Jeep Wrangler Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've seen it written that tie rod and drag link ends should be oriented so that each end is parallel with the opposing end such that maximum articulation is possible. In other words, each opposing end is a mirror image of the other, as opposed to adjusted to be at an angle, in slight opposition, so as to prevent excessive movement of the tie rod or drag link. Wouldn't the rod/drag link ends in any state other than parallel with eachother create a binding effect at high levels of articulation? The opposing angles to limit rotation makes sense, but does it create bind and limit articulation? What say you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
I have yet to see why its an issue if the DL is down slightly . Its no different than lower control arms with Johnny Joints ,whats the difference if they are not centered . They all will rotate as needed without knowing any difference from the drivers seat. The length between each end does not change so why has it become an issue now that the Yeti steering is out " Looks " ? I have my ends angled slightly just so the DL don't hang down to far . I did that just to avoid explaining why its not perfectly level everytime some one with OE parts looks under my Jeep
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
739 Posts
I have yet to see why its an issue if the DL is down slightly . Its no different than lower control arms with Johnny Joints ,whats the difference if they are not centered . They all will rotate as needed without knowing any difference from the drivers seat. The length between each end does not change so why has it become an issue now that the Yeti steering is out " Looks " ? I have my ends angled slightly just so the DL don't hang down to far . I did that just to avoid explaining why its not perfectly level everytime some one with OE parts looks under my Jeep
Gary2; If you have your tie rod ends set up in a locked position so that your linkage will not flop you could break the studs during high articulation of the suspension. It's very important to have the ends parallel with each other so that the two joints have freedom to articulate. The best way to set this up is to have the seals evenly centered from end to end, very important.
This is also very important on the YETI linkage to have the joints evenly centered. The no flopping that the YETI has is do to the reverse pin technology that's built into the ball joint socket.
Compliant
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
53,758 Posts

·
Vendor
Joined
·
739 Posts
What if the pass side joint was maxed all the way in one direction to hold the drag link up. With the pitman joint centered how would that be different then the YETI dL with very little misalignment foward/back in the pass joint. Did that makes sense ? Lol

Does look purdy Gary haha
You will break ball studs when you put your vehicle in a high articulation condition. Your seals MUST look even on both side in order to keep pressure of the studs.
If you don't do this and have a weak Currie linkage then the studs when they bind could move the adjustment tubes because the jam nuts that they use for clamping the tube are not strong enough to hold back the pressure that the studs will give it.
In this picture you will notice how the seals should look like on both ends of the rod. You should never break a stud under this condition.
 

Attachments

·
Vendor
Joined
·
739 Posts
What if the pass side joint was maxed all the way in one direction to hold the drag link up. With the pitman joint centered how would that be different then the YETI dL with very little misalignment foward/back in the pass joint. Did that makes sense ? Lol

Does look purdy Gary haha
Ken,
When reading your post again and I see what you're asking.

When we lock the one tie rod end side motion with the reverse pin technology we compensate for that lost articulation with more articulation on the other end. If you lock both tie rods so that they can't move side to side (reducing the flop) you will try to twist the linkage when this vehicle articulation is required.
Many time this twisting force on the linkage will do one of two things, either break the studs right at the undercut of the stud or try to twist loose the adjusting tubes. Some of the weaker tubes clamps are the linkages that use Jam Nuts for locking their tubes and that's why I referred to the Currie linkage as a weak linkage in this area because they use the cheaper jam nuts on their tubes.
Compliant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Mine is not far enough off to create an issue . I understand the ends need to be able to rotate fore and aft . They are not far enough off to cause any issue.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top