Jeep Wrangler Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have ~17k miles on my 33" duratracs. Just bought the matching spare because I was cheap and didn't in the first place. I'm due for a rotation and would love to rotate in the new tire if it's ok to do. What's the verdict on this? I would think it depends on how much the 4 tires have actually worn so far. I have not measured yet compared to the fresh tire


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,346 Posts
If you are happy with the tires, I would maintain a 4 tire rotation and put a cover on the new spare. Depending on how long you have had the tires on the ground, I would say they are about half worn, maybe a bit less. When it comes time to replace the tires, if you replace them in kind, then start with the 5 tire rotation.
 
  • Like
Reactions: u_konreaper

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,337 Posts
Depends how many miles you put on per year. If low usage I would rotate in the spare now. If you put on over 20K per year I would leave the new tire to rotate next time. Two items in tire life. Mileage and age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
17 might be ok. I do a 5 tire rotation every 3,000.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,317 Posts
Check the difference between the new spare and one of the existing tires using a tread depth gauge. Something like this --> https://store.snapon.com/Tread-Depth-Gauge-Gauge-Tread-Depth-Blue-Point--P648709.aspx

If you're only a couple of 32nds of an inch out, it should be OK. There won't be that much difference in rotation.

I use one regularly with all my vehicles. With existing tires, or when I put new tires on, I measure across the tread in several places and record the readings. Then I check them every moth or so to make sure they're wearing evenly.

If there is more wear in the center, I'll reduce pressure. More wear on the outsides means I increase the pressure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,346 Posts
Another thing to think of is this - if you like the tires you have, leave the new on as a spare. Then when you replace the ones on the ground, buy only three identical to the spare and put the best of the old tires on as a spare, with 4 matching new tires on the ground.

I did a similar item in that the tires on my TJ Rubicon when I bought it were older tires, but in good shape except for the spare. When I had my GY dealer look at them, he told me the ones on the ground were two years old and only sold at Wal-Mart (he couldn't even buy them). The spare was 5 years old and had a plug in it. Shortly after that, I had issues with the tires, and had them re balanced and rotated, but they were still noisy and uncomfortable and we couldn't get them correct. A few months later, I replaced the four on the ground and kept the best of the older tires as a spare (getting rid of the tire with the plug).

I had a similar decision to make on my Sahara with 5 brand new tires. If I were still driving 20K a year as I did before I retired, I would have done a 4 tire rotation and kept the spare pristine and covered. Then replaced on 3 tires putting the best on as a spare and the old spare on the ground. But, since I'm now only putting about 7K on the Sahara per year, I went with a 5 tire rotation. By the time I'm ready to trade, I will probably have gone through the whole cycle.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rdu-jeep

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,836 Posts
That's a good question. At that mileage I'd probably pass, and stick with a 4 tire rotation.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,791 Posts
If you can't rotate the spare into the rotation, how are you supposed to use it if you get a flat and need to use it?
I would rotate it in unless you are planning on buying new tires soon, in which case I would wait and rotate it in then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Check the difference between the new spare and one of the existing tires using a tread depth gauge. Something like this --> https://store.snapon.com/Tread-Depth-Gauge-Gauge-Tread-Depth-Blue-Point--P648709.aspx

If you're only a couple of 32nds of an inch out, it should be OK. There won't be that much difference in rotation.

I use one regularly with all my vehicles. With existing tires, or when I put new tires on, I measure across the tread in several places and record the readings. Then I check them every moth or so to make sure they're wearing evenly.

If there is more wear in the center, I'll reduce pressure. More wear on the outsides means I increase the pressure.
This is the right way to check to see if it's too late or not. The spare should ideally be within 2/32" tread depth, but that's IDEAL. You can probably get away with a slightly bigger difference, but like @0REDSOX7 said, the right rear is the best place to start it out, especially if the set of 4 has a tread depth differential of >4/32".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
This is the right way to check to see if it's too late or not. The spare should ideally be within 2/32" tread depth, but that's IDEAL. You can probably get away with a slightly bigger difference, but like @0REDSOX7 said, the right rear is the best place to start it out, especially if the set of 4 has a tread depth differential of >4/32".


Why right rear?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I too am curious why you should put spare on the right rear as the first spot? Is it simply to keep it "standardized" with the generally accepted/recommended rotation pattern that says put the old spare on the right rear, the old rears should go forward, the old right front to the left rear, and the old left front to the spare position. Or is there something special about the right rear, especially where the spare has more tread depth and you should start there? Would the left rear spot do the same thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It depends on the rotation pattern but starting at right rear usually means it will go through all 4 positions before going back on as the spare


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,791 Posts
A rotation really works best if you follow the same rotation pattern every time.
The standard pattern puts the spare at the right rear. If you mirrored the pattern and put the spare at the left rear it would work the same as long as you used the same mirrored pattern at each rotation. But if you deviate from the standard pattern it becomes harder to be sure you repeat the same pattern each time.
There is a published rotation pattern, it is not the only way to rotate your tires, but it is the best way to make sure you use the same pattern each time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
5 tire rotation

Here is what I would do. Do a 5 tire rotation now. Continue tire rotations as you normally would until the "newest" tire is slated to take the position of "spare"(that would be the 4th rotation after it was put into service). At this rotation do not put it as the spare but keep it in the rotation. Do this for the next three rotations assuming you rotate each 5000 miles. (5000 miles x 3 = 15,000). Subsequent rotations I would perform as normal 5 tire rotations.

My reasoning is this. For the record let me first state that I rotate my tires and change oil and filter every 5000 miles. Assuming a 5000 miles rotation consider the following. Let's call your previously un-rotated tire #5.

Your active tires(1 -4) now have 17000 miles on them as compared to your "newest(#5)" that has none when you begin this rotation cycle. At your next 5000 mile rotation your "spare" tire will have been resting and still has 17,000 miles on it. Your other three original tires now have 22,000 miles on them and the "newest(#5)" tire put into the mix has only 5000 miles. 17,000 miles less than the others currently active. The next time this tire is slated to be the spare it would then have 12,000 miles less that the others. The following cycle it would have 7,000 miles less. the next cycle it would then only have 2000 miles different than the other tires. Each time you rotate your tires another tire rests. When tire #5 is in it's third cycle (of NOT being the spare) all tires will have approximately the same mileage.

KG6SLC aka Eugene
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Why right rear?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
From my experience with the JK, right rear is where the power goes first and that's where there's going to be a little faster tire wear- if it's going to wear faster at all. Probably affected by overuse of the skinny pedal. Putting the newer tire in that position will give you the best chance of evening out the wear the fastest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Here is what I would do. Do a 5 tire rotation now. Continue tire rotations as you normally would until the "newest" tire is slated to take the position of "spare"(that would be the 4th rotation after it was put into service). At this rotation do not put it as the spare but keep it in the rotation. Do this for the next three rotations assuming you rotate each 5000 miles. (5000 miles x 3 = 15,000). Subsequent rotations I would perform as normal 5 tire rotations.

My reasoning is this. For the record let me first state that I rotate my tires and change oil and filter every 5000 miles. Assuming a 5000 miles rotation consider the following. Let's call your previously un-rotated tire #5.

Your active tires(1 -4) now have 17000 miles on them as compared to your "newest(#5)" that has none when you begin this rotation cycle. At your next 5000 mile rotation your "spare" tire will have been resting and still has 17,000 miles on it. Your other three original tires now have 22,000 miles on them and the "newest(#5)" tire put into the mix has only 5000 miles. 17,000 miles less than the others currently active. The next time this tire is slated to be the spare it would then have 12,000 miles less that the others. The following cycle it would have 7,000 miles less. the next cycle it would then only have 2000 miles different than the other tires. Each time you rotate your tires another tire rests. This would occur until tire #5 completes three cycles at which point all tires will then have approximately the same mileage.

KG6SLC aka Eugene

This is also pretty solid logic!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Here is what I would do. Do a 5 tire rotation now. Continue tire rotations as you normally would until the "newest" tire is slated to take the position of "spare"(that would be the 4th rotation after it was put into service). At this rotation do not put it as the spare but keep it in the rotation. Do this for the next three rotations assuming you rotate each 5000 miles. (5000 miles x 3 = 15,000). Subsequent rotations I would perform as normal 5 tire rotations.

My reasoning is this. For the record let me first state that I rotate my tires and change oil and filter every 5000 miles. Assuming a 5000 miles rotation consider the following. Let's call your previously un-rotated tire #5.

Your active tires(1 -4) now have 17000 miles on them as compared to your "newest(#5)" that has none when you begin this rotation cycle. At your next 5000 mile rotation your "spare" tire will have been resting and still has 17,000 miles on it. Your other three original tires now have 22,000 miles on them and the "newest(#5)" tire put into the mix has only 5000 miles. 17,000 miles less than the others currently active. The next time this tire is slated to be the spare it would then have 12,000 miles less that the others. The following cycle it would have 7,000 miles less. the next cycle it would then only have 2000 miles different than the other tires. Each time you rotate your tires another tire rests. This would occur until tire #5 completes three cycles at which point all tires will then have approximately the same mileage.

KG6SLC aka Eugene


We have a winner! I understood that but just never took the time to figure out how long it would take. Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top