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Discussion Starter #1
I've researched this some but haven't found any discussions with my specific issue so I'm looking for thoughts.

01 TJ, I6 with manual transmission, 148k miles. Most of the time, I don't notice any issues with transmission and shifting (it might be generally a little harder than a brand new clutch and transmission but feels good still). However, 2 maybe 3 times now while cruising the area I've noticed it's difficult to shift into 1, 2 and reverse. It only starts getting tough after I've driven for awhile (around an hour) and a good deal longer than it would take the engine and tranny to warm up. Shutting it down and restarting doesn't help but after it sits awhile it is back to normal again.

Does it have something to do with the tranny getting hot? My first step is gonna check the transmission fluid level (stupid that these do't have a dipstick to check and you have to climb under and remove a bolt to see if it spills out). I know the transmission is old but other than this issue, it seems to be working well.

Any thoughts would be great!
Thanks
 

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Any loud winning after that amount of driving ?

I had this same issue, turns out my transmission had about 5oz of fluid in it. So I drained it, cleaned it out with some 10w30, then serviced it redline MT90. After driving it a week with the fresh gear oil, she slides into gear WAY smoother then it did before. As well as is allot more quite.


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Discussion Starter #3
Any loud winning after that amount of driving ?

I had this same issue, turns out my transmission had about 5oz of fluid in it. So I drained it, cleaned it out with some 10w30, then serviced it redline MT90. After driving it a week with the fresh gear oil, she slides into gear WAY smoother then it did before. As well as is allot more quite.


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Nope, no noises at all. No vibrations, no grinding, it doesn't pop out of gear once in, nothing besides just harder getting in gear during these weird times.
 

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If you have the AX-15 ('97-'99 4.0L) use Redline MT-90, if you have the NV3550 ('00-'04 4.0L) use Redline MTL.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Changed out the fluid today. During the short test drive, feels about the same, maybe a little bit better shifting. Going on a longer drive tomorrow and so we’ll see. It def need it though; I’ve had the Jeep for about 2 year as and have never change the fluid and doubt it was done before. See pics and vid. Or just pics, apparently can’t post the video.
 

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I agree with you that it was time. Interestingly enough, the '03 Owners Manual has no specification for changing transmission fluid or even checking it. They recommend checking the fluid in the transfer case every 30K and changing it every 60K, and of course changing the Autotmatic Transmission fluid every 60K, but nowhere in the schedules, A or B do they even mention the manual transmission.

You also mentioned the lack of a dip stick to check the fluid level. I have driven many a manual transmission vehicle over the years and have yet to see one with a dip stick. I guess because they are semi-sealed and the fluid is a lubricant, where in the automatic transmission the fluid is not only the lubricant but also they operating agent and if it gets low, or excessively dirty it just stops functioning properly.
 

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I agree with you that it was time. Interestingly enough, the '03 Owners Manual has no specification for changing transmission fluid or even checking it. They recommend checking the fluid in the transfer case every 30K and changing it every 60K, and of course changing the Autotmatic Transmission fluid every 60K, but nowhere in the schedules, A or B do they even mention the manual transmission.

You also mentioned the lack of a dip stick to check the fluid level. I have driven many a manual transmission vehicle over the years and have yet to see one with a dip stick. I guess because they are semi-sealed and the fluid is a lubricant, where in the automatic transmission the fluid is not only the lubricant but also they operating agent and if it gets low, or excessively dirty it just stops functioning properly.
Interesting! I suppose that make sense in regards to why it's not a simple check like you pointed out; it's a closed system so unless you're seeing a leak it shouldn't be going anywhere. I was also confused as to why this is designed with the 17mm Hex rather than a socket like every other aspect. Again I suppose its just so you don't accidentally open up the transmission... But that seems suspect to me ha.
 
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