Jeep Wrangler Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
sdv
This is my first post so it may not be great but hear it goes. I am of course looking to lift my jeep and put on 35's for a bit more clearance on trails. I bottomed out more than once. I know there is tons of info out on this forum, but thats also the issue; there is tons of info. I read a couple of threads including:
http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/lifting-in-steps-221119.html

SO far I have a Smitty XRC front bumper with a winch. When I put it on, it sagged the front so I put 2 inch spacers to compensate and level my jeep.

What I want to do is put on a lift kit when I replace my tires and just buy 35" at that time.

Questions:

1.Since the front sagged, I do not know if I need to buy a stronger spring to compensate for the extra front weight?
2. I know I should buy new rims to fit tires and I also know I should buy a rear holder/bumper to hold the heavier tire. Since I cant afford to do it all at once, is there a way to maximize my purchases over time? For instance, maybe I do not buy the back bumper and rims and just start with a solid lift. But since it all works together, I want to sort out a way to buy good enough 35" tires that go with a lift then get a bumper later maybe hold off on rims until I actually go through the next set?

This may not be possible and I need to do it all at once.. But just hopeful and while there is tons of info, it is damn confusing.

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
From stock I installed a TF 2.5" lift and drove it for 6 months while I saved. Then I bought 35's, rims, rear bumper and tire carrier at the same time....thank you tax return. My rear saggs from all the extra weight so I just bought TF 2" coil spacers to make up for that.
Unless you have a ton of money, do it in stages. It is more exciting that way. Always looking forward to the next thing you want to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,119 Posts
Why do it in stages? Plan it out, budget. Then save until you can do it all or... get a loan and do it all. Hell loans are like 2%, 3%, 4%. Just do not use a credit card.

Where in the plan you above are you going to address driveline issues.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,970 Posts
Hi all,
sdv
This is my first post so it may not be great but hear it goes. I am of course looking to lift my jeep and put on 35's for a bit more clearance on trails. I bottomed out more than once. I know there is tons of info out on this forum, but thats also the issue; there is tons of info. I read a couple of threads including:
http://www.wranglerforum.com/f274/lifting-in-steps-221119.html

SO far I have a Smitty XRC front bumper with a winch. When I put it on, it sagged the front so I put 2 inch spacers to compensate and level my jeep.

What I want to do is put on a lift kit when I replace my tires and just buy 35" at that time.

Questions:

1.Since the front sagged, I do not know if I need to buy a stronger spring to compensate for the extra front weight?
2. I know I should buy new rims to fit tires and I also know I should buy a rear holder/bumper to hold the heavier tire. Since I cant afford to do it all at once, is there a way to maximize my purchases over time? For instance, maybe I do not buy the back bumper and rims and just start with a solid lift. But since it all works together, I want to sort out a way to buy good enough 35" tires that go with a lift then get a bumper later maybe hold off on rims until I actually go through the next set?

This may not be possible and I need to do it all at once.. But just hopeful and while there is tons of info, it is damn confusing.

Thanks in advance.
Why do it in stages? Plan it out, budget. Then save until you can do it all or... get a loan and do it all. Hell loans are like 2%, 3%, 4%. Just do not use a credit card.

Where in the plan you above are you going to address driveline issues.

The above post is good advice.

I've been happy with the plan we took on the wife's '16 Willys. I did the WF lift with rancho brackets http://www.wranglerforum.com/f202/most-popular-lift-shock-setup-on-wf-1136938.html and spacers on the factory wheels. Then this week we added 35s. IMO this addresses everything for what we planned.

NOW, part of that plan was keeping it as low as possible, to avoid driveline issues. Another part was keeping it as light as possible, light tires mean we can use the stock carrier and don't have to worry about front axle Cs/truss/sleeves etc. It will be a light wheeler, the '14 is our heavy wheeler.

So IMO make a plan, then pick a route to get there. If you're dead set on heavy bumpers/winches, tires, etc then you need to plan more lift, plan axle mods, driveline mods etc. So be honest with yourself and how you'll use your Jeep.
Good luck :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
I wouldn't use a loan for jeep mods. Mods tend to lead into more mods or even accelerated wear and tear requiring future upgrades or accelerated maintenance intervals (especially if you use the mods as intended). If you have to borrow, you really can't afford to start down that path and should just enjoy the jeep you have.

I do agree in knowing your end game (or at least targeted end game). Once you do, you can prioritize and make decisions that get you there without too many wasted efforts.

Stages can also be done to get you to incremental "end games". For instance, I still rely on my JKUR for daily driver. My current "end game" is mild but capable. I know that 3-4 years from now I may choose to build it up a bit more so when I make decisions today, they either feed into the future plan or I determine they are acceptable to discard in the future.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,902 Posts
Jeep Mods are like Vacations, Concerts or going out to eat - It's recreation and IMO You don't finance Enjoyment. You save up discretionary funds and "IF" Everything else is taken care of that matters - You splurge.
If your Life allows this measured in hours or days or if it takes months/years - So be it.
There is No end to Jeep Mods - Anyone in denial about this should REALLY NOT be financing Mods.
Jeep is a Big Toy for grown ups (or not-so-grown ups) :)

Anyway, Nothing wrong with Modding in Stages. I say Mod slowly and avoid mistakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,119 Posts
Yet most Wranglers are bought with a loan. And many are purchased "modded" from a dealership. Snow Mobiles, Boats, ATVs... all sold thru loans.

Anyone here use a Line of Credit? Home Equity? VISA for buying Jeep stuff?

Truthfully, if you plan it properly doing it all at once correctly will save you money. Agreed we all like to tinker but I think the OP is missing a bunch of stuff in his plan and will end up redoing a lot of his work.

Point is "plan the work, work the plan"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
This is an interesting discussion- both from being responsible with your finances, to how to build what you want- with an end goal.

I've seen a number of folks on different forums eventually change goals mid stream and go a different direction. That's not just for Jeeps, but can apply to a lot of "toys". I don't think there is anything wrong with that in the slightest as it allows folks to buy used parts for cheap and the one doing the changing to have fun. If you can afford to do that, it can be a slew of fun, but it takes SERIOUS $$$ to do this. Parts for these silly things ain't cheap.

Me personally, I'm a once and done type person. That is, if I'm going to modify something, I want it for the long haul and have zero desire to pull it off and start over- it's just a pain to do.

So staying on the specific topic of lifting in stages or the like, a truly "proper" lift is a good bit more than a few thousand dollars when you take into account all the necessary components to retain drivability, safety, and performance. Where this would leave me is that I'd first get something that is as close to supremely capable out of the box (the Rubicon in this case) and then all the suspension components I'd get adjustable such that you could make them work with multiple configurations.

That is, get adjustable track bars, lower and upper control arms, longer brake lines. Then you can run multiple springs and shocks and bring it back in line. And although they are hideously (dare I say stupidly) expensive, a set of flat fenders to allow for different configurations as well.

I'm not mentioning other things like axle beefing, regearing, drive shaft changes, etc., which all add up to SERIOUS cash. I financed my Jeep with basically free money for 5 years (over the course of the loan I'll pay $700 in interest) so yeah, I financed it, but like I said, it's free money at that rate and I was never at any point upside down. I don't think you can get the same level of cheap financing cash for modifications (financing $30+k at a low rate over 5 years is a lot different than a short term personal loan at the same rate).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,119 Posts
financing is hugely dependant on "do you have ANY equity"

A personal loan with the Jeep as the only collateral will be more expensive than a Line of Credit... if you have equity... as in a house. Again tho the thing to do is "plan the work"

Best comment so far... "if I'm going to modify something, I want it for the long haul and have zero desire to pull it off and start over"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,912 Posts
Yet most Wranglers are bought with a loan. And many are purchased "modded" from a dealership. Snow Mobiles, Boats, ATVs... all sold thru loans. Anyone here use a Line of Credit? Home Equity? VISA for buying Jeep stuff? Truthfully, if you plan it properly doing it all at once correctly will save you money. Agreed we all like to tinker but I think the OP is missing a bunch of stuff in his plan and will end up redoing a lot of his work. Point is "plan the work, work the plan"
Using a credit line, equity line or credit card for jeep mods is just universally a bad idea. Sure you may overcome it, but if that's how you have to purchase jeep mods, you shouldn't be doing it.

Spending more than you can afford never saves you money.

True toys get financed all the time, some can justify the monthly payment based on income and use. Many buy stuff they shouldn't just because it can be financed to them. At least with toys you can suck up the depreciation and sell the RV or boat to get out of the payment. I don't think anything looses value faster than an installed jeep mod.

Not to mention - jeep mods (when used) typically lead to other on-going issues of repair AND many NEED their jeep to get them to work on Monday. At least I can reasonably calculate the on-going cost to own and operate an RV or Boat and if it becomes disabled, I haven't compromised my ability to keep earning.

Doing jeep mods on a loan is probably THE worst financial move possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks all for the input. First off, I do not finance fun. I could not agree more. I think when I had my original thoughts in mind it was simply that the point of lifting the jeep is to put on 35's. To get the most bang for my buck, I wanted to get the 35's when my OEM tires ran out. Of course other things are more important and I am not going to do it all at once now so I was trying to find the right path. I agree about doing it in stages and it seems like maybe Ill have to do a lift and wait on tires and wheels until I have a base carrier for the back.

I love my front bumper, but yes its heavy. I know there are shorties, but they are less road safe.

As far as drivelines, I am not 100% I understand this and what to do best. I assumed I would pick a lift that would help maintain a good sense of driving, but clearly I need to learn more.

As for use.. I don't quite daily drive it, but I use it. I have other options. But I love taking it camping to places others don't go and have enjoyed some of the off-roading trails we have in Cali.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top