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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a two door JK with a Teraflex 2.5" JKU lift. Yes, I put the JKU lift on my JK because the springs are supposed to be stiffer. I did this to gain more lift, and because I camp a lot with a heavy load in the back. My problem now is, for some reason in the recent past, it seems that even not loaded, the springs have settled in the rear to give me a slightly negative rake. I've measured to confirm that it's about 1/4" lower in the back. I'm kinda perplexed because the heavier springs with the kit I got I assumed would make up for a heavy load, let alone an empty load. I do have a 35" Cooper STT spare, but that should not make it squat that much. My body weight alone on the bumper lowers it approximately 1/2 to 3/4".

Obviously I can add like 3/4'" spacers, but is it normal for these to settle out that disproportional? I have a steel bumper in the front and back, so the front should be similar in added weight when you compare the rear steel bumper and heavier tire in the rear.

Anyone else have this issue? It's mostly a problem when I'm loaded down headed to camp at night, and I have to adjust my headlights every damn time. Any solutions?
 

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You can always find a set of airbags that fit inside the coil spring. Load up the Jeep and then pump up the air bags so it's level or more.
 

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You can always find a set of airbags that fit inside the coil spring. Load up the Jeep and then pump up the air bags so it's level or more.
That sounds like a good solution for OP! The Air Springs are good because you can level the rig when it's loaded and when it's unloaded.

OP, let me know if you have any questions or if you'd like a quote on anything!

-Ryan
 

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Thanks guys, that's a damn good solution. Ryan, that $97 system is all I would need besides a compressor? The installation looks incredibly easy too.

Shoot me a PM on a price for that system.

Thanks,
Chad
 

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I have that system plus the Wireless air compressor system tucked in between the front frame rails behind the bumper.

I like that it automatically (ignition switched) checks pressure and keeps them at 5psi when unloaded because if you don't maintain the 5psi minimum the bags can wear and fail.

You will have to measure your springs then call Air Lift to get the proper size air bags since you're not stock anymore and will most probably require slightly longer bags..
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I have that system plus the Wireless air compressor system tucked in between the front frame rails behind the bumper. I like that it automatically (ignition switched) checks pressure and keeps them at 5psi when unloaded because if you don't maintain the 5psi minimum the bags can wear and fail. You will have to measure your springs then call Air Lift to get the proper size air bags since you're not stock anymore and will most probably require slightly longer bags..
I appreciate that info. I was about to buy that kit without thinking about needing longer bags. That sounds like an ideal system, but $700?! Dang
 

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Do air bag springs even hold up under articulation? I would expect that under full flex the bags would get shredded.

Most pickups don't have 8 inches of travel in the rear.
 

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Do air bag springs even hold up under articulation? I would expect that under full flex the bags would get shredded.

Most pickups don't have 8 inches of travel in the rear.
I did some field testing with another company's airbags years ago on my 2008 2-door and destroyed 3 sets of bags in moderate offroading.

This was my set-up at the time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7XqK6OYDaI
 

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Thanks guys, that's a damn good solution. Ryan, that $97 system is all I would need besides a compressor? The installation looks incredibly easy too.

Shoot me a PM on a price for that system.

Thanks,
Chad
As long as you can regulate the pressure in the bags through a regulator, all you need is a compressor to make it work. The complete systems are great but a little pricey. I'll shoot you a PM with a quote on the bags now.

-Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did some field testing with another company's airbags years ago on my 2008 2-door and destroyed 3 sets of bags in moderate offroading. This was my set-up at the time. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7XqK6OYDaI
Wow, thats good to know. I do have intentions of adding a trailer, but for now I just have a hitch carrier. The trails going into most of the camps around me are much worse than that road you are on so that's a bit concerning.
 

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Wow, thats good to know. I do have intentions of adding a trailer, but for now I just have a hitch carrier. The trails going into most of the camps around me are much worse than that road you are on so that's a bit concerning.
The whoop-dee-dooos on that road were about 3' back and forth when it was at its worst. The video was shot in a better area to demo the MaxxCoupler (my wife was running alongside the Jeep).
It was flexing but not crazy. But it always pinched the bags and burst them. They were Firestone, btw.
 

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Everyone I have ever known with air bags raved about them for the first year and then went straight to bitching about them having leaks there after.
 

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I've also considered a coil spring booster. They're temporary and you can install them when you're loaded down and remove them when you're unloaded. I haven't run them so maybe someone with experience can tell us how they work. I would be considering them to take up some of the sag from my plow.

-Ryan
 

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Two other alternatives:

1. Air shocks. These are regular shock absorbers with an air valve in them. Use a normal air compressor to add air to them (just like a tire) to increase the load carrying capacity of the existing suspension. I had these on an old 77 Chevy station wagon and they worked reasonably well. I don't know how easy it is to find shocks like this these days but they would be easy to install.

2. Nitrogen charged shocks. These "air shocks" actually replace the coil spring and traditional shock absorber. You adjust the nitrogen charge with very high pressure nitrogen from a tank and the pressure determines the spring rate. You do have to make sure the mounts for the shock can carry the weight of the Jeep so a little custom fabrication is involved when installing them. But they do work great as well.
 

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A third alternative would be to find custom progressive rate springs. They're a little softer at first but once you start to load them down they get stiffer to carry more weight without sagging as much as a single rate spring.

And, of course, you can do a progressive spring pair if you want to swap over to coil-overs (similar setup fabrication to nitrogen charged air shocks).
 

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Or put the 3/4" pucks in and declare victory...
 
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