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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,

I got a few gift cards to sears for x-mas and am looking to cash them in this weekend. On the list are socket extensions, new torque wrench, jack stands and floor jack.

My question is do I need a floor jack. I do mostly maintenance on the jeep and like to rotate the tires and such. I feel like a floor jack could be useful but am open to better suggestions... Also, is 2 3/4 ton enough or do I need to step up to something larger? I do realize I would need to use a 4x4 piece of wood to reach the height of the body, but that seems to be fairly common.

Also, what size jack stands are appropriate for a tj?

Thanks
flint
 

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Yes you need a floor jack. I have a 3 ton one. They are very handy, and how else do you plan on lifting the jeep onto the jackstands, with a bottle jack? lol

I have 3 ton jack stands.

Not sears, but I've had good results with the kobalt jack and stands:
Shop Kobalt 3-Ton Garage Jack and Jack Stands at Lowes.com
 

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Floor jack and stands are a MUST if you do work yourself. 2.5 tons is plenty. Think about it this way, that is 5000 lbs of lifting capability. Your Jeep weighs ROUGHLY 3400. You could "theoretically" lift the entire Jeep with the floor jack OR put the entire Jeep on 1 stand and still have room to add weight.

I have mostly Craftsman tools and I'm very happy with them. That includes my, Jack and stands.
 

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you can jack a Jeep, or any solid axle vehicle up by the axle pumpkins as well. you can put a set of stands under the axle tubes. 2-3/4 ton is fine. my only recommendation would be a 1 pump jack, saves all the pumping required on a regular jack and you still have plenty of control over lift speed if you just pump slowly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You recommend jacking on the pumpkin and not the frame? I guess that makes sense seeing as the frame is so far from the ground. Any disadvantage to just jacking on the tubes themselves?
 

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You recommend jacking on the pumpkin and not the frame? I guess that makes sense seeing as the frame is so far from the ground. Any disadvantage to just jacking on the tubes themselves?
That will work too. My personal preference is not to use the pumpkin. I'm always worried that a lip on the jack might catch the diff cover wrong and possibly produce a leak. I use axle tubes and in fact, I believe that the stock bottle jack instructions show that you are supposed to use the tubes.
 

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well, the tubes are round, the bottom of the pumpkin has more surface area for the jack pad to contact. plus it's easier to put your stands under the axle tubes when the jack is not in the way.
 

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When I rotate tires and do other matainance stuff I use 2 floor jacks and never need jack stands as I am not under the vehicle. Buy a set of 2 floor jacks and u wii use them both I guarantee it. way faster and easier then jack stands. Jack stands are very dangerous if not used properly.
 

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If you don't know how to properly use a jackstand, you probably shouldn't be using the jack either. I would NOT recommend working under ANY vehicle supported only by a jack. I have seen too many vehicles shift on a floor jack in my line of work. Jack stands can shift too but, at least 99% of them don't have wheels on the bottom like pretty much every floor jack does.
 

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When I rotate tires and do other matainance stuff I use 2 floor jacks and never need jack stands as I am not under the vehicle. Buy a set of 2 floor jacks and u wii use them both I guarantee it. way faster and easier then jack stands. Jack stands are very dangerous if not used properly.
= Dangerous!
 

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Joshpeb2 said:
If you don't know how to properly use a jackstand, you probably shouldn't be using the jack either. I would NOT recommend working under ANY vehicle supported only by a jack. I have seen too many vehicles shift on a floor jack in my line of work. Jack stands can shift too but, at least 99% of them don't have wheels on the bottom like pretty much every floor jack does.
Best advice on here .
 

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I dont take issue with the man using 2 jacks to rotate tires...so long as he doesn't get under the jeep he's golden. I rotate tires less than I do ANYTHING else... Brakes, adjust the control arms, change oil etc... Get the jack stands first, you won't be tempted to climb under there for anything.
 

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I don't know if it is correct or not but as a kid working in a garage I was told not to use a floor jack under the pumpkin that it is not designed to support the weight of the vehicle from that point and can cause damage to the whole housing . Just out of habit I try not tp but as narrow as the Jeep axle is its hard to find a spot that will leave enough space to get a jack stand under the axle . I have created a leak once by catching the cover like was mentioned earlier on my Dodge truck which reminded me about what I was told about 45 years ago not to do.
 

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A floor jack makes rotating tires SUPER easy!
I have an old 10 ton (left-over farm equipment). I hoist up one end, block it up, then throw the jack under the other end, and get to work.
This also makes it easy to slide a creeper under and eyeball everything now and then, to see if anything is broken, loose, or missing!(with more blocks for safety, of course)
 

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I use a 3 ton aluminum racing jack,and a set of 6 ton jack stands.3 ton stands arent high enough with my Jeep.I lift under the pumpkin in the rear ,and welded up an angle iron fixture to stick on my jack for the front axle tube,so I can get under center up front.And never get under my jeep with just the jack.Thats what stands are for,they dont have hydraulics that can slip,or wheels that can roll.
 

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been a while since i have worked(really worked) on vehicles-but i think the jeep will change that. back when i did alot of my own work i usually used both. i'd set the stands using a floor jack but i got in the habit of leaving the jack under somewhere, not bearing any weight but just in case. in the small town i have grown up in, over the yrs i know of 3 dropped cars w/1 survivor(got messed up though). to me, this is equiptment that there is no over kill on and something you do not want to pinch pennies over. not saying not to find a good deal-just saying not something i'd buy from the $$store. you definatly want quality and capicity.
 

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Watch out for the cheapie stands made from a tube - the tube is split into 3 legs at the base and welded to a plate.
I had my 'vette on them, all 4 wheels off, I was under it when I heard "Creeeek." I wasn't sure what the noise was, so I slid out from under it. Just as I was almost all the way out it came down, bruising my shoulder.

One of the legs on one of the stands buckled, the stand collapsed, stressing two of the other stands to collapse.

One slipped off the frame and went through the 'glass' floor, another put a crack in the body.

Even though those stands were rated way more than the entire 'vette weighed, it couldn't take the weight.

Now I only use the 4 legged welded type with the ratchet head. Even on those, inspect the welds every time you use it.

I still have one of those cheapie stands left - I clamped a bottle jack to the top of it - handy for lifting or holding up a trans a little.

4 floor jacks and 10 pairs of stands - seems like I always need one more jack.
 

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at the shop I work at we work mainly on big rigs (we do regular vehicles as well). We have them on jackstands all the time when doing various repairs. Same with 53' trailers. As long as you have them set flat on the floor with the entire base contacting the floor and you have them on a stable point on the vehicle they are safe. Be careful of weight ratings and never exceed them.
 
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