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So I'm trying to make my jeeps oil leak stop. It seemed be coming from the rear main seal so I replaced that! While I was there figured I would replace tranny pan gasket and oil pan gasket! Got it all back together and filled with fluid put 6 quarts of tranny fluid in. Straight six with auto tranny 1990 and turned it on to idle and check leaks and tranny fluid came out of the bell housing!!!! Shut it off got mad threw a wrench drank a beer read up on it found nothing. Tried it again and no more leak!!! Hmmmmm yup it's a jeep thing but why??? So checking over my work and other then that all seemed dry. Drove it around the yard came back and oil appears to be coming from the distributor area !!! So any ideas on the tranny fluid leak and what am I up against with changing the distributer thanks in advance
 

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When I had a leak in that area it was coming from the oil dipstick tube due to a PCV system error. Is your valve cover breathing system correct?
 

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Mine was the oil pressure sending unit coming from the area of the distributor.
 

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Degrease and dye. Get a few (3-4) cans of engine degreaser and spend an hour spraying down the engine and tranny, then rinse with a garden hose.

Get UV dyes for the trans and engine. Start it up and use a UV light to see the leaks.
 

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OP is from Main. I think summer comes late there.
MudMagnetYJ suggests spraying some engine cleaner and then hitting it with a garden hose. Here in Colorado we get a lot of sunny days this time of year. I like a pressure washer.

What I do is go to the quarter car wash on a bright sunny day (if the car wash has hot water so much the better). By driving to the car wash, the engine should be warm. Remove the air cleaner and tape a baggie over the carburetor opening. Then cover the distributor with a gallon baggie and tape it shut. It won't hurt to cover the alternator too. Use one can of engine cleaner on each side of the engine from the top. Get the back and front as best you can.
Lay a piece of cardboard on the deck and hit both sides of the transmission and transfer case with the other two cans. As you spray the cleaner underneath, try to get some on the back of the engine and on the bottom of the Jeep floor.

It's best to do this on a weekday when the car wash isn't too busy. Once you've waited for the cleaner to soak into the crud (follow the instructions on the can), Load the machine with quarters and blast away. I usually plan on dropping $5.00 to $8.00 in quarters. $10.00 won't be out of line if the engine has a lot of buildup. Even though you have the distributor covered, try not to spray directly at or on it. Once you think you're done, remove the baggies and start the Jeep.

If it starts, run it out of the wash bay and replace the air cleaner.
If it doesn't start, remove the distributor cap and wipe it dry with a paper towel or a shop rag.
I've even gone so far as to spray starting fluid in the cap and the timer base inside the distributor to dry it out. I DON'T recommend this though. If all the starting fluid doesn't evaporate before replacing the cap, you may blow up your distributor and start a fire under your hood.
You don't want to burn up your nice newly cleaned engine. A good alternative is to go to a computer store and buy a can of compressed air that geeks use to clean inside computers. If you get water inside your distributor, the compressed air can help to dry it out.

After you have driven the Jeep home, park it and place a sheet of cardboard underneath. With the engine clean and dry (it should have dried out on the way home), you should be able to spot any leaks.

To answer your question about the tranny leak, how certain are you that you didn't overfill it? Does the jeep drive and shift as it's supposed to?

I don't know how common oil leaks are at the distributor. There should be a thin paper washer on the boss where the distributor sits.

Jay and Sarah both mention the PCV. I think it's worth checking it out. You may have excessive crankcase pressure.

Let us know what you find.

BTW, take a screwdriver and safety glasses with you when you go to the quarter car wash.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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filled with fluid put 6 quarts of tranny fluid in. Straight six with auto tranny 1990 and turned it on to idle and check leaks and tranny fluid came out of the bell housing!!!!
I bet you overfilled the trans. You should have the 999 in the YJ. It's DRY capacity is right around 8 quarts but a good amount of that stays in the torque converter and doesn't drain out when removing the pan. The FSM doesn't specify the amount to refill during filter service. My method is to measure the old fluid and refill that amount and then start the engine and shift through all the gear positions and then check the dipstick and add as required. If you overfill, it may have puked some excess out of the vent hole that is behind the converter and above the input shaft inside the bell housing. Check your trans fluid level. Overfilled is about as bad as under filled as it foams up, heats up, and pukes more out the vent and can cause internal damage as the foam/bubbles don't pressurize or lubricate properly.

You are going to have to clean and track down the oil leak. A malfunctioning PCV system causes blowby to pressurize the crankcase. This will cause oil to push past even good seals and gaskets. Make sure that is good first. Then you can inspect the distributor base gasket, oil pressure sender, dipstick and valve cover gasket. All of these are common oil leak areas. The PCV is important as bad PCV will cause good gaskets to leak. Good PCV will sometimes keep bad gaskets from leaking.
 
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