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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport 2011 - 98k miles

I have tried searching the forum and google. I have called techs and had my mechanic try and try again. Any wisdom would be appreciated.

Issue: TPMS light comes on every time Jeep started. Blinks for 75 seconds and stays solid indicating fault, not low tire pressure. Low pressure message does not appear. Can't clear fault after trying multiple known solutions.

Bought Jeep new in 8/2011. Sold original wheels and tires. Bought new steel rims and 33" Goodyear Duratracs from Tire Rack, which were delivered with tires mounted on rims. No issues. Years later, I just replaced exact tires from Tire Rack due to low tread. Local gas station mechanic with Jeep Wrangler experience mounted new tires on existing rims. Drove away happy with my new tires.

Tire pressure fault came on. Thought it was typical cold weather issue. Checked pressure. All fine including spare. Typically run at 40 psi. Reduced pressure to recommended 35 psi. Drove a while. No love. Reduced pressure to 32. Drove a while. Reinflated to 40 drove a while. No love. Took back to mechanic to have him test sensors. He said all tested fine. Called Tire Rack. Tech said to put key in off position, inflate tires to max, then reduce to recommended 35, all in order to reset and reprogram sensors. No love no love no love. Just picked up Jeep with no solution. Mechanic called Jeep tech who said to bring it to dealership to have computer refreshed and remove error. Guess that's my next stop, but I am skeptical and expect the call that they want to replace all sensors for a cost of $800.

Do you folks have any ideas? It really shouldn't be this difficult, should it? :pullinghair:

Many thanks in advance for your time.
 

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I’m assuming the Jeep TPMS sensors are similar to those in other vehicles. They have a battery with an expected life of 5-6 years or so. You may have reached that point and need new sensors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The sensors came with the original wheels & tires from Tire Rack. Maybe 3-4 years old. The mechanic who installed the new tires on the wheels tested the sensors and the batteries checked out ok. No errors. All sent good RF signals. The ONLY thing that has changed are the new wheels. There were no errors before the new tires. It seems as though the sensors need to be retrained but nothing has worked yet.
 

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Most likely a WCM problem.
 

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You need to have the TPMS/WCM module scanned for faults and see what it comes back with. It has to be a scanner that can access more that basic obd2 and basic engine parameters. Sometimes the part store scanner won't do it.

Don't think you need to jump to $800 fixes just yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You need to have the TPMS/WCM module scanned for faults and see what it comes back with. It has to be a scanner that can access more that basic obd2 and basic engine parameters. Sometimes the part store scanner won't do it.

Don't think you need to jump to $800 fixes just yet.
Just spoke to my mechanic. He confirmed that they were able to scan the TPMS/WCM and nothing indicated.
 

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Does the red light flash in the dash? My 09 has been doing that and giving low pressure warning when there is nothing wrong. I used my ProCal to shut the warning off. My Pioneer NEX HU can see the tire pressures through the OBD port and they all show proper pressure. The red light sometimes comes on but I haven't had any other issues and it starts right up every time.
 

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Electronics can be a huge pain in the ass, look through posts on here where the battery tests for a charge but the Jeep won't start. So even though the sensor batteries are testing good, they could still be the issue. You could try replacing the sensors, shouldn't be anywhere near $800, or you could get a programmer and disable/lower the threshold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Electronics can be a huge pain in the ass, look through posts on here where the battery tests for a charge but the Jeep won't start. So even though the sensor batteries are testing good, they could still be the issue. You could try replacing the sensors, shouldn't be anywhere near $800, or you could get a programmer and disable/lower the threshold.
Thanks for everyone's input! The problem has been solved, and it indeed was the sensors.

I wanted to share the info I learned along the way in the hopes it will help others.

1) If there is a low pressure reading, inflating to the proper pressure and then driving a bit works. BUT, if there is a TPMS fault, where the light flashes for 75 seconds and then stays solid, there are NO tricks that have to do with inflating or deflating to certain pressures.

2) If the battery on the sensor is getting low, the TPMS tool will show the sensors as OK. BUT the sensor battery can be just low enough to not send a strong enough RF signal to the WCM.

The Jeep service department was able to isolate the two sensors that were going bad. I went to Advanced Auto to get the exact sensors that were on the other tires. Cost was about $55 each. I took the sensors to my mechanic who installed and programmed in new codes. Drove a bit and TPMS fault light went out.

Here's the last piece. All 4 tires were inflated to 40psi after the new sensors were installed and the drive to clear the fault. The computer used to test and enter the codes showed 40psi for 3 tires and 36psi for 1 tire. The spare on the back did not register since it was not in motion. This likely means that the battery on the sensor for the tire reading 36 is going bad. If the TPMS fault goes off again, I'll know it's that sensor that needs to be replaced.

I think there are several points to consider for the future or anyone having issues. 1) Most of the time the simplest solution is the right solution. I and many others involved spent countless hours trying to find the correct "trick" to fix the problem. 2) If you're replacing your tires due to low tread, like I was, replace the sensors at the same time. The sensors and the tread are likely to both last you about the same time 3-5 years. Easier to take care of both to save the headache when the sensors go bad soon after changing the tires.

Peace :worthy:
 

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also you can get oem Schrader sensors on ebay or amazon for much cheaper. I have bought several sets and all have been oem and worked great. like $55 for all 5.
 
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