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my brother rolled his, he was fine, idk how extreme it was but it was on its roof. Hes also about 6 foot 4. so his head is closer to the "ceiling" that most
 

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2000 Jeep Wrangler Sahara 4.0L 5spd Money pit Green
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In corporate lingo I thought they were called a "sport bar". Somewhere or another I've heard them called roll over assist bars. For me as a DD, the bars just are ......... Jeep.
 

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It is not as strong as a true cage...but better than just the cloth or plastic that makes up the "regular" top. Do not count on them to "save you"!!
 

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Just to point out one thing the Black Jeep on the street in front of the building with the for lease sign....that is not the factory bar up by the front of the Jeep...the Jeep does not have a bar at the windshield from the factory!!
 

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Just to point out one thing the Black Jeep on the street in front of the building with the for lease sign....that is not the factory bar up by the front of the Jeep...the Jeep does not have a bar at the windshield from the factory!!
I think that's the point -the factory setup tends to fold at the front, compromising the driver/passenger area. A full cage, while no guarantee of safety, does a much better job of keeping the area around your head intact.
 

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I think that's the point -the factory setup tends to fold at the front, compromising the driver/passenger area. A full cage, while no guarantee of safety, does a much better job of keeping the area around your head intact.
I agree just wanted to point it out in case someone wasn't sure.....
 

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I believe the factory setup is for a single use only. Certainly not designed for extreme off road where you can roll it down a hillside.

My opinion is knowing what type of environment you are wheeling in and plan accordingly. A fully welded cage is on my to do list.
 

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I believe the factory setup is for a single use only. Certainly not designed for extreme off road where you can roll it down a hillside.
This is a great way to sum it up.

On a TJ, the main hoop (the one at the b-pillar) is fairly stout and usually holds up okay in low-speed rollovers. The rear legs also tend to do okay, though they are susceptible to a side impact and can fold inward in such situations.

The bars that connect the main hoop to the windshield, on the other hand, are a complete joke. I think they are really only there just to anchor the top of the windshield, not to provide any rollover protection. As the above photos illustrate, in any sort of roll the windshield frame simply crushes and those bars fold like drinking straws. Since the windshield is usually some distance away from your head, front passengers can still make it out of a mild rollover despite this intrusion into the passenger compartment... but you would be far better off to add some strength and protection to that area.

A fully welded cage is on my to do list.
The die-hard crowd will often remove the entire cage assembly, then have one completely fabricated and installed. If you want the very best protection money can buy, this is it. Most of us casual Jeepers, however, simply want to improve upon the factory offering. For us, a weld-in "expansion" of the factory setup works well. This is what I did; I retained the stock main hoop and rear legs, but had DOM tubing installed to add more strength to the setup:



In my case, everything forward of the main hoop is new. As my fabricator friend put it, this is not a 'roll your Jeep at 200 MPH and walk away without a scratch' nascar cage. Instead, it is a 'roll your Jeep while rock crawling and get out in one piece' cage. In other words, it matches my needs perfectly.

One last thing: among the casual Jeepers, there is an unending debate about bolt-in verses weld-in cage enhancements. The weld-in option undoubtedly is stronger. The bolt-in crowd loves to preach that their design is strong enough... and there are some photos out there of a bolt-in cage surviving a light roll... just as there are photos of bolt-in cages that have failed miserably. Like everyone, you are free to form your own opinion and make your own decision.
 
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