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I would but make sure it's the non-permanent blue formulation of Loctite, not the permanent red version. If you use a torque wrench be sure to reduce the specified ft-lbs. tightness by 20% to compensate for the lubrication quality the Locktite imparts to the bolt threads. That will create the correct clamping force without overstressing/stretching the bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was using the old bolts. I assumed since they were not torque to yield bolts that would not be a problem
 

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I have used red loctite on flywheel bolts dozens of times over the past 30 years and never had any trouble at all removing them when needed.
 

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Most mechanics don't use Locktite,
they check the bolts for thread damage, clean the threads and use a torque wrench.
That's bad advice. First off, manufacturers often say to replace and not reuse critical bolts, such as caliper bracket bolts, and second, said bolts come already coated with Loctite. Using a torque wrench and Loctite isn't mutually exclusive.
 

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Most mechanics don't use Locktite,
they check the bolts for thread damage, clean the threads and use a torque wrench.
I disagree where the flywheel and clutch pressure plate bolts are concerned, they hold spinning assemblies. Like ring gear bolts should always be Loctited.
 

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I have done it both ways, usually, I do not use Locktite on flywheels or pressure plate bolts.

As a former professional mechanic at Ford and a long list of current professional mechanics I know and trust, they seldom ever use Loctite.
With the exception of some manufactures that require head bolts to always be replaced with OEM, they stick with the original bolts and follow the manufactures requirements on thread lubrication necessary for installation.
Manufactures don't cut corners on fasteners and will recommend replacement when it's necessary. With the exception of extreme use, IE dragsters, I have not heard of a bolt failure when properly installed.
 

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I have done it both ways, usually, I do not use Locktite on flywheels or pressure plate bolts.
I'm surprised you admit to that for those particular bolts. I don't use Loctite on everything but I sure do on those bolts, ring gear bolts, etc. A good mechanic should, and even the Mopar Factory Service manual says to use Loctite or similar. Bolts can back out of some rotating assemblies if Loctite is not used on their bolts. I sure would not go back to a mechanic if I knew he didn't bother to use Loctite on such assemblies.

This is one example, in this case for the flywheel, copied out of the FSM...

"Install new attaching bolts whenever the flywheel
is replaced and use Mopar Lock N’ Seal, or Loctite
242 on the replacement bolt threads.
"
 

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I'm surprised you admit to that for those particular bolts. I don't use Loctite on everything but I sure do on those bolts, ring gear bolts, etc. A good mechanic should, and even the Mopar Factory Service manual says to use Loctite or similar. Bolts can back out of some rotating assemblies if Loctite is not used on their bolts. I sure would not go back to a mechanic if I knew he didn't bother to use Loctite on such assemblies.

This is one example, in this case for the flywheel, copied out of the FSM...

"Install new attaching bolts whenever the flywheel
is replaced and use Mopar Lock N’ Seal, or Loctite
242 on the replacement bolt threads.
"
Its an anemic 4 or 6 cylinder Jeep engine that might spin at 4000 rpm for a very brief period. Yes my Ferrari that spins at nearly 9500 rpm, or one of my BBC boat engines that makes power that's unheard of in a Jeep and spin at 4500 to 6000 rpm for long periods of time while bouncing in ruff water. Personally I save Loctite for something important.
 

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Its an anemic 4 or 6 cylinder Jeep engine that might spin at 4000 rpm for a very brief period. Yes my Ferrari that spins at nearly 9500 rpm, or one of my BBC boat engines that makes power that's unheard of in a Jeep and spin at 4500 to 6000 rpm for long periods of time while bouncing in ruff water. Personally I save Loctite for something important.
LOL whatever. I'm just glad you never worked on any of my vehicles.
 

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Thankfully the many many mechanics I know use loctite on unimportant things like jeeps and not just ferraris
 

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Better safe than sorry on using a drop or two of Loctite. Many a ring gear bolt has backed out and caused catastrophic damage. I don't know of a fly wheel bolt backing out but I'm not about find out. I'm going to use Loctite on most things if it can prevent trouble, Blue Loctite anyway. It's not going to hurt anything.
 

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Why would the factory recommend using thread locker? There must be a reason. I doubt that Jeep or FCA owns a thread locker factory, so there must be an engineering reason.
If a mechanic that doesn't use thread locker on flywheel bolts can give me a reason to not follow factory recommendations I'll take that reason under consideration.
Until then, I'll use thread locker when the factory says I should.

"You don't need it" isn't a valid reason. "I've done dozens or hundreds without failure" isn't a reason either. I'd want to hear a reasonable, technical and documented reason to omit thread locker when the FSM clearly states to use it.
Why would I risk failure even if the rate was one in a thousand, when applying a drop of blue Loctite is so easy and inexpensive?

JMHO.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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If you use a torque wrench be sure to reduce the specified ft-lbs. tightness by 20% to compensate for the lubrication quality the Locktite imparts to the bolt threads.
This is one example, in this case for the flywheel, copied out of the FSM...

"Install new attaching bolts whenever the flywheel
is replaced and use Mopar Lock N’ Seal, or Loctite
242 on the replacement bolt threads.
"
When you see a manual advise using Loctite on the same page as the torque spec, do you assume they're giving the spec for use with Loctite, or still take 20% off?
 

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I hate being caught full of beans so I went to my 1987 FSM.
I couldn't find any instructions for flywheel installation other than to use new flywheel to crankshaft bolts and the torque value of 105 ft. lbs. Since I couldn't find flywheel installation instructions, I didn't see where the FSM stated to use or not use thread locker. The only reference to putting anything on a bolt is where the FSM states the torque value of the vibration dampener bolt. The FSM states to lubricate the dampener bolt.
The FSM also calls the flywheel a "drive plate".

I Googled "Torque Wrench Instructions". I didn't find where any website said to lube lug bolts. On the contrary, the websites that said anything said to torque the lug nuts dry.

Other posters that want to spend more time searching through various years of FSMs may find installation instructions for a standard shift flywheel or automatic trans flex plate.
Other posters that want to spend more time rooting through torque websites may find recommendations for or against lubing or thread locking various fasteners.
If anyone finds anything for or against lubing or using thread locker, please post what you find and where you found it.

I'll continue using thread locker on critical fasteners and torquing them.

As an afterthought, I looked in my Chiltons manual. All it says is to tighten the bolts a little at a time in a crossways pattern and gives a torque value. It doesn't mention wet or dry threads nor does it state to use new bolts.

So, there. If you haven't had issues with what you've been doing, keep doing it. If you've had stuff come loose, buy and use a torque wrench. If it still comes loose, use thread locker. If stuff comes loose after all that, get a gym membership and pump some iron.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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A good way to judge the need for Loctite is to look at the Mopar replacement flexplate bolt set that is delivered with blue Loctite. Have replaced 2 sets with OEM and both were coated.
 

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Other posters that want to spend more time searching through various years of FSMs may find installation instructions for a standard shift flywheel or automatic trans flex plate.
Just checked the '04 FSM, which is annoyingly text copy protected...
 

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I have a '87-'88 digital copy of a FSM that was given to me by another forum member. I figured that the later FSMs would have a more detailed flywheel instruction section.
C.L. found the more detailed instructions in his 1994 FSM. Thanks, C.L.

Good Luck, L.M.
 
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