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I have a ‘16 JKU 3.5” RC lift w/ CA drop brackets. 35” tires at 26 psi. The symptom I’m getting is a jerking body roll type of feeling - like when you’re changing lanes on very uneven pavement. It feels like it’s mostly the back end swinging out and fighting the sway. Like if I change lanes it will fish tail left and right, it’s very annoying. It’s not bump-steer.
Everything is tight on the suspension. The alignment was just done after the lift was installed. The symptoms were there prior to lifting. I thought it was a bad shock or sway links loose which I thought the lift would take care of. Nope, it’s still doing it. From what I can tell, the rear sway bar is like -25/30° and that’s where I’m thinking the problem is. The front sway bar is at about +10°. Can anybody chime in that has experienced this symptom? Can too short of rear sway links cause this problem
4447910
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Welcome to the forum. The sway bars need to be level. At what speed does this occur? What was your prior car?
 

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I have a ‘16 JKU 3.5” RC lift w/ CA drop brackets. 35” tires at 26 psi. The symptom I’m getting is a jerking body roll type of feeling - like when you’re changing lanes on very uneven pavement. It feels like it’s mostly the back end swinging out and fighting the sway. Like if I change lanes it will fish tail left and right, it’s very annoying. It’s not bump-steer.
Everything is tight on the suspension. The alignment was just done after the lift was installed. The symptoms were there prior to lifting. I thought it was a bad shock or sway links loose which I thought the lift would take care of. Nope, it’s still doing it. From what I can tell, the rear sway bar is like -25/30° and that’s where I’m thinking the problem is. The front sway bar is at about +10°. Can anybody chime in that has experienced this symptom? Can too short of rear sway links cause this problem View attachment 4447910 ?
have you done anything to raise the track bar on the axle side (front and rear) to compensate for your lift?

In the front, your drag link and track bar should be parallel to one another...there are aftermarket brackets you can buy to correct it...can you attach a pic of the front and rear track bars?
 

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Watching this thread with interest. I have a 15 JKU with the exact same issue. 3.5 Rubicon Express lift with 35” tires. I’m currently chasing this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This usually happens at 20mph+. This is my 3rd wrangler so I’m able to differentiate between how a wrangler should drive and how a car should drive - I never felt this in a wrangler.
Both track bars were relocated with brackets. I also have a HD top mount drag link. All the suspension geometry checks out, that’s why I’m having such a hard time figuring this one out. I know my steering box is on its way out but this just feels like it’s a sway bar or something. It genuinely feels like I’m driving with all lug nuts loose (yes they are torqued).
 

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You can try more air in the tires to rule out lateral shifting.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I tried more air. I put them at 35 and it was still present. I’m wondering if the rear sway links being too short can really cause this much jerky sway. I think I might disconnect the rear sway bar and go around the block to see if I get a more smooth sway rather than an overcorrected sway.
 

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My jk felt like when there was sway that it would abruptly stop then counter. I believe it was the track bar bushings binding then unloading, I upgraded to a core 4x4 tier 3 track bar and it fixed the problem.
 
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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
My jk felt like when there was sway that it would abruptly stop then counter. I believe it was the track bar bushings binding then unloading, I upgraded to a core 4x4 tier 3 track bar and it fixed the problem.
That makes a lot of sense. I have an adjustable track bar that I want to install but am lazy. I guess I will install it and see how it drives.
Did you upgrade just the front track bar or both front and rear?

Edit: I meant to also ask if the counteracting force was diagonally, like from the LR corner to the RF corner? It’s not just normal side to side, it’s a criss cross sorta thing.
 

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While that rear sway bar angle isn't optimal, it's not causing what you are feeling...

It looks like stock control arms... It's possible that between the stock track bar bushings and the stock control arm bushings, you are "loose". They do wear out, but usually after 7-8 years. The rest of the suspension looks new, so I would start with the track bars. Get something with a premium joint in it, like the Core4x4 bars.
 
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That makes a lot of sense. I have an adjustable track bar that I want to install but am lazy. I guess I will install it and see how it drives.
Did you upgrade just the front track bar or both front and rear?

Edit: I meant to also ask if the counteracting force was diagonally, like from the LR corner to the RF corner? It’s not just normal side to side, it’s a criss cross sorta thing.
Both are upgraded but the rear is the one that made a difference.
 
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Both are upgraded but the rear is the one that made a difference.
Mine were all done at once so hard to tell exactly what did what... But @bobchase did a rear bar by itself and said that even his wife in the passenger seat noticed a difference right away.
 

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Mine were all done at once so hard to tell exactly what did what... But @bobchase did a rear bar by itself and said that even his wife in the passenger seat noticed a difference right away.
so probably not a very helpful data point but I replaced my front with a Metalcloak adjustable when I went through and replaced all the arms and steering components...all of this was front only and I haven’t touched the back yet. I upgraded to Teraflex HD ball joints at the same time lol...

The 2” rancho lift I installed fixed the body roll issue I was having about a year before the above upgrades so mine wasn’t doing anything near what the OP was experiencing. The reason for me doing this is so I know what I have in the Jeep...the improvements in ride and handling so far are incredible but because of the timing of doing all the work at the same time makes it impossible to attribute the improvement to anything in particular.

Told ya it wouldn’t be that helpful 😂
 

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Discussion Starter #14
so probably not a very helpful data point but I replaced my front with a Metalcloak adjustable when I went through and replaced all the arms and steering components...all of this was front only and I haven’t touched the back yet. I upgraded to Teraflex HD ball joints at the same time lol...

The 2” rancho lift I installed fixed the body roll issue I was having about a year before the above upgrades so mine wasn’t doing anything near what the OP was experiencing. The reason for me doing this is so I know what I have in the Jeep...the improvements in ride and handling so far are incredible but because of the timing of doing all the work at the same time makes it impossible to attribute the improvement to anything in particular.

Told ya it wouldn’t be that helpful 😂
I appreciate the rundown, though. I'm starting to think I'm going to need new control arms but they're $$$$$$.

Update: I disconnected the rear sway links, zip-tied them up and drove around the neighborhood. The sway was there (obviously) but it was a smooth sway instead of being thrown all around the cabin kinda sway. That makes me believe the CAs need tended to. I was able to check the torque on all the suspension components - one of the rear sway link's upper bolt was just hand tight. I torqued it back down along with the bushing housing (?) for the rear sway bar. I also inflated my tires to 32 psi, even though I had perfect wear and ride comfort for my liking at 26 psi. This is my first set of Grabber ATX's so I'm still getting to know them. The ride is a little on the stiff side now but not anything like before. I was able to greatly decrease the lateral jerking force and that's my main focus; it's very minimal now and I'm happy with where it's at until I can afford spending the money on a set of some good adjustable CAs. I guess my "tentative-fix" was somewhere in re-torquing the suspension, catching that rear sway bar link and increasing tire pressure but I think the real contributing factor here is crappy CA bushings that look fine but just aren't firm anymore - this is my first wrangler that I've had where it snows so I was totally unprepared for the premature failure of rubber bushings - not to mention all the surface rust I have to correct before winter. Thanks for the tips, everyone! (y)
 

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When the lift was installed did you loosen all the factory links that you did not replace and re-torque them at ride height with the weight of the jeep on the suspension? If not all the control arms and other links will have a preload on the joints that can cause poor ride characteristics.
 

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You need to do that with all the links that use a rubber type bushing, not just the ones you might replace. All the joints that use rubber bushings that flex instead of rotate should be loosened, set to ride height (let the weight of the Jeep sit on the suspension) and then torqued.
That rear sway bar needs longer links for sure. I am doubtful that is your issue, but that is clearly an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The suspension components were torqued with the Jeep on the ground. I even jumped on the bumpers to have everything seat where it should before torquing everything down. I can definitely loosen them all up and tighten them back down but I doubt that will change much. It's a free fix if it does work, though.
 

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Did your lift not include longer rear sway bar links? Or did it include links that were on the short side? That seems like a pretty basic requirement of a lift, adjusting the sway bar angles.
This is why I don't put cheap suspension on our Jeep.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Did your lift not include longer rear sway bar links? Or did it include links that were on the short side? That seems like a pretty basic requirement of a lift, adjusting the sway bar angles.
This is why I don't put cheap suspension on our Jeep.
It included longer links for the rear and the original rear links should've been moved to the front. The new links were about half an inch longer than the original rear links. Since the difference wasn't much, I just put the longer supplied links on the front and left the rear links alone. I knew I'd be replacing all the links for quick disconnects so that's why I did what I did.

The whole "cheap suspension" thing is all relative for the intended purpose of the Jeep - I don't do heavy articulation type wheeling so opting for a cheaper lift is cost effective. If I were rock crawling every weekend I would definitely be installing a better suspension but I'm not rock crawling so I'm happy with the cost to performance ratio. :)
 

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It included longer links for the rear and the original rear links should've been moved to the front. The new links were about half an inch longer than the original rear links. Since the difference wasn't much, I just put the longer supplied links on the front and left the rear links alone. I knew I'd be replacing all the links for quick disconnects so that's why I did what I did.

The whole "cheap suspension" thing is all relative for the intended purpose of the Jeep - I don't do heavy articulation type wheeling so opting for a cheaper lift is cost effective. If I were rock crawling every weekend I would definitely be installing a better suspension but I'm not rock crawling so I'm happy with the cost to performance ratio. :)
Better suspension isn't so much about crawling through the rocks, it is about better handling on the road. Even a cheap suspension will work OK in the rocks, Sure, a high dollar suspension may give you better articulation. But it is really on the road where the difference between cheap suspension and good suspension shines. The difference in suspension is usually more obvious on the road than off.
Again, the quality of your suspension has a direct relationship to the quality of how well your Jeep drives down the road. It is, after all, the suspension.

Also, odd that a 3.5" lift would only include rear links that are a half inch longer than stock. The links should have been about as much longer than stock as the suspension lifted the rear. It should have been a direct one to one difference.
If the rear links are too short the rear sway bar is not operating in its intended range of operation. The sway bar and the link should be pretty much perpendicular to each other at ride height. Also, if the sway bar is angled too far down it is possible that the link could flip if the suspension extends too far. And that will be an instant bad day.
 
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