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Discussion Starter #1
So I just got a MetalCloak gamechanger 2.5 inch lift installed on my rubicon hard rock on 33's. It has fox 2.0 shocks for a 2-4 inch lift and has the right amount of bump stops.

I want to flex it out with a forklift before I go off-roading to make sure nothing binds. I am wondering what are things I could damage or break from all the new flex? Are there certain areas I should keep an eye on the first time I flex it out? Do I need limit straps? Will I break my electronic sway bar disconnect or should I just use the jks quick disconnects I put on?

Thanks for the help!
 

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Rubicon sway bar disconnect is fine.

Watch the rzeppa boot on the front drive shaft. It will go out eventually. Options there are a new shaft with a double cardan joint, or the Teraflex high angle joint. What year jeep? Did you get the exhaust spacers if 12+? Otherwise the slip boot in the front will rub on the exhaust crossover. Other options there are a crossover move / new y pipe, or a thinner aftermarket driveshaft.

The rear driveshaft slip joint boot tends to rub on the evap canister with a lot of flex. You can slide it over a bit, teraflex has a video on that.
 

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You'll want to watch the brake lines to ensure they are routed properly... Make sure your disconnects are set to the same length as the Metalcloak sway bar links.

How do you know your bump stops are set right if you haven't flexed it out yet?

No need for limit straps with those shocks unless you like to drive at pre-runner speeds..
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You'll want to watch the brake lines to ensure they are routed properly... Make sure your disconnects are set to the same length as the Metalcloak sway bar links.

How do you know your bump stops are set right if you haven't flexed it out yet?

No need for limit straps with those shocks unless you like to drive at pre-runner speeds..
I guess I don't know the bump stops are set right for sure, but in the install instructions MetalCloak said run 3 inches of bump stops with 33s and stock fenders

Also my jeep is a 2017
 

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I guess I don't know the bump stops are set right for sure, but in the install instructions MetalCloak said run 3 inches of bump stops with 33s and stock fenders

Also my jeep is a 2017
I would say no... 33's can go with zero bump stops and factory fenders. You would then be bump stopping only for the shocks to prevent them from bottoming out. Do you have the exact part numbers for the shocks you can post? I'll look them up and give you my recommendation. And you'll know for sure when you forklift it.

As Chitown mentioned, what did you use for exhaust clearance?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would say no... 33's can go with zero bump stops and factory fenders. You would then be bump stopping only for the shocks to prevent them from bottoming out. Do you have the exact part numbers for the shocks you can post? I'll look them up and give you my recommendation. And you'll know for sure when you forklift it.

As Chitown mentioned, what did you use for exhaust clearance?
Here are the links for the front and rear shocks I got. The specifications should be there
https://accutuneoffroad.com/product/fox-shock-07-on-jeep-jk-front-2-0-performance-series-remote-reservoir-9-6-1-5-3-5-lift-cd-adjuster/

https://accutuneoffroad.com/product/fox-shock-07-on-jeep-jk-rear-2-0-performance-series-remote-reservoir-9-6-1-5-3-5-lift-cd-adjuster/

I put exhaust spacers on. I think I bought the rugged ridge ones if that makes a difference. I also forgot to mention that I have a rock hard 4x4 engine/trans skid if that is another possible place to hit.
 

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Here are the links for the front and rear shocks I got. The specifications should be there
https://accutuneoffroad.com/product/fox-shock-07-on-jeep-jk-front-2-0-performance-series-remote-reservoir-9-6-1-5-3-5-lift-cd-adjuster/

https://accutuneoffroad.com/product/fox-shock-07-on-jeep-jk-rear-2-0-performance-series-remote-reservoir-9-6-1-5-3-5-lift-cd-adjuster/

I put exhaust spacers on. I think I bought the rugged ridge ones if that makes a difference. I also forgot to mention that I have a rock hard 4x4 engine/trans skid if that is another possible place to hit.
Ok, Those are excellent shocks... But they are very short. You can use 1" bump stops front and rear. Your Metalcloak springs can handle the next longer version of those shocks. You will have no difficulty with anything being over flexed... You will not rub driveshaft at all. In fact they are short enough that you wouldn't even have to put on the exhaust spacers.

Here's the specs I found:

F - Collapsed 15.2 and Extended 24.8
R - Collapsed 14.85 and Extended 24.45

For reference, here are the lengths of stock Rubicon shocks:

F - Collapsed 14.75 and Extended 22.75
R - Collapsed 14.63 and Extended 23.13

Edit to add Metalcloak shock specs...

Here's the shocks that Metalcloak runs with those springs:

F - Collapsed 15.9 and Extended 27.3
R - Collapsed 16.8 and Extended 27.8

With their shocks you can run 2" bump stops front and rear but you get 3" longer travel shocks...
 

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Ok, Those are excellent shocks... But they are very short. You can use 1" bump stops front and rear. Your Metalcloak springs can handle the next longer version of those shocks. You will have no difficulty with anything being over flexed... You will not rub driveshaft at all. In fact they are short enough that you wouldn't even have to put on the exhaust spacers.

Here's the specs I found:

F - Collapsed 15.2 and Extended 24.8
R - Collapsed 14.85 and Extended 24.45

For reference, here are the lengths of stock Rubicon shocks:

F - Collapsed 14.75 and Extended 22.75
R - Collapsed 14.63 and Extended 23.13

Edit to add Metalcloak shock specs...

Here's the shocks that Metalcloak runs with those springs:

F - Collapsed 15.9 and Extended 27.3
R - Collapsed 16.8 and Extended 27.8

With their shocks you can run 2" bump stops front and rear but you get 3" longer travel shocks...
Excellent info as always. How are you calculating the bump-stop needed if you don't mind me asking?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok, Those are excellent shocks... But they are very short. You can use 1" bump stops front and rear. Your Metalcloak springs can handle the next longer version of those shocks. You will have no difficulty with anything being over flexed... You will not rub driveshaft at all. In fact they are short enough that you wouldn't even have to put on the exhaust spacers.

Here's the specs I found:

F - Collapsed 15.2 and Extended 24.8
R - Collapsed 14.85 and Extended 24.45

For reference, here are the lengths of stock Rubicon shocks:

F - Collapsed 14.75 and Extended 22.75
R - Collapsed 14.63 and Extended 23.13

Edit to add Metalcloak shock specs...

Here's the shocks that Metalcloak runs with those springs:

F - Collapsed 15.9 and Extended 27.3
R - Collapsed 16.8 and Extended 27.8

With their shocks you can run 2" bump stops front and rear but you get 3" longer travel shocks...
Thanks for all your help!! I guess I need to remove some of my bumpstops. One last question though, how do I know if my shocks are bottoming out?
 

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Thanks for all your help!! I guess I need to remove some of my bumpstops. One last question though, how do I know if my shocks are bottoming out?
The easiest way to know if your shocks are bottoming out is to flex the suspension without springs installed and see if t he shocks bottom before the bump stops halt up travel.
Another way is to take small zip ties and put them on the shock shaft tight enough that they will stay where ever you put them on the shaft. Slide them towards the shock bodies and see how far towards the ends of the shock shafts they are pushed during use. If they are pushed all the way to the far end of the shock shaft you are bottoming the shock.
 

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Excellent info as always. How are you calculating the bump-stop needed if you don't mind me asking?
The easiest way to ball park bump stops is to use the delta between the fully collapsed lengths of the new shocks compared to a set of stock Rubicon shocks.

In this case, the collapsed Rubicon Front shocks are 14.75 and the collapsed Fox are 15.2 which is roughly 1/2"... 1" bump stop covers that delta.
@WillKel As for bottoming out, put a small tie wrap around the shock shaft and keep tabs on it's progress... If it ends up fully against the flange at the top of the shaft, you are bottoming out.

That will also be one of the key items you are looking for when you are fully flexed on the forklift.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The easiest way to know if your shocks are bottoming out is to flex the suspension without springs installed and see if t he shocks bottom before the bump stops halt up travel.
Another way is to take small zip ties and put them on the shock shaft tight enough that they will stay where ever you put them on the shaft. Slide them towards the shock bodies and see how far towards the ends of the shock shafts they are pushed during use. If they are pushed all the way to the far end of the shock shaft you are bottoming the shock.
Sorry if I don't use the right terminology but how could I tell if my shocks are being over extended from down travel or is that not something to worry about?
 

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Sorry if I don't use the right terminology but how could I tell if my shocks are being over extended from down travel or is that not something to worry about?
The shocks can't be over extended down. About the only thing to worry about there is either the shocks extend too far and the springs come loose, or the shocks allow the front axle to extend far enough that the front drive shaft hits on the exhaust crossover. The easy way to test either of these is to jack up the Jeep by the frame until the wheels come off the ground and then check to make sure the springs aren't loose and that there is still clearance between the drive shaft and the exhaust crossover.
If your shocks are sized for your lift you should have nothing to worry about. The most common problem is making sure you have the right amount of additional bump stop to keep the shocks from being what stops up travel.
 

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The easiest way to ball park bump stops is to use the delta between the fully collapsed lengths of the new shocks compared to a set of stock Rubicon shocks.

In this case, the collapsed Rubicon Front shocks are 14.75 and the collapsed Fox are 15.2 which is roughly 1/2"... 1" bump stop covers that delta.

@WillKel As for bottoming out, put a small tie wrap around the shock shaft and keep tabs on it's progress... If it ends up fully against the flange at the top of the shaft, you are bottoming out.

That will also be one of the key items you are looking for when you are fully flexed on the forklift.
Doesn't this value change dependant on the amount of lift (spring height)? Where is that in the equation?
 

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Doesn't this value change dependant on the amount of lift (spring height)? Where is that in the equation?
No, it does not... bump stops are shock and tire related only. They do 2 things, they protect the fenders from the tires at full compression and protect the shocks from bottoming out at full compression. Neither of those care about how high the lift is.
 

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There used to be a discussion on coil bind but I think a lot of springs can tolerate full compression now.
 

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There used to be a discussion on coil bind but I think a lot of springs can tolerate full compression now.
Yeah, really only comes in to play when using coil spacers...
 

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No, it does not... bump stops are shock and tire related only. They do 2 things, they protect the fenders from the tires at full compression and protect the shocks from bottoming out at full compression. Neither of those care about how high the lift is.
Gotchya... So if one measures the distance from the top spring perch to the spring seat plate at rest, That should be similar to the collapsed length of the desired shock + a small bump stop to prevent bottoming out? I guess I'm struggling to comprehend how to look at a lifted set-up and measure out what length shocks would be recommended. Please advise!

Thank you!
 
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