Jeep Wrangler Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
2012 Wrangler JK lifted rockcrawlers and 33s.
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just noticed it today. Seems to be holding air.

Considering unscrewing it outside a tire repair shop and filling it with some type of sealant?

What do you guys recommend?

I could also get it patched or plugged.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,601 Posts
That might be too close to the edge to plug, but I don't really know for sure. Maybe stop by a tire shop, and if they tell you that it is too close, you can run it as long as it's not leaking air. See what happens just make sure you have a spare.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Teasip and branimal

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
A patch is the best option. A lot of people talk bad about plugs, but I've never had an issue with one. I'll usually plug a tire if it's getting close to the end of it's treadlife.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,709 Posts
My rather extensive experience with plugs leads me to conclude that plugs ALWAYS leak sooner or later. Great for emergency repairs but long term... forget it. Get it patched.
 

·
Registered
2012 Wrangler JK lifted rockcrawlers and 33s.
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My rather extensive experience with plugs leads me to conclude that plugs ALWAYS leak sooner or later. Great for emergency repairs but long term... forget it. Get it patched.


Yep, I've plug my tires on my Toyota and they leaked a few weeks later. I'm definitely getting a patch.

It might be outside the "patchable" area but I'm gonna have my tire shop patch and hope for the best.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
660 Posts
Looking at the picture, the screw is in the thick part of the tread, so it may not even be an issue. Had that happen a few times with mud terrain tires - held my breath while I pulled them out.

To me, that is a patchable area if it is all the way through. Had a few tires patched and they never gave me an issue. I would only "plug" an offroad only tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Sealant is always a last resort; it can effect the operation of the TPMS sensors in your valve stems. As others have said, a patch is best. The screw is in a borderline location, but it appears patchable if it went all the way through. Have a tire pro check it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
Looking at the picture, the screw is in the thick part of the tread, so it may not even be an issue. Had that happen a few times with mud terrain tires - held my breath while I pulled them out.
I had same thing happen too. I was able to remove the screw and verify it wasn't longer than than the lug. Of course I was at home, where I was prepared to remove the wheel/tire to take in for repairs, if the screw was longer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: branimal

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,346 Posts
I would not pull it out, I would unscrew it. That would minimize the damage to the tire. If you have a matching spare, I would swap this tire with the spare before taking the screw out. Looking at the type of head, it may be a sheet metal screw and they are generallly 1/2" or shorter. If it is a short screw, then it is unlikely to have penetrated the inner tire. If it hold air and you are concerned about the rotation, you can swap it back into it's normal spot and put the spare back on the rear. If it leaks you have time to get to your tire shop.
 
  • Like
Reactions: branimal

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
A plug is a temporary solution until you can get to a tire shop to have it patched from the inside, or buy a new tire.

Sent from my badass Galaxy S8 Plus
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,902 Posts
A tire shop is going to give you a hard time because it's too close to the side wall. Regulations Not reality.
Been plugging tires for 40 years and Never had one fail yet.
Ploy to sell tires.

Plug it and forget it. Christ, I ran plugs on my 600+ hp Camaro and never had a problem.

(I wonder how many chapters are in the book "the Pussification of America" )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
This is nothing more than a shameless plug for plugging tires.

In my youth, I watched the shop guys install patches and vulcanize the whole shooting match; including using the matches, fire/flame and smoke! It was the highlight of a visit to the gas station. (Oh, those good ole pre-heavy handed EPA, hand in everything days.)

A patch does not return the tire to it's manufactured structural integrity, it simply stops the leak and creates a surface repair. Is it stronger than a plug? If the bond is suitably created, yes, it can be, due to the surface area bonded to cover the defect. However, the defect exists through the entire carcass and tread of the tire. The belts, as punctured, still contain the same defects created by the puncturing object.

I stopped paying for tire repairs nearly 20 years ago. All of my issues with plugged tires were on small tires (yard trailer, lawnmower, ATV, etc.,.) I keep a plug kit in every vehicle and carry an emergency compressor on every trip. I have not had any issues with leaking plugs in any auto tire I've ever plugged. The biggest issue I found with sealing the hole is from proper seating of the plug. I always attempt to install the end of the plug with only about 1/4" to 3/8" of the end of the plug visible.

The last thing I want is a minimum wage shop flunky putting my expensive aluminum rims and tires on the machine to break down the tire for a patch. Careless employees will scuff rims with a precision unmatched in any machine shop. And, I have a friend who had a rim punctured - yes, punctured - by one of these ham-handed shop people while she was passing through Nashville. It was impressive to see the damage to the rim. I didn't know it could be done!
 
  • Like
Reactions: branimal

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
981 Posts
In the case of that tire a plug is the better option. Not all plug kits are created equal though. The rubber plugs are the ones that fail. I like the fiber rope type. You get a good kit that has multiple size ropes and you use the size that fits best. After properly reaming the hole round then installing it right and cutting it off flush you have a tire that's good as new.

I was glad when motorcycles went with tubeless tires. I use plugs on my bikes. I had 3 plugs in a rear tire on a Suzuki Katana I used to own. No problem. Where people get into trouble is trying to plug holes that are ripped or cut where it is an irregular shape and they try to use a rubber plug. That's going to leak everytime. I've relied on fiber patches most of my life. Usually always driving a vehicle with a couple plugged tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
It's in the tread so a shop should be willing to patch it. I'd patch it. I stay far away from those sealants.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
I've been in construction since the late 70s, I'd be willing to bet that I have spent at a bare minimum $1000 on plug kits because of all the nails and screws I've picked up over the years.
There is nothing wrong with using plugs, in many cases they are far better than an interior patch because they bond to the entire thickness of the tire, not just a 'bandaid' stuck on the inside.
Agree, I don't care for the rubber type, much prefer the saturated fiber style.

With that said, there have been a few times when I didn't have a plug and have had to resort to pulling the screw, coating it with 'liquid nails' and re-installing it to get somewhere that I could perform a 'real' repair....

Edit: um, don't tell the tire shop you glued the screw in.....
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top