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I have a 2014 Wrangler Unlimited and it has Traction Control. I have no idea how well this works i.e. snow, ice, off-road in mud, on a hill, etc. Anybody have any experience with the traction control?

Thanks!
 

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Best advice is go out and try it. Also read your owners manual about how to turn the traction control off and part off. Ill admit that it is rather impressive and much better than the ATRAC on my previous FJ Cruiser. Granted the traction control is no exception to say a full locker but it works quite well
 

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Best advice is go out and try it.
Don't I wish! Unfortunately, I don't have a convenient place to try it - yet - hopefully that will change before long.

...Ill admit that it is rather impressive and much better than the ATRAC on my previous FJ Cruiser. Granted the traction control is no exception to say a full locker but it works quite well
Interesting, thanks!
 

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Yes....go try it (if you can find some snow or ice).


I personally hate traction control devices....but with good tires, it can help get you going.
 

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Are you referring to the traction control, or the brake assist thing that helps if one of your wheels has no traction? ( Brake lock diff or soemthing like that )
The traction control feels pretty standard to me. On the ice it came on quite frequently.
 

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Are you referring to the traction control, or the brake assist thing that helps if one of your wheels has no traction? ( Brake lock diff or soemthing like that )
The traction control feels pretty standard to me. On the ice it came on quite frequently.
A lot of people use the same term for the two systems....and they are actually part of the same system.

But yes, BLD (Brake Lock Differential) has different programming than traction control....even if they operate the same way. BLD is the more aggressive off-road version of traction control.

Then you get into TCS vs ESP vs ERM vs BLD etc....
 

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they work great in the city not so great in a mud hole where you want to spin to clean the tread.....Also I have found that some times pulling out on a low traction side road on to a main road can be a drag as the vehicle wants to bog instead of accelerate.
 

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they work great in the city not so great in a mud hole where you want to spin to clean the tread.....Also I have found that some times pulling out on a low traction side road on to a main road can be a drag as the vehicle wants to bog instead of accelerate.
That is without a doubt my #1 absolute hatred of traction control....and that bogging down came close to getting me in an accident several times in my Libby. The traction control would kick in and kill my momentum.
 

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That is without a doubt my #1 absolute hatred of traction control....and that bogging down came close to getting me in an accident several times in my Libby. The traction control would kick in and kill my momentum.
mine too.
 

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not so great in a mud hole where you want to spin to clean the tread
id say it depends on the situation your in. keep in mind you can turn the traction control off or partly off for greater wheel spin. take this video for example. this was a couple weeks ago on a goof off kinda sunday. the rover was on street tires and flat out stuck, the geo was on 31" tsl, and my JK not aired down, open diffs, with the factory traction control, and in low range (3.23 gears on 35" tires so everything is low range for me until i regear) you can see that all four tires are pulling on mine

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRDnswpKx3Y
 

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pretty sure 4lo kills the traction control or at least it does on the rubicons.

all should spin as long as the traction is pretty much the same which looked like was the case.
 

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going from the owners manual pdf file

"when in ESC Off mode, ESC and TCS, except for the "limited slip" feature described in the TCS section, are turned off."
 

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ESC is stability (keeps you from sliding/spinning side ways)
TCS is traction (makes sure both wheels on a given axle spin at the same speed)

The "limited slip" feature they describe is BLD, which has its own algorithm for off-road use.

In a Rubi, when the lockers are engaged, the render BLD useless.
 

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That is without a doubt my #1 absolute hatred of traction control....and that bogging down came close to getting me in an accident several times in my Libby. The traction control would kick in and kill my momentum.
Is that what that is? Never noticed the light come on but I've noticed a few times the Jeep seems to bog and come to think of it, I might have been coming off a gravel road onto pavement. I'll have to look next time for the indicator light. Could just be me getting used to a new vehicle and the accelerator too (it's only three weeks old).

Kind of like the faint foghorn noise when I shut off my engine. I know it's just something shutting down but it sounds like I'm at the Shark Tank in San Jose and somebody scored a goal. My son thought that too. Jeeps!
 

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Is that what that is? Never noticed the light come on but I've noticed a few times the Jeep seems to bog and come to think of it, I might have been coming off a gravel road onto pavement. I'll have to look next time for the indicator light. Could just be me getting used to a new vehicle and the accelerator too (it's only three weeks old).

Kind of like the faint foghorn noise when I shut off my engine. I know it's just something shutting down but it sounds like I'm at the Shark Tank in San Jose and somebody scored a goal. My son thought that too. Jeeps!
It might be....
The problem for me was in winter time, when I would turn onto a fast moving road....especially on an incline. If you are on the throttle and get wheelspin on gravel, your traction control will kick in and apply the brakes to the spinning wheel.
 

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Kind of like the faint foghorn noise when I shut off my engine. I know it's just something shutting down but it sounds like I'm at the Shark Tank in San Jose and somebody scored a goal. My son thought that too. Jeeps!
Huh... I've never thought of it like that before. I know exactly what you are talking about though. There sure have been a lot of fog horns going off at the shark tank tonight.
 

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Good, so now I know I'm not insane. Someone else here's it. Son doesn't count, same DNA ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Guys, I think there's some confusion about this TC (Traction Control) 'bog' thing. Let's say we don't have TC first. If we lose traction on one wheel and it's essentially free spinning, we are 'bogged' right then. If we're pulling off from a stop and one wheel free spins, we won't go anywhere, so again we're bogged.

What I'm thinking here is that the TC is getting blamed for something that it didn't cause for, and it is in fact, trying to overcome the problem. I think we lose traction on one wheel, the vehicle slows down, as it would even without TC, and we look down and see the TC engaged and blame the TC for the 'bog' when the bog was actually caused by the loss of traction.

Actually TC does cause a bog, but once understood, I think it can be easily resolved. The braking of the spinning wheel absorbs engine power/torque, so yes the vehicle is going to slow down UNLESS, we then respond with more power, as indicated in this video:

This video compares open diffs without TC, open diffs with TC, and then lockers. Of course we know the lockers are going to perform the best, but this is an actual indication of performance - pretty interesting! Might as well skip to the 1:00 mark for the actual test:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNFacsKnswM

Since I started this thread, found some demo vids that are helpful and pretty much answered my questions about TC's effectiveness.

E.g. I saw one YT vid where a guy blamed TC for a buddy failing to climb a 'loose' hill. He talked about the loss of power. What makes the TC kick in is the detection of wheel spin. If we have wheel spin we have already lost power and traction - the TC hasn't even kicked in yet! So probably, this guy was on a hill that his open diffs wouldn't climb and when it wouldn't, the Jeep stopped due to loss of traction, the TC tried to improve traction and the guy looks down and sees the TC engaged and blames the TC.

The TC has to detect the spinning wheel and activate the brake on that side in an attempt to direct power to the non-spinning wheel. It just seems to me like he was already in the failure mode when the TC kicked in and tried to improve traction.

Here are a couple of vids on YT that demonstrate TC. In this one, there's a lot of 'demo time' showing conventional open diffs trying to negotiate the hill unsuccessfully and then at 2:20 it shows a Jeep with TC and you can clearly see the TC engages and reduces wheel spin.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_mJiYlIIpE

This is an excellent demo of the TC in action. Notice in his brief description about how TC works, there is no mention of throttle modulation, but I think I read somewhere it may modulate the throttle some as well. Keep in mind this is circa 2007 and the control algorithm could be improved by now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hv2DKDinfj0

and another:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kd8zTdo_MJM

There's another that actually measured the progress of a open, TC, and locker, but I couldn't find it this morning.

What I get from all this is that TC is likely getting blamed for traction/power loss that it had nothing to do with. The power/traction is lost before the TC can go active. In an article by a Jeep engineer, "Jeep Brake Traction Control Explained" he makes no mention of the throttle being reduced by the TC. In fact, it would be counter-productive. He explains in the article that one drawback of TC is that it requires twice as much torque to drive the opposite wheel in order to overcome the braking on the spinning wheel. That may explain that 'bogging' sense. You just push the accelerator more to provide more torque.

It appears, and corroborated by that elusive video I can't find, that TC performance lies just about half way between open diffs and lockers.

TC is reactive. I.e. it reacts to an existing, detected condidtion of wheel spin, be it the dreaded diagonal trap or simply low traction on one wheel. Sometimes TC is successful and sometimes it's too late because we're already stopped or slowed to a point that recovery is not possible.

Lockers are preventive and are not reactive to an existing condition.

My conclusion is that TC generally improves traction, especially better than an open diff, but it is not a substitute, nor as effective as lockers. But if one is not going to be doing hard core off-roading, the TC might save the cost of a locker(s).
 

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It doesn't have to be off road or snow or ice to induce the TC....however FWIW the Bog that we feel comes from our being "Used to" the fact that during a "Hard accelaration", we expect a little wheel spin, and know that it will pass and we will keep moving. And that even when that wheel is spinning we are moving and gaining speed. So once that TC kicks on, yes it truly does "slow down" bog may be the wrong term for it.

My experience comes from driving my TJ probably 65-70% of the time to work. And when leaving the industrial complex you are pulling on to a fairly busy highway, in a "cold" vehicle at rush hour, and crossing 2 East bound lanes a North turn lane and at least a South turn lane, into a west bound lane (possibly 2 West bound lanes your choice). With the winter we had, there is still plenty of gravel/ sand, loose debris on the pavement that traction can be "sketchy" depending where you put the skinny pedal down. I am used to it in the TJ. Drove the '12 JK the other day and yep TC kicked on for (to me no reason I could "feel") but can only assume there had been some wheel slip, in the TJ no big deal no TC, but yeah gave me a "Huh didn't expect that" moment.
 
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