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Discussion Starter #1
I have a pretty good idea of the tread design I think I’d like. Is there a central reference source to shop by tread pattern?
Is there a general preference for either symmetrical or asymmetrical tread patterns?
I’ve noticed that farm tractors and Grand Prix rain tires use a chevron tread pattern to pump mud or water to each tire’s edge.
I’ve noticed that asymmetrical tires use half chevrons but they face opposite directions near the tires’ edges, as though to push water to the same side of the VEHICLE, usually to the right
Being the commie patriot that I am, I could join the movement to spray water off to the right of the roadway for the good of the many (even though that water thrust might drift oncoming cars together), but I’ve seen asymmetric tread patterns that would seem to flush water to the LEFT, and my sacrificing symmetry can’t fight THAT.
I really don’t get that. Shouldn’t they be mirror images of each other such that there’d be right side and left side asymmetricals so that, as a pair, they would have symmetry so that water spray would be equalized across the vehicle?
So, does anyone care about tire symmetry, or is the science of tire treads so primitive and tread life so long that it’s more productive to focus on the experience of others than to dwell on the science of tread design? Wouldn’t a water-pumping design also work well in some sand at some speeds? Or is emphasizing rain handling compromising other performance too much?
I’m thinking that asymmetricals are 85% as good as symmetricals going forward, but they’re 85% BETTER in reverse?
WXman?
-storm
 

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I imagine that symmetrical and asymmetrical will work equally as well as long as the tread design forces water out from underneath the tire. There are symmetrical tires that trap water and lead to hydroplane. I am more concerned with mud than rain, and for my uses I like an asymmetrical tread.
 

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I'm personally a symmetrical tread design guy ONLY. Symmetrical treads pull just as hard in reverse as they do in forward gears, they wear better, and you can also rotate them on a normal schedule so that they see use at all 4 positions over the life of the tire.

The ONLY time I would ever run an asymmetrical tread such as the Goodyear MTR-K is if it was on a toy that saw 95% offroad use.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rotating Symmetricals

Thanks, WXman. Kind of what I was thinking.


...you can also rotate them on a normal schedule so that they see use at all 4 positions over the life of the tire...
?

I guess I was thinking of unidirectional symmetricals. Or are you talking about flipping them on the rims (remounting) when it's time to switch sides?
 

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I'm personally a symmetrical tread design guy ONLY. Symmetrical treads pull just as hard in reverse as they do in forward gears, they wear better, and you can also rotate them on a normal schedule so that they see use at all 4 positions over the life of the tire.

The ONLY time I would ever run an asymmetrical tread such as the Goodyear MTR-K is if it was on a toy that saw 95% offroad use.
I disagree with "pulling harder". Rockcrawler guys that use boggers mount them backwards on purpose. They are grippier that way.

I have never seen anyone have a problem going in reverse on the trail with directional tires.
 

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If you notice...a lot of the guys that run tires like the Mickey Thompson Baja Claws will run the fronts one direction and the rears in the opposite direction. They do this because the tires won't pull as hard in reverse as they will forward...so by flipping one end around at least they minimize the problem.

I like symmetrical treads like the Duratrac for example because you can get the same pulling power in any position around the vehicle without dismounting and turning the tire around.
 
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