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Discussion Starter #1
One more question for the day. Is there any obvious reason my steering wheel is binding when I'm turning in 4wd???
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm on pavement. I heard a whining noise in the trans and put in 4 hi just to see that made a difference. Now the steering is binding bad when I turn hard
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It doesn't do it in 2wd
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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EDIT: (took too long to write this, peple already provided information hehe)

The quick answer would be that you have too much traction.

Turning in 4wd mode can only be done on loose surface (sand/gravel/snow/loose dirt/mud/etc...)

If you are on pavement, the steering wheel will not be willing to turn.

If you need an longer explanation here it is
- When turning a corner, the rear wheels travel less than the front wheels. (when doing a hard right turn for instance, the rear wheels almost do not move, but the front wheels travel a lot)
- When driving in 4wd, the rear driveshaft is locked with the front driveshaft and both of them must turn at the same rate
- If the rear wheels move less than the front wheels, the rear driveshaft must make less rotation than the front driveshaft (there is no differential in the transfer case, front and back are locked together)
- In low traction situations (snow for instance), the rear wheels, will just spin freely to compensate (or the front wheel can spin the excess too, depends on if there is less traction on front or rear wheels, usually it's the rear since there is less weight on them)
- But in high traction surfaces, the rear wheels cannot spin at all. So there is a "battle" on all the driving components to see who will lose. The weakest link in that system, are the steering components so they are the one that are forced to straighten out to make the front wheels and rear wheels turn equally.
- If you try to hold really hard the steering wheel turned, something else will fail, and you do not want that. If the rear wheels can NOT spin to compensate and you lock the steering wheel in a hard turn, something will have to break and it will be costly.

So my advice, do not use 4WD when turning if you are not sure if you are not sure if the traction is low enough. Anyway, if you are not sure that you can turn safely in 4wd drive, you do not need 4wd.

I drive ibn a lot of snow here, and I am often in 4wd, but when I have to make 90 degree turns (stop sign, etc...) I put it in 2wd just before the turn, turn it slowly, and put it back in 4wd as soon as I am back in a straight line. If there is heavy snow where I am turning and 2wd is not enough, back in 4wd (or I simply never put it in 2wd if I can see the heavy snow ahead and the heavy snow will provide the loose traction needed
 

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Discussion Starter #8
EDIT: (took too long to write this, peple already provided information hehe)

The quick answer would be that you have too much traction.

Turning in 4wd mode can only be done on loose surface (sand/gravel/snow/loose dirt/mud/etc...)

If you are on pavement, the steering wheel will not be willing to turn.

If you need an longer explanation here it is
- When turning a corner, the rear wheels travel less than the front wheels. (when doing a hard right turn for instance, the rear wheels almost do not move, but the front wheels travel a lot)
- When driving in 4wd, the rear driveshaft is locked with the front driveshaft and both of them must turn at the same rate
- If the rear wheels move less than the front wheels, the rear driveshaft must make less rotation than the front driveshaft (there is no differential in the transfer case, front and back are locked together)
- In low traction situations (snow for instance), the rear wheels, will just spin freely to compensate (or the front wheel can spin the excess too, depends on if there is less traction on front or rear wheels, usually it's the rear since there is less weight on them)
- But in high traction surfaces, the rear wheels cannot spin at all. So there is a "battle" on all the driving components to see who will lose. The weakest link in that system, are the steering components so they are the one that are forced to straighten out to make the front wheels and rear wheels turn equally.
- If you try to hold really hard the steering wheel turned, something else will fail, and you do not want that. If the rear wheels can NOT spin to compensate and you lock the steering wheel in a hard turn, something will have to break and it will be costly.

So my advice, do not use 4WD when turning if you are not sure if you are not sure if the traction is low enough. Anyway, if you are not sure that you can turn safely in 4wd drive, you do not need 4wd.

I drive ibn a lot of snow here, and I am often in 4wd, but when I have to make 90 degree turns (stop sign, etc...) I put it in 2wd just before the turn, turn it slowly, and put it back in 4wd as soon as I am back in a straight line. If there is heavy snow where I am turning and 2wd is not enough, back in 4wd (or I simply never put it in 2wd if I can see the heavy snow ahead and the heavy snow will provide the loose traction needed
Thanks, that makes sense. I'm just having this problem with trans/transfer case and I thought, Oh shit...what now.
 
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