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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many of you guys and gals have wheeled your vehicle in its stock condition?

What model do you have (JKS, JKUS, JKR, JKUR, etc)?

What kind of wheeling did you do (light trail, difficult trails, rocks, etc)?

What kind of problems did you encounter?

What is the one modification you wish you had while on the trail?
 

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Yes, definitely. Sig has my details. I'd say light to moderate trails, we explore the desert out here, the trails are well established and the hazards are fairly minimal.

Didn't encounter any problems, no mods wanted or needed for our purposes.
 

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Stock 2014 JKUR. Only a little mud so far but plan on running stock this summer to see what mods I need/want.
 

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Was watching a jeep lamborie video and there was a stock JKU rubi that ran the rubicon trail with only 33" tires. Made it through with some minor skid plate damage.
 

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I do not wheel a stock Wrangler but I do take a lot of new Wrangler owners on trail rides. My suggestions are usually this;
1. Get yourself a First Aid kit
2. Get yourself some recovery gear
a. Tow strap
b. Gloves
c. Shackles
d. Winch if you can afford it
You can also just buy a kit from ARB or AEV or whomever you like and trust.
3. Familiarize yourself with your vehicle and how the offroading system works
4. Meet offroaders willing to take you on some trail runs that seem harder than you think your vehicle can do.
5. Get a CB radio or some walkie talkies

Then I usually go into a thing about you will know when you need to upgrade because you will be stuck without the ability to move forward. At that point, upgrade whatever is making your forward progress impossible. Have fun and learn how your Jeep works and it will take you to some amazing places.
 

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I do not wheel a stock Wrangler but I do take a lot of new Wrangler owners on trail rides. My suggestions are usually this;
1. Get yourself a First Aid kit
2. Get yourself some recovery gear
a. Tow strap
b. Gloves
c. Shackles
d. Winch if you can afford it
You can also just buy a kit from ARB or AEV or whomever you like and trust.
3. Familiarize yourself with your vehicle and how the offroading system works
4. Meet offroaders willing to take you on some trail runs that seem harder than you think your vehicle can do.
5. Get a CB radio or some walkie talkies

Then I usually go into a thing about you will know when you need to upgrade because you will be stuck without the ability to move forward. At that point, upgrade whatever is making your forward progress impossible. Have fun and learn how your Jeep works and it will take you to some amazing places.
GOOD Advice....
 

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'12 JK Sport, so babby wheels/tires. I took a fun trip with some locals through the snow. The tires did much better than expected...I only got stuck enough to need winching out once. A better-shoed Comanche was left behind because he couldn't get through it at all. It does fine on basic dirt trails. I'm not big into rocks, but I seriously doubt I'd have much luck with these tires, especially since they're getting a bit worn down.

Edit: I've got a first aid kid, fire extinguisher, and a tow strap.
 

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^^^^^Excellent advise. I ignored everyone who said "you have to do x and x to wheel your Jeep. I have a stock TJ on 31's and wheel it every other weekend. I go places that surprise me. I'm learning my Jeep and how to pick lines and control her in tough situations. When I do build her I will do it much differently than I would have before I just went out and learned what she is capable of as is.
 

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Depends on what you mean by "wheel". Everyone probably has a different definition. I don't do much wheeling, but on light trails, my stock Sahara is great. It was even decent in the one thing I said I'd never do again (from my prior vehicle)....mud.

BTW, I will NEVER do mud again....again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Depends on what you mean by "wheel". Everyone probably has a different definition. I don't do much wheeling, but on light trails, my stock Sahara is great. It was even decent in the one thing I said I'd never do again (from my prior vehicle)....mud. BTW, I will NEVER do mud again....again.
Never say never! ;)

Agreed that wheeling means something different to everyone... Figured they could share however they saw fit. :)

I like hearing the stories about being on the trails and the type of terrain and the difficulties encountered, etc.
 

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I do mostly national forest roads and trails around home in southern West Virginia. Here are some pics from day before yesterday. Mostly just rutted out two tracks with some creek crossings and mud holes. I avoided the deeper stuff where there were already bypass trails. I figured if the bypass is already there it probably means someone has gotten stuck and since I haven't found a wheeling buddy yet I'm flying solo. Not really where you wanna get stuck. BTW, I'm running a stock(other than cosmetics) '14 JKU Sahara with the Rubicon wheels and tires. Never even used 4L.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I do mostly national forest roads and trails around home in southern West Virginia. Here are some pics from day before yesterday. Mostly just rutted out two tracks with some creek crossings and mud holes. I avoided the deeper stuff where there were already bypass trails. I figured if the bypass is already there it probably means someone has gotten stuck and since I haven't found a wheeling buddy yet I'm flying solo. Not really where you wanna get stuck. BTW, I'm running a stock(other than cosmetics) '14 JKU Sahara with the Rubicon wheels and tires. Never even used 4L.
That looks like a ton of fun! Thanks for sharing.

I was originally planning to do a lift and bigger tires but I don't think I'll really need that for what I want to do. Stock seems to go through a lot.
 

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people wheeled for a long time in stock jeeps/scouts/blazers and broncos.. and somehow managed to get it done. I think for most the lifted/big tires is simply a style statement, they see the rock crawlers, mud boggers and 'monster trucks' and say ooh that looks cool.

If you need more ground clearance then maybe you need bigger tires (or maybe you need portal axles). If not it seems like a waste of money to me.
 

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We do mostly rocks out here in So Cal. Done a lot bigger than this picture. Factory skids work pretty well also.
:beerdrinking:

Wheelin Pic.jpg
 

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people wheeled for a long time in stock jeeps/scouts/blazers and broncos.. and somehow managed to get it done. I think for most the lifted/big tires is simply a style statement, they see the rock crawlers, mud boggers and 'monster trucks' and say ooh that looks cool.

If you need more ground clearance then maybe you need bigger tires (or maybe you need portal axles). If not it seems like a waste of money to me.
I saw a video recently from the late 60's. I was a group running the Rubicon in stock early 50's Jeeps, most with 4 or 5 people in them bouncing all over the place. Great stuff.
 

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Unless it's a Rubi the only major issue with a stock Jeep is the factory tires. Unless the trail is highly technical the weakest link will be the skill of the driver.

Driving it stock and avoiding damage is one of the best ways to build off road driving skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I do not wheel a stock Wrangler but I do take a lot of new Wrangler owners on trail rides. My suggestions are usually this;
1. Get yourself a First Aid kit
2. Get yourself some recovery gear
a. Tow strap
b. Gloves
c. Shackles
d. Winch if you can afford it
You can also just buy a kit from ARB or AEV or whomever you like and trust.
3. Familiarize yourself with your vehicle and how the offroading system works
4. Meet offroaders willing to take you on some trail runs that seem harder than you think your vehicle can do.
5. Get a CB radio or some walkie talkies

Then I usually go into a thing about you will know when you need to upgrade because you will be stuck without the ability to move forward. At that point, upgrade whatever is making your forward progress impossible. Have fun and learn how your Jeep works and it will take you to some amazing places.
Thanks for the list! I have everything on it except for the medical kit (which I'm getting soon) and winch. I plan on only wheeling if I have buddy though (with tow hooks, etc) so probably can forgo on the winch for now but I do have that on the list for the future.

Installed the CB Radio last week... been listening to the truckers on the way to and from work :)
 
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