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Discussion Starter #1
Wanting some suggestions for shocks for on-road ride, comfort.

I see tons of posts talking about off road performance. I'm looking for a better ride for the 99% of the time I'll be driving my Jeep in daily life.

Thanks in advance.
 

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I am in the exact same boat as the original poster of this thread and will be watching closely.

I’ve read over 10hrs worth of old threads in the last month and soo much of the info out there is based on off road performance primarily.

I see lots of reviews call the Falcon and Fox Performance series as “stiff”. I don’t mind spending money on a premium shock I just want a nice on road ride to justify it.

Jason


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The Rancho shocks mentioned are a good value oriented shock. And the adjustable 9000 series have the advantage of being adjustable to allow you to adjust them to suit. That can be useful as not everyone has the same expectations when they say they want a better ride.
Rancho shocks don't have the build quality of some of the other choices, and there are other shocks in the budget range that can also work well. But there really are no other options for a budget shock that is adjustable. For that it is really about the Rancho's.
The stock shocks are overly soft, and it only gets worse as they get older. Most aftermarket options will be some degree firmer. Different options will be different levels of firmer. The OME shocks are softer than many, so if you want a firmer more sporting ride they would not be a great choice. The Rancho 5000 series shocks would be firmer, the 9000 series shocks have a range of adjustment where the 5000 series would be set in the middle of that range.
Shocks are funny, though. It isn't just about softer or firmer. A good quality shock can be both. It can allow the suspension to absorb bumps while still offering control for things like going around corners. The better quality the shock the more it can do both at the same time.

But unless you want to spend a lot more money it is really hard to beat just over $400 for a set of four adjustable 9000 series shocks.
 

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Thanks for the advice above and appreciate any other thoughts too. I'm in a similar situation, but different. I have stock shocks on my 2016 (new to me) JK Freedom Edition. Just installed a set of Black Rhino wheels and Nitto Ridge Grappler 33x12.5R17 tires. Now these new wheels and tires are a *lot* heavier than stock, (the new tires are like 10-ply heavy duty) and I think the wheels/tires and all their weight are bouncing around more than my stock shocks can dampen effectively. Potholes and such give me a bit of a shudder in the second after the pothole that I didn't really have before.

So mine's a daily driver and weekend beach attack vehicle for fishing/surfing/etc. I do expect to install a small lift (probably just the Teraflex leveling kit). Can anyone validate my symptoms/suspicions and suggest if new shocks will make a big difference over stock?

Thanks - and by the way if anyone needs a set of stock wheels with Goodyear Wrangler SR-A's let me know. Very motivated seller....
 

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i would STRONGLY recommend NOT getting a set of rancho 9000 shocks. i originally ordered a set because i too wanted a cheap set of adjustable shocks. when i received them, they already had rust on them out of a sealed box! not only that, but the valving was not the same between the sides. i could press down on both the rear or front shocks on the same setting and they would compress at VASTLY different rates! there was no way i was running that on my jeep!



i am currently running a set of falcon 3.3 shocks and absolutely LOVE the way they control the body of my jku! ideally, i would have a set of shocks with separate adjustable rebound and dampening to fine tune my ride, but the falcons set on setting 3 are darn near perfect for me right now. on setting 1, the rebound is a little light while the compression is nice and soft, but on setting 3 the rebound perfect.


if doing serious rock crawling, the rear reservoirs are a major nuisance for hanging down so low, but thats the only gripe i have with them.
 

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I have Rancho 9000 shocks on both of my Jeep Rubicons, 2014 and 2015. I put two coats of clear coat Rust Oleum on all four shocks on both vehicles, within two years they had heavy rust. In three years the front shocks on both Rubicons leaked which I replaced with new Rancho 9000's.

I put new Rancho shocks on just to keep the same shocks all the way around.

Both Jeeps are DD's with no rock crawling.

My next Jeeps, will not have Rancho's shocks on them. Very disappointed.


Pat
 

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I didn't put Rancho's on it and my Jeep has rust on it. Go figure. ^

And....... why the hell would you put on parts that already had rust on them from the factory? is the assembly rust a patina that your paying for with the rancho shocks? the point is that they came with rust on them, and that doesnt add up to quality, so its not something you should want to put on your vehicle.
 

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Pretty hard to beat the value of the Rancho shock. Yes finish could be better but they are much cheaper in cost than other adjustable shocks out on the market. If you want the best possible shock you can get where cost is not an issue then custom valved Kings is the way to go.
 

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Contact Metal Cloak about their oil filled stock shocks. They ride nice, better than my Falcon 2.1's.
 

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Thanks for the advice above and appreciate any other thoughts too. I'm in a similar situation, but different. I have stock shocks on my 2016 (new to me) JK Freedom Edition. Just installed a set of Black Rhino wheels and Nitto Ridge Grappler 33x12.5R17 tires. Now these new wheels and tires are a *lot* heavier than stock, (the new tires are like 10-ply heavy duty) and I think the wheels/tires and all their weight are bouncing around more than my stock shocks can dampen effectively. Potholes and such give me a bit of a shudder in the second after the pothole that I didn't really have before.

So mine's a daily driver and weekend beach attack vehicle for fishing/surfing/etc. I do expect to install a small lift (probably just the Teraflex leveling kit). Can anyone validate my symptoms/suspicions and suggest if new shocks will make a big difference over stock?

Thanks - and by the way if anyone needs a set of stock wheels with Goodyear Wrangler SR-A's let me know. Very motivated seller....
If you have not already, consider lowering your tire pressure for the changes.


Aside from that +1 for the Rancho 9000s. At this price point, I appreciate the changes I can make to the rideability of my Jeep. Sure you can spend more to upgrade your features.
 

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Thanks for the advice above and appreciate any other thoughts too. I'm in a similar situation, but different. I have stock shocks on my 2016 (new to me) JK Freedom Edition. Just installed a set of Black Rhino wheels and Nitto Ridge Grappler 33x12.5R17 tires. Now these new wheels and tires are a *lot* heavier than stock, (the new tires are like 10-ply heavy duty) and I think the wheels/tires and all their weight are bouncing around more than my stock shocks can dampen effectively. Potholes and such give me a bit of a shudder in the second after the pothole that I didn't really have before.

So mine's a daily driver and weekend beach attack vehicle for fishing/surfing/etc. I do expect to install a small lift (probably just the Teraflex leveling kit). Can anyone validate my symptoms/suspicions and suggest if new shocks will make a big difference over stock?

Thanks - and by the way if anyone needs a set of stock wheels with Goodyear Wrangler SR-A's let me know. Very motivated seller....
As Shadowmaker said. start by setting your tire pressures. bigger tires don't need as much air pressure. Most with bigger tires run around 30 psi, but some go even lower (I am running 28 psi most of the time). This is especially true if your new larger tires are also a heavier load rating than the stock C tires.
 

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I just put a set of Rancho 5000's on my 2010 including the SS. I would say that they are a big improvement but my Jeep only has 43,000 miles or so. It is a causal driver as I also have a 2016 Ford box truck that I drive most days in my construction business.

Not sure if the shocks that I removed were the originals but they were fairly rusty. Hearing about the rust issues with the Rancho's, I decided to put a coat of wax on mine and will try to run it through the car wash a couple of times a week to keep the NE road brine from building up.

I have run a couple of cans of Eastwood's interior frame spray in my frame rails and lightly sanded and put rust reformer on some of my other under parts. I wanted to do more before the weather turned bad but not sure life will allow that. Seems like there is always something else that gets in the way. I may just bite the bullet and have it professionally oil coated by a shop down the street.
 

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Thanks Shadowmaker and Guzzimoto - I agree and I'm on that same page. The shop that mounted and balanced for me handed over the vehicle with the tires at 50 PSI??!! I knew that couldn't be right.

After getting home I dropped them to 35, and after your comments will go to 30 or even less. And you're further correct in that the new tires are Load rated class E with (I believe) 10 Plies. 35 PSI is where I had my stock Goodyear Wrangler SR-A's - so a little softer may take a little of the edge off.

Thanks very much for the suggestions. This is my first Jeep, first set of what some would argue are not-so-big wheels, but they're a nice step up from stock and I'm kind of OCD about the ride quality.... I'm excited to hopefully be one of those who exclaims that their new setup is much much better than stock.

BTW - expecting delivery of the Teraflex Rear Tire Carrier upgrade tomorrow. I also think the spare bouncing around on the stock carrier, and so far out from the tailgate with the new offset is contributing to the feel, and not in a good way. Not to mention the strain on the gate and hinges themselves....I picked Terafalex over the Smittybilt specifically because of the adjustable *depth* on the tire mount.
 

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Thanks Shadowmaker and Guzzimoto - I agree and I'm on that same page. The shop that mounted and balanced for me handed over the vehicle with the tires at 50 PSI??!! I knew that couldn't be right.

After getting home I dropped them to 35, and after your comments will go to 30 or even less. And you're further correct in that the new tires are Load rated class E with (I believe) 10 Plies. 35 PSI is where I had my stock Goodyear Wrangler SR-A's - so a little softer may take a little of the edge off.

Thanks very much for the suggestions. This is my first Jeep, first set of what some would argue are not-so-big wheels, but they're a nice step up from stock and I'm kind of OCD about the ride quality.... I'm excited to hopefully be one of those who exclaims that their new setup is much much better than stock.

BTW - expecting delivery of the Teraflex Rear Tire Carrier upgrade tomorrow. I also think the spare bouncing around on the stock carrier, and so far out from the tailgate with the new offset is contributing to the feel, and not in a good way. Not to mention the strain on the gate and hinges themselves....I picked Terafalex over the Smittybilt specifically because of the adjustable *depth* on the tire mount.
For E rated tires, the ride may still be on the rough side. Lookup info on the chalk test where you can see contact points of your tires since you went bigger. Some tire vendors will give you a you a satisfaction warranty and will swap tires if you are unhappy with them (within the contstraint of the warranty). For most an E rated tire is too much for a Wrangler.

Teraflex has a great tire carrier, and the Smitty is not bad either. I feel it has more adjustments than the Teraflex, but a lower overall quality point.
 

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I've had Rancho9000 shocks on my 2015 Rubicon with a 2.5" Rock Krawler lift for four years. I clean the jeep about twice a year. When I rock crawled I would clean, prime, and paint the skids and axles where they got chewed up. The shocks have held up well. I actually adjust the damping on them probably once a month when I hit forest roads in east Tennessee. I run full damp up front (9) and mostly firm in the rear (6 or 7) on the road, and I drop them to full soft (3) all around when I let the tires down to 15psi or so offroad. Some folks have reported the adjustment knob can freeze up from non-use especially in salty areas.


Here's a picture of mine last year after three years of use. I haven't done any rock crawling in the last couple years. It's 95% interstate, 5% mountain roads.

Edit to add: I usually put grease on the lower shock bolts and hardware when I take it apart or at least hit them with lithium grease when I'm cleaning up the jeep. Most of the corrosion seems to be in the lower area where they stay wet. I welded on 1/4" skids for the rear shocks/lower control arm points and front lower control arms.


 

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What is everyone's opinion about Bilstein 5100's?
Firm. I run them and like them. However they do not make a direct replacement shock. Minimum is like 1 to 2" of lift. You could run them but need to set you bump stops accordingly and your uptravel will be limited(but lots of down travel)


BTW.. i run 37's and only run 26 psi per the chalk test. always the 1st thing to do when getting new tires.
 
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