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Hi guys I’m new here and I’m Looking to get some help, please. Im looking at a 2018 Jk Rubicon 2drs. Here is the breakdown:
Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 24R package , 5 speed automatic transmision, alpine premium 9apeakers/subwoofer, 4.10 gear ratio, cold weather group and connectivity group.
Total invoice: $ 38936

I received an offer of 5% off from the dealer
The net price it will be $36.989 plus tax tag/title and documentation fee.

How it looks?

Thank you in advance

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I'm not sure what the 24R package includes(?), but I'd maybe try to work them closer to $35K...that's kind of where we were on the new 2 door JK Jeep we bought last month.
 

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Or use an online service like TrueCar. I bought my 2016 Hard Rock for just a hair under 40K. No hassles, no sales people. Just write the check and drive away.
 

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I followed this thread and factory ordered from the DC dealership (Feb 2017). My local dealer would only go 1% under invoice and I got 6% under invoice (2017), they offer 5% under now. I was also lucky and received a $500 incentive/golden ticket. 3 weeks from order date to delivery, my husband and I were very happy with the process. My friend even reached out to me and wound up ordering from them also late 2017 because it was the best deal and he was also happy with the process and happy with the savings.
:iamhappy:
 

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Cash is no longer king...did absolutely zero for me.
Any dealer that has it's own finance dept HATES cash. Outside of buying from a mom and pop used car shop, that doesn't really help their business. In fact sometimes going on credit then immediately paying it off (make sure no pre-pay penalties) can save you a few bucks.

I worked for a short while at a dealer for a summer, and the the worst buyer is one who buys every 3 years and pays cash. Had a handful of farmers who would do that when the work trucks got all their rebates. And that meant no extended warranty and no financing.
 

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Not Jeep related, but a friend of mine bought a loaded F150 Crew Cab that had an MSRP of $55k ... out the door... for only $30k. He did so using multiple car buying services and slowly whittling them down to where only two remained and the dealers basically war with each other until you accept the final one. Wonder if the same thing would work with a Jeep Wrangler.
Somewhat. On new cars there's not a whole lot of wiggle room for the most part. Most new cars the dealer isn't making much. Forbes did a report a couple years ago that Dealers made $65 in net profit a car for a new car sale. There's the commission to the sales guy (usually 200-300 on a mini, or the least he can get). There's the interest the dealer has racked up on those cars (they are buying them on loans for the most part just like a person), the overhead of running the dealership etc.

There's the discounts from the manufacturer when the new models hit the floor, especially if it's a redesign. But that is from the maker (if Jeep can't move the 2018's they can't sell the 2019's to their dealerships). Outside of that, unless the dealer is willing to lose money to move the vehicle, they have a pretty slim margin. Most money is made on selling used cars, buying trade-ins, finance, service, extra's (clear car bra, different tires/wheels, bedliners, aftermarket parts), and extended warranties.

Put it this way. I only worked for a summer selling cars but took me two sales to see where I'd be steering people. Sold a brand new Silverado, nicely loaded, $50k truck, and got a $250 mini commission. Sold a 5 year old Denali, and got a $2500 commission. We had a handful of slow sellers on the new car lot that we could get bigger commissions on, but unless someone was adamant they had to have a new car, I didn't show them one.

Unless a dealer thinks it's worth losing money to move the car, or isn't showing the actual rebates and discounts the manufacturer is giving them, there's not much room.

And if you by, put some $ down, try to not go over 48 months on a loan (and I wouldn't go over 36 months on a nearly new one), and head to a bank and get you a loan first so you walk in with something.

You might get a new car loan at say 4.0% The dealer may have been wanting to give you an offer in finance for 4.5% when they are paying 3.8% to get you that loan. They make a nice profit on that interest there. If you bring that 4.0% loan paper, they most likely will offer you 3.9% instead, still making them a few bucks and saving you enough to stay (they go through dozens of companies to get the best deal, so your bank may be best for a 50 yo buying a luxury sedan, but a 30 yo buying a Jeep is best with another bank).
 

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Somewhat. On new cars there's not a whole lot of wiggle room for the most part. Most new cars the dealer isn't making much. Forbes did a report a couple years ago that Dealers made $65 in net profit a car for a new car sale. There's the commission to the sales guy (usually 200-300 on a mini, or the least he can get). There's the interest the dealer has racked up on those cars (they are buying them on loans for the most part just like a person), the overhead of running the dealership etc.

There's the discounts from the manufacturer when the new models hit the floor, especially if it's a redesign. But that is from the maker (if Jeep can't move the 2018's they can't sell the 2019's to their dealerships). Outside of that, unless the dealer is willing to lose money to move the vehicle, they have a pretty slim margin. Most money is made on selling used cars, buying trade-ins, finance, service, extra's (clear car bra, different tires/wheels, bedliners, aftermarket parts), and extended warranties.

Put it this way. I only worked for a summer selling cars but took me two sales to see where I'd be steering people. Sold a brand new Silverado, nicely loaded, $50k truck, and got a $250 mini commission. Sold a 5 year old Denali, and got a $2500 commission. We had a handful of slow sellers on the new car lot that we could get bigger commissions on, but unless someone was adamant they had to have a new car, I didn't show them one.

Unless a dealer thinks it's worth losing money to move the car, or isn't showing the actual rebates and discounts the manufacturer is giving them, there's not much room.

And if you by, put some $ down, try to not go over 48 months on a loan (and I wouldn't go over 36 months on a nearly new one), and head to a bank and get you a loan first so you walk in with something.

You might get a new car loan at say 4.0% The dealer may have been wanting to give you an offer in finance for 4.5% when they are paying 3.8% to get you that loan. They make a nice profit on that interest there. If you bring that 4.0% loan paper, they most likely will offer you 3.9% instead, still making them a few bucks and saving you enough to stay (they go through dozens of companies to get the best deal, so your bank may be best for a 50 yo buying a luxury sedan, but a 30 yo buying a Jeep is best with another bank).

So it sounds like somone with a nice trade-in (low mileage modded out Jeep) should be in the drivers seat because the salesman is going to make a lot more money on your trade-in.
This is why I didnt trade my Jeep in.
I knew they were going to make $3000-$5,000 off of me.
 

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I'm sure it take much to keep your old Jeep and get the new one.... ha ha

Most people here older than 40 have a few Jeeps.
Yeah I am not selling my Jeep again..
Been there done that.
I will buy new after I pay this one off.
This is my 2nd Jeep.
 
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