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2020 JLUR 2.0 Auto, 3.5” MC GC Lift, 37” MT Baja Boss MY. 1982 DJ5 4wd LS NP465 “Gone Postal”
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46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I own a 2018 Golden Eagle JKU and LOVE the factory wheels. I’m running 37x12.5 inch ridge grapplers though with a Metal Cloak lift. Also of course having to use spacers. (This is NOT a spacer debate thread, thx!)

My question to y’all is: What are the real advantages to aftermarket wheels besides not having to run spacers? Does an 8.5-9” width as opposed to my 7.5” width make that big of a difference too my 37’s and if so how? They seem to be performing fine....4 off-road trips and 10k miles so far with the stock wheel / 37 tire combo.

Thanks!
 

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A tire that wide is typically not made to fit on a 7.5" wide rim. Every tire is designed to fit a certain range of rim widths. And most every 12.5" wide tire I have seen is not made to fit a rim that narrow. And some tire shops won't mount a tire that wide on a rim that narrow. When mounted on that rim it will pinch the tires sidewalls in a little more than the tire designers intended. That may cause the sidewalls to flex beyond the design parameters. Will it work? Sure. Will it fail? Probably not. But it is arguably not going to work as designed. I doubt you will notice much of a difference, if any. But it isn't right, from a design perspective and a legal perspective.
 

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2020 JLUR 2.0 Auto, 3.5” MC GC Lift, 37” MT Baja Boss MY. 1982 DJ5 4wd LS NP465 “Gone Postal”
Joined
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46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A tire that wide is typically not made to fit on a 7.5" wide rim. Every tire is designed to fit a certain range of rim widths. And most every 12.5" wide tire I have seen is not made to fit a rim that narrow. And some tire shops won't mount a tire that wide on a rim that narrow. When mounted on that rim it will pinch the tires sidewalls in a little more than the tire designers intended. That may cause the sidewalls to flex beyond the design parameters. Will it work? Sure. Will it fail? Probably not. But it is arguably not going to work as designed. I doubt you will notice much of a difference, if any. But it isn't right, from a design perspective and a legal perspective.
Thanks for the responses. That’s my only argument against them as well. Just not sure it’s enough to make me buy new wheels that I don’t even like as much as my OEMs. Ha.
 

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Lay a tire on its side and step on the sidewall. The tread bows out as the sidewalls are squeezed together. The same thing happens with a rim which is too skinny.


Use a rim too narrow for the rubber and the tread gets slightly deformed. Instead of sitting flat as it was designed to do, it kind of bows out the tread as the sidewalls get squeezed together. Now whether that ends up working out to uneven treadwear depends on the pressure that you run, alignment... and a million other things, but the potential is there.
 
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