest a "Bleepin Jeep yolk flange tool & on the rear (D44), use a 3/4" piece of pipe propped against the frame as you're tightening the nut.
 

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Even with the C.S.E., you'l need to exert 200 +/- ft lbs. to properly torque the pinion nut. I'd highly suggest a "Bleepin Jeep yolk flange tool & on the rear (D44), use a 3/4" piece of pipe propped against the frame as you're tightening the nut.
I used that tool when I did my gears. Certainly made it possible. Also, my wife helped me and she held everything in place while I held onto the frame and used my leg to reach the required torque needed to crush the sleeve. I’m not a big guy and I’m 50, so I have to work a little differently some times. My legs are a whole lot stronger than my arms. 😁

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #105
I don't have a lift either. I'll be starting my regear in another couple of weeks... on jack stands. I'll tell ya though... I already did my front seals on jack stands and it is NOT FRIGGIN FUN getting that dammed carrier in and out while laying on your belly. Those eliminators may prove to be more work than you think.
The carrier in-and out sucks big time. I found it best sitting down, back hunched forward, one leg off to the left of the diff, this gives about 3 inches between your face and your knee and a few inches to move up and down with the carrier, holding all the shims from falling out - one hand for each side.... Good luck hammering in pinion races

Get a very long handled race driver tool. And a very long brass punch... 18-24" range

Once in position it was actually somewhat comfortable - problem is standing up again takes about 15 minutes of hips and back re-adjusting...
 

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Discussion Starter #107
Bonus pic of new bumper on wife's....

Drives great, Did get the traction control light, so ... argh.. I did use the new hubs, and sensors, maybe the harness didn't plug all the way in as its a bitch from the wheel well... i'll worry about it later, I need a rest..... I'll have to bust out the code reader.

Every step was a process... right to the end... my front driveshaft needed TLC and nylon wheel to clean it up to mount to the TC.... every step of the way a battle! But prevailed...

Special thanks to @sierradmax who went way above and beyond to help answer any additional questions and a provided me a quite detailed step-by-step doc which helped tremendously and gave me the confidence to attempt this.

Looks, good, runs good.... glad to have it all buttoned up.
Whew.
 

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You installed a lift. Code is most likely from your steering not being centered.


Hopefully someone can find a comparable thread on this forum and replace the link above with that (I don't want to link to another forum, but I do want to help you get the answer you're looking for).

When I did my lift several years ago, same thing happened to me. It probably happens to everyone, and no one ever expects it (it's usually the last thing that happens after installing the lift and only noticed during that special test drive when one wants to appreciate the fruits of their labor). Useful tool to help center the steering is AEV ProCal (there are a couple others like it). It will help you center it enough to get it to an alignment shop. Don't forget to check your all your [suspension] bolts after a few hundred miles to ensure they are still tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #109
You installed a lift. Code is most likely from your steering not being centered.


Hopefully someone can find a comparable thread on this forum and replace the link above with that (I don't want to link to another forum, but I do want to help you get the answer you're looking for).

When I did my lift several years ago, same thing happened to me. It probably happens to everyone, and no one ever expects it (it's usually the last thing that happens after installing the lift and only noticed during that special test drive when one wants to appreciate the fruits of their labor). Useful tool to help center the steering is AEV ProCal (there are a couple others like it). It will help you center it enough to get it to an alignment shop. Don't forget to check your all your [suspension] bolts after a few hundred miles to ensure they are still tight.
Thanks for the insight! I have the pro-cal so I will have to play around with that! Great reminder for the re-torque!
 

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Good luck hammering in pinion races

Get a very long handled race driver tool. And a very long brass punch... 18-24" range
We'll see.
I d have new races just in case, but I may just leave the originals in there. We'll see what they look like when I open up. The jeep only has about 30K on it so the original races should still have lots of life.
 

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My JK had 5,000 miles when I changed my gears. I thought about leaving the races in, asked around and was told new bearings seat properly with new races.
 

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Discussion Starter #114
Yeah i'd run the new ones.... it's no harder than any other races... just awkward, like i said, a longer reach driver resting on a milk crate makes it easier. I used my jack handle over my race driver for extension, it worked, but created play where they meet so it took lateral force to hold it sideways tight to the race before striking. Tough 1 foot off the ground....but very doable. Just prepare for that step to take an hour.... like every other step... lol
 

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Discussion Starter #115
I spoke with @sierradmax to ask him if he minded if I posted the step guide as I'm sure it will help others.....what a standup guy who went way above and beyond to answer questions and prepare this and really helped my confidence to get going on this.

Re-gear direction from @sierradmax
"
  1. Put pinion bearing races in a freezer. If you don’t know which ones they are, wait until step 9 to match old with new.
  2. Drain differential oil, unbolt driveshaft from yolk and hang it out of the way. Remove tires, brakes, hubs, & axle shafts. Remove differential cover.
  3. Loosen Carrier bearing cap bolts but do not remove.
  4. Setup differential spreader such that it supports itself on the differential. I add a ratchet tie-down strapped to the axle to prevent it from falling should it get knocked or bumped.
  5. Loosen bearing caps so there’s ¼-1/2” separation between caps & carrier bearing races.
  6. Spread differential slowly, ¼ turn to budge carrier easily with a pry-bar. Once free, the carrier caps will prevent the carrier from falling out any further. Now you can remove the caps and set the carrier aside. Take note and mic the shims as driver & passenger. Also, it’s very important to note carrier bearing cap orientation & placement. They’re machined per side and up-down. They’ll have to be re-installed EXACTLY how they were removed. Let the carrier drain in an oil drain pan.
  7. Remove pinion by using the yolk flange tool and loosening pinion nut. Do not remove completely. Leave a couple threads. Tap pinion with brass punch/hammer towards the axle into the differential housing. Once loose, completely remove yolk, nut & pinion. Mic. Original Crush Sleeve (CS) and note.
  8. Remove pinion seal. Once removed, there’s a shim called the “outer pinion oil baffle”. This is supposed to keep differential oil off the seal. The outer pinion bearing can be removed as well.
  9. Using a long brass punch, knock the pinion bearing races (both inner & outer) out.
Now you have a completely stripped differential housing.

  1. Remove carrier bearings & inner pinion bearing from old R&P. The inner pinion shim will be between the head and bearing. This is sometimes called the “oil slinger”. Mic this shim and set it aside. I like to use the clamshell bearing puller.
  2. Remove old ring gear and install new (or new carrier). Torque to specs.
  3. Press on new carrier bearings.
  4. Using race setting tool, install new pinion bearing races.
  5. It’s up to you whether you want to make an inner pinion setup bearing but I recommend making an outer. Use a die-grinder and hone the inside of the old pinion bearings so they slip over the pinion easily. As I mentioned in my post, the clamshell puller works well to where I’ll use the new inner pinion bearing, pressed on, as setup & final. Don’t forget about inner shim/oil slinger.
Although this step is not needed, I find it helpful with understanding “total carrier shim stack”

  1. Without pinion installed, place carrier with new bearings & races in housing. Install bearing caps (with proper orientation) and hand tighten. Using shim drive tool, try to place old carrier shims. One side I’m sure will go in easily. I usually install the original shim to the “ring gear side” of the carrier. The new bearings and/or carrier might be wider than the old so you may have to determine the shim stack with the new carrier shims on the other (in my case, pinion carrier side). Use a pry-bar or dead blow hammer to move the carrier side to side. Use a “feeler gauge” to see if any additional shims can be installed. Sometimes, I’ll set up a dial indicator to see if there’s any lateral movement with the carrier. If so, more shims are needed. Once there’s no movement, disassemble and record thicknesses of shims used on both sides. I.E…. .025” on RGS + .032” on PCS = .057” total shim stack.
  2. The principle with total carrier shim stack is such that any adjustments to the carrier must equal the total shim stack. For the equation above, .057 - .020” RGS = .037” needed on PCS. Additionally, since you’ve already spread the carrier by probably 5 thou with the case spreader, once tension is relieved (spreader removed), you’ve automatically set carrier pre-load.
  1. Place inner pinion shim/oil slinger between pinion head & inner pinion bearing (new or honed-original. Using Crush Sleeve Eliminator (CSE) and old Crush sleeve dimension (from note 7), add 10-20 thou. using supplied shims. Slip over pinion and insert into differential.
  2. In a monkey-like contortion approach, hold pinion head and with opposite hand, slide outer pinion setup bearing, oil baffle, yolk, & nut on. Tighten to 200 ft. lb. or (I think) 20-40 in lb. preload, whichever comes first.
Note: if pinion nut tightens to 200 ft. lb. and the pinion rotates freely, remove shims from CSE. The opposite if resistance is greater than 20-40 in. lb. The trick is you don’t want to crush the bearings….!

Once you’ve established spec’d pinion preload, now you’re ready to install the carrier.

  1. Install new (front) differential seals
  2. In similar fashion, repeat process “A” above by installing the carrier & caps without shims. Install original RGS shim and remaining shims on PCS to make it total carrier stack as calculated in step “B”. The original RGS shim may or may not go in. If not, reduce thickness and repeat yet remember, whatever thickness you remove from RGS, add to PCS.
  3. Continue until proper backlash (BS) is obtained.
  4. Use gear marking compound and check contact pattern. Be sure to put pinion under “load” by holding a wrench on one of the ring gear bolts, applying pressure, and rotating pinion.
  5. I could tell you many ways on what type of pattern you should be looking for but favorable is a nice “crown” towards the toe of the drive side. There are many pictures on the web that will assist you with what your pattern looks like and what corrections are to be done to get desired contact pattern. It is a balance of moving the pinion towards and away from Centerline of the axle and carrier laterally away from or closer to the pinion head. Just remember carrier shim stack. Also, let’s say you need to push the pinion closer to the axle (deeper toe contact), add shims between the pinion head and inner pinion bearing. If using the CSE, you’ll need to add the same thickness in CSE shims to maintain pinion preload.
Tip: make large incremental adjustments i.e. 10 thou.

Once you’ve got a desirable contact pattern, you’re ready for final setup.

  1. If you haven’t done so, press new inner pinion bearing onto pinion with inner pinion shim/oil slinger and repeat steps 15-19. This time, I install the Crush Sleeve (CS) in place of the CSE. I do not install the seal. Tighten yolk and pinion nut so spec’d pinion preload. I like to check contact pattern one last time….
  2. Now, you have a desired pattern, correct pinion preload yet the yolk is on and with no seal. Using the yolk flange tool, you an “press” the yolk off with a bolt kind of like a “steering wheel puller”. Once removed, install the seal, re-install the yolk and tighten to spec using the new supplied nut & RED Loctite.
  3. Repeat step 2 in reverse order to re-assemble. If on rear axle, now’s a good time to install new outer seals and/or bearings & collars.
  4. Follow instructions for light to moderate driving for gear brake-in and replace fluids after 500 +/- miles."
I hope this will help many others as it did help me. This is really do-able with the right tools and time. Many skills help and were learned-
- knowing what bearing pre-load 'feels' like. Turn your pinions by hand once driveshafts are off, feel new hubs, feel old hubs, pre-load is a feel that knowing it before would be of use
-a front axle seal install tool was super nice to have and worked like a champ... for the 5 minutes I used it and it was 80bucks or so.... could easily make your own with threaded rod (allthread)
-A long metal bar long enough to punch out the inner seals (soft/brass end careful not to ding housing)
-A nice 24" torque wrench with a extension pipe (i found 1.5" PVC pre-cuts from home-depot worked well- plastic, light

If your Jeep is a few years old, and has lived in the rust-belt then prepare to double your time estimation as always....
So as of this post I have about 60 miles on the front, and 810 on the rear... Will flush and fill with Torco the front at 500 miles as I did the rear.

True Trac works great... even with all the Torque of the 4.88's and my well worn 315's MT's the most tire slip I ever hear on sand or loose gravel is a short little sound before the tire stops slipping.... a fraction of a revolution... I've yet to really play with it in dirt or snow.... Haven't even tried 4-low yet will wait until I hit 500 on the front and flush.
 

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Discussion Starter #116
You installed a lift. Code is most likely from your steering not being centered.


Hopefully someone can find a comparable thread on this forum and replace the link above with that (I don't want to link to another forum, but I do want to help you get the answer you're looking for).

When I did my lift several years ago, same thing happened to me. It probably happens to everyone, and no one ever expects it (it's usually the last thing that happens after installing the lift and only noticed during that special test drive when one wants to appreciate the fruits of their labor). Useful tool to help center the steering is AEV ProCal (there are a couple others like it). It will help you center it enough to get it to an alignment shop. Don't forget to check your all your [suspension] bolts after a few hundred miles to ensure they are still tight.
Good call on the steering wheel center. I re-centered it with pro-cal and light went off... Funny thing, now those 2 marker lights on the front that are used via pro-cal to tell you to turn draglink to left or right are always on and stay on longer like the automatic headlights....

Fine tuned my 16JKU draglink with the procal and the marker lights stay on this Jeep too now afterwards!

Now both my Jeeps are driving around with the 2 front marker lights on, and no other lights. Makes me feel like my Jeeps are rosey cheeks!
 

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So what do ya figure.... I'd say pinion too close? Now that's with the factory shim which is 1.24mm. I figure divide that in half for about .62mm?

4434438


4434440
 

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Discussion Starter #119
Good call on the steering wheel center. I re-centered it with pro-cal and light went off... Funny thing, now those 2 marker lights on the front that are used via pro-cal to tell you to turn draglink to left or right are always on and stay on longer like the automatic headlights....

Fine tuned my 16JKU draglink with the procal and the marker lights stay on this Jeep too now afterwards!

Now both my Jeeps are driving around with the 2 front marker lights on, and no other lights. Makes me feel like my Jeeps are rosey cheeks!
Figured this out - Using the PROCAL to center wheel, once draglink is perfectely adjusted for perfect center, it will HONK TWice with your face under the running jeep(scared the hooter outta me) and those lights will no longer stay on a timer. That must be to indicate the procedure wasn't done to perfect center.
 

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Are you at specced backlash with this pattern? I kinda like it - towards to toe on the drive side I think is the goal
Backlash was a little higher than I had liked... just outside the high limit. I did end up dividing the factory shim by two... which of course made the backlash even worse so I had to move the carrier closer to the pinion. Interestingly enough the right side factory carrier shim was a little bigger than the left side so I simply reversed the two shims and that all kind of brought it together.
The pinion is now in permanently and tomorrow I'll drop the carrier back in.

Of course the rear is the easy one. I still have the front to do... and I'm feeling pretty beaten up!
 
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