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I'm preparing to install a pair of 4:11 axles to replace my stock 3:07 axles. The pinion seal on the 4:11 rear axle had some seepage, so while the axle is still out, I'll replace the pinion seal.
The FSM states to measure the torque required to turn the rear yoke prior to removing the nut. Record the torque value.
Then, after replacing the seal and yoke, tighten a new nut and measure the torque necessary to turn the yoke. Tighten the new nut in small increments until you've reached your recorded value. Then add 5 ft. Lbs and tighten a bit more until you've reached the new value.

I need to buy a beam style inch pound torque wrench because all I have is a click type inch pound torque wrench.

My choices for a new beam style torque wrench are 80 inch pounds and 800 inch pounds. If someone has done this in the past, what value did you find necessary to turn the rear pinion yoke with the vehicle on jackstands and the rear wheels removed?

TIA, and Good Luck, L.M.
 

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You could try an electronic torque adapter. They usually have a larger range and read the current torque the same way a beam type does. And maybe more accurate.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks 89JeeperYJ,
I looked at Harbor Freight. They have a digital adapter that the specs state starts at 29.5 ft lbs.
29.5 ft lbs = 354 inch lbs.
The reviews state that it actually measures as low as 5 ft lbs
5 ft lbs - 60 inch lbs

the two torque wrenches I'm looking at read 80 inch lbs and 800 inch lbs.
80 in lbs = 6.66 ft lbs and
800 in lbs = 66.66 ft lbs

I still would like to know about how many inch pounds I can expect to be dealing with.
If it's in the 0-80 range the digital adapter from HF won't work. If it's in the 60 inch pounds and above, the digital adapter might fit the bill.

If I was a full time mechanic, the cost of the tool wouldn't be too big of an issue for me. As it is, I'm a retired, part time home mechanic that primarily plays with my Jeep. I'm reluctant to drop a lot of dough on a tool I may use once or at most a few times.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Al,
Great minds work alike.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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I suggest that you forget what the manual says...

Mark the position of the nut and then carefully count turns to remove it... IE 12 1/4 turns or whatever it is...

Then replace it exactly as it was and stake it in place...
 

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I suggest that you forget what the manual says...

Mark the position of the nut and then carefully count turns to remove it... IE 12 1/4 turns or whatever it is...

Then replace it exactly as it was and stake it in place...
Thanks Gottagofast,
That's an option that I've considered. My Jeep is driveable, so I'm not in a hurry. If I don't get the info I need in a reasonable amount of time I can do that.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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I suggest that you forget what the manual says...

Mark the position of the nut and then carefully count turns to remove it... IE 12 1/4 turns or whatever it is...

Then replace it exactly as it was and stake it in place...
I'm sorry Gottgofast but with a crush sleeve, this is very bad advice. That is why the manual says to add an extra 5lbs of torque to compress the crush sleeve enough to keep pinion pre-load mostly correct. I'd suggest a new pinion nut but if the old one is difficult to take off just re-use it with red threadlocker and stake it to be double sure it doesn't loosen along with the extra 5lbs of torque.

A beam type torque wrench will also show you the loosening torque of the original if you pay attention.
 

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Common problem when people replace the seal incorrectly with the crush sleeve not compressed the extra 5 lbs is the pinion preload messed up and the pinion bearings loosening from wear.
 

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Also @Luckymac, you're looking at around 200-220ft/lbs for pinion nut preload torque and if you're checking pinion bearing preload for used bearings, 5-15in/lbs.
 

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Thanks 89JeeperYJ,
I looked at Harbor Freight. They have a digital adapter that the specs state starts at 29.5 ft lbs.
29.5 ft lbs = 354 inch lbs.
The reviews state that it actually measures as low as 5 ft lbs
5 ft lbs - 60 inch lbs

the two torque wrenches I'm looking at read 80 inch lbs and 800 inch lbs.
80 in lbs = 6.66 ft lbs and
800 in lbs = 66.66 ft lbs

I still would like to know about how many inch pounds I can expect to be dealing with.
If it's in the 0-80 range the digital adapter from HF won't work. If it's in the 60 inch pounds and above, the digital adapter might fit the bill.

If I was a full time mechanic, the cost of the tool wouldn't be too big of an issue for me. As it is, I'm a retired, part time home mechanic that primarily plays with my Jeep. I'm reluctant to drop a lot of dough on a tool I may use once or at most a few times.

Good Luck, L.M.
LM,

I thought that thing went lower than that.

As for which one to purchase to keep from buying more than you need. I don't have any experience with that myself.

If you don't get an answer though. One thing you can do, if you have a low enough click type torque wrench. Before you disassemble your rear end you could use your current torque wrench too find the rough range you need purchase. Would just require some trial and error.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
 

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That "bad advice" has served me and many others well many times and nets the same preload that the pinion had before removal.... any changes to pinion preload should be measured, not guessed at...

That said, I would estimate it by feel way before trying to use a cheap digital adapter....
 

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That "bad advice" has served me and many others well many times and nets the same preload that the pinion had before removal.... any changes to pinion preload should be measured, not guessed at...

That said, I would estimate it by feel way before trying to use a cheap digital adapter....
Well good for you, I've seen otherwise since I have actually worked in the industry with many diy "mechanics" fixing leaking pinion seals using your same method with bad results. Crush sleeve axles are very sensitive to pinion nut preload and so is bearing preload. There is absolutely no way you achieve the same preload by counting threads and by feel no matter how experienced you are, that's why all axle builders worth their salt measure preload with a either a very accurate beam type or digital torque wrench.
 

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Well good for you, I've seen otherwise since I have actually worked in the industry with many diy "mechanics" fixing leaking pinion seals using your same method with bad results. Crush sleeve axles are very sensitive to pinion nut preload and so is bearing preload. There is absolutely no way you achieve the same preload by counting threads and by feel no matter how experienced you are, that's why all axle builders worth their salt measure preload with a either a very accurate beam type or digital torque wrench.

Gotta disagree with there c5, There is real world and then book world. Also, we are talking about a used diff and not a total rebuild. Not only would I not use a torque wrench, I would use the old nut and my Ingersol Rand to put it on with. But hey, that's just me and 25 years hands on experience.
 

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Gotta disagree with there c5, There is real world and then book world. Also, we are talking about a used diff and not a total rebuild. Not only would I not use a torque wrench, I would use the old nut and my Ingersol Rand to put it on with. But hey, that's just me and 25 years hands on experience.
I gave hack master advice too. If this was the shop I'd replace the pinion seal, crush sleeve, and pinion nut and give it proper preload so I'm confident I wouldn't see the axle again later. The main point is that you have to crush the crush sleeve a little more than when you took it off so it doesn't loosen on you. It is also extremely easy to over crush a used crush sleeve to since the fold already started.
 

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It won't loosen if it's staked in place as I said in my first post
 

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Well I've given my advice, take it as you will. I've seen many axles and not just the dana 35 with poor seal replacement technique where the pinion contacted the carrier sometime after even years after: D35/low pinion D30/D44, Ford 7.5"/8.8", Gm 10 bolt/14bolt, toyota 7.5"/8". When it is not your own vehicle, I believe it best to give proper by the book advice and not just some repair that you'd do on your own vehicle under your own liabilty.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the input guys. What I'm looking for is the torque required to turn the pinion yoke nut with both rear tires removed, measured in inch pounds. (In my case the axle I'm working on is sitting on two horses).
c5wagner states that pinion bearing preload for used bearings is 5-15 inch pounds. Is this the measurement I'm looking for?
I don't mind buying tools, but I want to buy the tool that'll work for my current situation.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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5 to 15 inch pounds is the pinion bearing preload without carrier and axles.
 

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Thanks for the input guys. What I'm looking for is the torque required to turn the pinion yoke nut with both rear tires removed, measured in inch pounds. (In my case the axle I'm working on is sitting on two horses).
c5wagner states that pinion bearing preload for used bearings is 5-15 inch pounds. Is this the measurement I'm looking for?
I don't mind buying tools, but I want to buy the tool that'll work for my current situation.

Good Luck, L.M.
If you do want to measure proper preload with a beam type wrench and the axle shafts and carrier are still in, you're looking for around 25-30in/lbs. You don't measure preload by the initial turn but while constantly and steadily turning the pinion with the wrench.
 
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