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Discussion Starter #1
Just thought I'd post this so I can hopefully save someone else some time due to extra time I wasted.
When I rotated my tires this past weekend, I noticed I had a front wheel stud on my 2014 Willys JKU which appears to have gotten cross-threaded (possibly when I had a state inspection done, as that was the only other time aside from the last tire rotation I did when the wheel could possibly have been off. Not laying blame on them; I could have accidentally done it when I had the tires off last. A fair amount of the threads were compromised. What first brought this to light is that particular lug nut was pretty reluctant to come off easily. I examined the threads and pretty much knew I needed to replace that stud for "peace of mind" if nothing else. I got the appropriate size die (1/2, 20) to clean up and try to repair the threads a little, knowing it was a temporary fix until I could replace the stud.
I did a lot of research to see what size wrenches and sockets I may need which I didn't already have, namely the large socket (36mm) for the axle nut, as pretty much everything I had seen written up indicated the whole wheel hub assembly needed to be removed in order to easily gain access to the old wheel stud once pressed or hammered out and to make initial insertion of the new one easier. I wish I would have went with my gut instinct before I did a lot of unnecessary work.
Here are some things I found out:
To replace a front wheel stud, it ISN'T actually necessary to remove the hub assembly, assuming you're replacing the stud or studs with a stock length replacement. If you're looking at the back side of the front brake disc, the "dust/debris shield behind the brake disc has a cut-out on the rear side (firewall side vs. bumper (front) side and you can gain access to the back side of the rotor through that space. All that you need to do to make access easier to that space is remove the two 21mm bolts which hold the brake caliper bracket on. Once removed, take either zip ties or a bungee strap to suspend the caliper assembly from the shock's spring or other item in that area so it isn't exerting undue force on the brake line. After that's out of the way, rotate the brake disc so that the stud you need to remove is visible in the cutout on the shield. Using your hammer, give the stud a few good, square blows and it should come loose and you can reach in the back side of the disc through the cut out and pull the old stud out. My Jeep is newer so it certainly hammered out easier than many will, but you get the idea. Take the new stud and insert it through the open space into the stud hole. Take your time pulling the stud through, don't rush it. Luckily I had bought a few because I wound up messing up the first one. Once you have the new stud pushed through the stud hole in the rotor housing a little, take either washers a little larger than the stud (I used some thicker 5/8" dia. flat washers I picked up at Lowes) or there's a tool/spacer designed for it as well. I started off with 4 washers, used a new lug nut or you could use an "open" nut so the stud can feed through it. Make sure the stud starts straight and not at an angle to the rotor housing and once started, crank down on the nut a bit to help "pull" the stud into the brake rotor housing. You'll have to go a little at a time, backing the nut off and adding another washer occasionally as well as checking how close the back of the stud is to the rotor housing, but keep going at it and in a relatively short time the stud will be seated properly.
In a nutshell, the main tools you'll need are a 19mm socket and wrench for the lug nuts, and a 21mm wrench for the caliper bracket bolts, and a bit of patience never hurts. If you use an "open nut" instead of a lug nut it would probably be a little easier, as you wouldn't have to back the nut off periodically to add washers.
In retrospect, I'd do the job again if I needed too and now that I know there's a fairly easy way to do it, It would go a fair amount faster next time. Don't get me wrong, it still takes a little while but it's not nearly as involved as I thought it would be based on information I had found beforehand.
Sorry for the long write-up. It's late, I'm tired and the beer's going right to my head. Take care all!
 

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That's awesome it all worked out for u! I rank changing studs way down at the bottom of my hate to do list ab as low as changing U joints lol
 

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How the heck does someone cross thread a wheel nut on a stud? Did you use power tools? First step is to thread them on by hand! Also, torque them with a torque wrench, again by hand, then double and triple check. I take this process slowly and methodically, my life depends on it.
 

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How the heck does someone cross thread a wheel nut on a stud? Did you use power tools? First step is to thread them on by hand! Also, torque them with a torque wrench, again by hand, then double and triple check. I take this process slowly and methodically, my life depends on it.
Have u ever watched the guys at a tire shop putting lug nuts on??? "Most" of them put the nut on the socket and go to the stud full speed ahead NASCAR style lol. They get lucky most of the times but the times that they don't, if their not honest then you're stuck with a stripped stud.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm almost certain it was no fault of my own, but who knows. I use a battery operated impact to back the lugs off just to speed the process up a little, but put them back on by hand and torque them with a torque wrench. But as I mentioned, I hadn't had them off myself since the last time I rotated them (about 5,000 miles ago), so I can't say for certain what caused it. Now that I've replaced a stud and know what to expect and also know that I really can access them easier than the other methods I had read about, I could do them in a much shorter period of time. As Greg22585 said it's not necessarily something I want to do but having done one now, I wouldn't sweat doing it again. Not that hard in retrospect, just time consuming.
 

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How the heck does someone cross thread a wheel nut on a stud? Did you use power tools? First step is to thread them on by hand! Also, torque them with a torque wrench, again by hand, then double and triple check. I take this process slowly and methodically, my life depends on it.
Dang, someone is a little OCD.

Oh wait.

:)
 
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