Jeep Wrangler Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of September's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Commercial Member
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With the mods I'm planning, I want to start building up my tools. I have a pancake compressor, but I don't think it's going to drive a half inch impact wrench. Should I buy a bigger compressor or is electric versions a better bet? I like the idea of avoiding having to find a place for a 20 gallon tank.

I also want a rachet and grinder if that makes any difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
You could always do want many do and use hand tools. If you want air/power tools I think electric would work better. You can look into POWERTANK. They say you can run air tools with there setup. If you have a power inverter you can charge or run the electric. Air/power tools are great to have and make the job quicker but, just more weight to carry and can be ruined by rain or mud.
 

·
Full Size Jeep Dr.
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
Up until now, I haven't really had a place I could put an air compressor (not one that would be capable of air tools anyway), so I've made use of electric. No complaints and it works great. The one caveat is the leash. Without electricity they're useless.

I've been considering on-board air or a power tank of some sort, I just haven't made up my mind yet.
 

·
MARGARET, 10-14-51\6-1-12
Joined
·
10,296 Posts
to run air tools efficiently, you will need at least a 35 gallon tank with a 2 stage pump and at least a 3 HP motor,,, most air tools are air pigs,,


this is solely my opinion and does not reflect the views of other WF members
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,430 Posts
Sorry, in my garage. For putting a lift on, rails, rotations and other mods.
Gotcha.

Take a look at the tools you want to run and their requirements in SCFM. Then go look at the compressor you'll need to keep up with them. Keep in mind to also look at duty cycle. A 10% duty cycle means that for every minute you run the compressor, you need to let it rest for 9 minutes to cool down. So a small compressor with a high SCFM rating but a short duty cycle may look appealing but when you're actually trying to run it you'll get frustrated and grab the hand tools.

Do a serious evaluation of the things in your garage and see if you can find a good place to put a bigger compressor. Don't worry about having an outlet close. Wiring up an extra outlet is nothing. If you need to stack things over it, you can build a shelf to go over it. Just don't block air flow so it doesn't overheat. Do what you can to fit the biggest compressor you need and can afford.

If you do that and come to the conclusion that you really don't have the space, then go with electric. Get good quality ones with a couple of extra batteries so you can be charging one or two while you're using another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,917 Posts
^ that.

It is all about matching cfm load and supply. Die grinders will use tons of air, impacts and ratchets not so much. Your tank size is relative to the frequency of your D/C, the bigger the tank the longer you can use it between cycling, but the longer it will run to fill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
I personally couldn't live with out my 1/2" titanium. Look at it this way, an air compressor is an investment. Buy a good name and 2 a stage. Itll last you a lifetime. I have saved my knuckles many ah times using air compared to trusting a ratchet not to skip or head of a bolt snap off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Also, keep in mind the operating air pressure of the tools. Most impact wrenches, ratchets, drills and grinders operate between 4 and 6 CFM at 90 PSI. Like Green-Machine said, you're looking at a 35 gallon minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
to run air tools efficiently, you will need at least a 35 gallon tank with a 2 stage pump and at least a 3 HP motor,,, most air tools are air pigs,,


this is solely my opinion and does not reflect the views of other WF members
I completely agree. Watch out on voltage if you buy that 2 stage pump, they may require 220 volts which most garages don't have. That said, I use a 220v compressor and they are much stronger than the 110v systems (that I also have).
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top