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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for advice. I’ve put about 3K miles on my 2014 JKUR and after tons of research on this forum figured this would be a good weekend to make sure I’m rotating my spare in. Here’s what I’ve discovered:

Two front tires date coded 1617 about 1.5 centimeters of tread-

Spare tire coded 0614 about one millimeter more tread than front tires (never seen the pavement obviously and now it’s 5 years old)

Two rear tires coded 4216 and at 1 centimeter of tread.

All tires are BFG mud-terrain T/A LT255/75R17 on stock rubicon wheels.

Pretty obvious that the previous owner did not follow a rotation and recently replaced the two front tires before he got rid of it.

Thoughts? I really thought my next tire purchase would be an upgrade to 35’s after a 2.5” lift, but didn’t plan on it for a few months. Thanks in advance.
 

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Is your stability/traction control acting up? You could go ahead a rotate them and see if your stability/traction controls kick in, if not your probably OK. Keep track of their original location in case you need to move them back. You could also just put front to rears, visa versa, criss cross vs the standard five tire rotation. They will be noisy for a few miles after rotation. Most folks, including myself, that have run these say they need rotating every 2,500 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Haven’t moved anything yet. No traction control issues. What position chews the tread the fastest? I was thinking the front but maybe I’ve read something about the right rear? Given the age of the spare, maybe a four tire rotation would be best. Thanks-
 

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Haven’t moved anything yet. No traction control issues. What position chews the tread the fastest? I was thinking the front but maybe I’ve read something about the right rear? Given the age of the spare, maybe a four tire rotation would be best. Thanks-
FWIIW, I purchase my 2014 with 16,000 miles in spring 2017. My spare had not been on the road. I added my spare in to the rotation. I am just over 40K miles with no regrets. I will need new tires in the next 4~8k.
 

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For this reason I do not like BFG MTs on a daily/frequently driving vehicle. They just don't wear well and on a vehicle with mass appeal, they do not do well. I purchased my 10A that had new General Grabber MX3s on it. The spare was an untouched BFG MT (now 6 years old). I quickly swapped out the spare for an MX3 and started my rotation. so far everything is wearing smoothly. I'll know by years end how they are wearing, but so far they look good.
 

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Haven’t moved anything yet. No traction control issues. What position chews the tread the fastest? I was thinking the front but maybe I’ve read something about the right rear? Given the age of the spare, maybe a four tire rotation would be best. Thanks-
I ponder this question as well. I think the right rear as it will do most of the acceleration, and with the ABS module controlling braking vs traditional 60/40 valving I think does most braking too? Of course the fronts have turning but no drive under normal conditions unless 4x4. Thoughts?
 

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When I got my Wrangler 2013, Used with 80K miles it was clear the spare never saw the road. Others had been used for a good bit of mileage. I started working the spare in immediately, then when its time came up to move to the spare I would leave it down and allow one of the other tires some extra rest. :) I'm at 115K now and looking to replace all the wheels and tires.
 

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Tire rotation

When I got my Wrangler 2013, Used with 80K miles it was clear the spare never saw the road. Others had been used for a good bit of mileage. I started working the spare in immediately, then when its time came up to move to the spare I would leave it down and allow one of the other tires some extra rest. :) I'm at 115K now and looking to replace all the wheels and tires.

This is exactly what I would do. The difference in tread depth really will not make your differential spin enough to be concerned about.


I really do not understand the logic in not doing a 5 tire rotation. Tires last longer, wear more evenly, and you don't have to worry about having a spare rot on you due to old date codes. In addition, the tire has already been paid for why not actually use it.



KG6SLC aka Eugene
 

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You could go ahead a rotate them and see if your stability/traction controls kick in, if not your probably OK. Keep track of their original location in case you need to move them back. You could also just put front to rears, visa versa, criss cross vs the standard five tire rotation. They will be noisy for a few miles after rotation. Most folks, including myself, that have run these say they need rotating every 2,500 miles.
I agree with this. I would not just move the rears to the front without changing sides. I learned a long time ago from a helpful tire specialist that reversing the rotation of the tires removes the slight feathering of the tread block. This feathering is most prevalent on the rears because they have the traction.

The BFG KMs are notorious for not doing well if not rotated frequently. I rotate the ones on my Chief about every 3000-3300 miles. So far, mine have worn evenly and smoothly, and I do a custom 5 tire rotation where instead of simply moving one tire to the front from the rear without changing sides. I move the LF to the RF. However, I think your spare and the two rear tires are too far apart risking putting the spare opposite of a current rear tire at any point. My KMs are getting a little noisy at this point (less than 15K on them). I will probably replace them with GY Duratracs next year.

If it were my Jeep, I would just do a criss cross at this point.

BTW - while there may still be some KMs in the supply chain, they are no longer available from BFG as they no longer show up on the website. The KM3s are shown on the website, but non curently in stock. The only two shown in LT255/75R17 are KO2s and KM2s. For the last several years, the only KM size still in inventory were the LT255/75R17s for the JK/JKU. Once they changed tires for the JL/JLU, they were apparently discontinued.
 

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I know it's not exactly apples to apples but my parents had a jeep grand Cherokee years ago. They had a blow out and my dad put the full size spare on, had the blown tire patched and put that back in the spare holder. Some time that same year (can't remember how long it was) he had a major failure in the drive train. I was young enough at the time that I don't recall if it was gears or what. All I know is that Jeep sent a tech out because the dealer could not figure out the cause. They measured the tires and said there was enough of a diameter difference that it had part of the drive train in a bind. They told him to either rotate the spare in from the beginning or not at all and only use it as needed and then take it back off. I am not a mechanic so I don't know how the 4wd system in a wrangler compares to a JGC but that is what caused his problem.......
 

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on my Previous jk rubicon, I rotated 5 tires based on info here on the forum. It really didnt make all that much difference and then I had a dirty used tire/wheel hanging off the back.
Seriously...... I liked the look of a shiny, clean wheel, and new tire back there.
 

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This is exactly what I would do. The difference in tread depth really will not make your differential spin enough to be concerned about.


I really do not understand the logic in not doing a 5 tire rotation. Tires last longer, wear more evenly, and you don't have to worry about having a spare rot on you due to old date codes. In addition, the tire has already been paid for why not actually use it.



KG6SLC aka Eugene

If you're concerned about date codes then a 5 tire rotation makes sense, but tires do not "last longer" on a 5 tire rotation. You simply get more miles per purchase because of the extra tire.... but then you have to buy 5 tires instead of 4. It evens out in the end.


5 tire rotations can EASILY get all screwed up if you blow a tire and have to get a new one. What are you going to do to keep tread wear even? Replace all 5 if you blow a single tire??



Traction/stability control will not trigger because of uneven tread wear. If that were the case then jeep would be pushing 5 tire rotations. They don't.


As for fastest tread wear... normally I would say the front but jeep usually wears out brake pads faster on the rear, so I would GUESS the back.
 

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I hear soap helps with dirt. 🙂
I like getting it dirty, I like it clean when its not getting dirty. I dont like a worn tire hanging on the back of my clean, detailed Jeep.

Oh, and a good indicator of how detailed your service department is:

When they mount the rear tire after the tire rotation with the Jeep logo upside down. Yeah, it matters...... Three different dealers service departments could not return the spare to its proper location.

Details are important to me. I wont be rotating my new rear tire for these reasons.
 

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I like getting it dirty, I like it clean when its not getting dirty. I dont like a worn tire hanging on the back of my clean, detailed Jeep.

Oh, and a good indicator of how detailed your service department is:

When they mount the rear tire after the tire rotation with the Jeep logo upside down. Yeah, it matters...... Three different dealers service departments could not return the spare to its proper location.

Details are important to me. I wont be rotating my new rear tire for these reasons.

That's easy to fix - pop the center cap out, then after you remount the tire, pop it back in. When the tires are balanced, they have to pop them out anyway, and they never concern themselves to reinsert after the tire is mounted (unless you have a tire dealer like mine that actually does, and mounts the tires with a torque wrench instead of air gun).
 

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on my Previous jk rubicon, I rotated 5 tires based on info here on the forum. It really didnt make all that much difference and then I had a dirty used tire/wheel hanging off the back.
Seriously...... I liked the look of a shiny, clean wheel, and new tire back there.

I always wash the tire and wheel hanging on the back when I wash the Jeep. I even dismount the tire every second or third wash to wash the mount and TG behind it.

A while back, I was visiting a friend who maintains car washes and actually has his office at one. He does not own this car wash but maintains it and others on a contract. As we were leaving I noticed a tire cover hanging on a peg by the walk through door from the shop. It had the "JEEP" logo on it. I asked what that was from (he wants my TJ but doesn't currently have a Jeep). It seems he found in on the pavement at the blower at the exit of the tunnel of the automatic car wash. He offered it to me. Fits my LT245/75R16 tire on the back of the TJ. SCORE!
 

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I liked the look of a shiny, clean wheel, and new tire back there.
Tire thieves just can't resist them shiny unused spares in my hood. You can fool them spare tire bandits with a tire cover or some Armor all spray which will make it nice + shiney when going to town :)

This could be a good way to hide the real spare tire :) :
IMG_20190625_182555.jpg
 

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I have been doing a five tire rotation every 10,000 miles for the past 30 years, added 20% usage by including the spare every time.
 
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