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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ordered a set of LED's online because one of my incandescent rear lights had burnt out. LEDs are better, rite? rite?

So the lights are lovely actually. But they have the 'hyperflash' or fast-blinking problem (becaue the load from an LED bulb is much lower than an incandescent, and the controller gets confused).

SuperbrightLED sells a restistor pack for just this problem. So I got it, took apart the rear left housing, and installed the resistor and... nuthin. Same hyeprflash problem. I'm wondering if I've misconnected something - I tried on the other wire, but no difference.

I used the ground wire and the Yellow-and-White wire. Am I doing something wrong?

In the pic, you can see where I had it on the white-with-yellow, then tried the white-with-purple (no difference), and then re-crimped it onto the white-with-yellow. Still nada.

4521644


I'm aware of the heat problem the resister generates. I'm planning on mounting it in a way to keep it away from anything that mightmelt.
 

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Doesn't the resistor go in-line, not just tapped into it? Just guessing (I added incandescent blackout lights so my LEDs don't need to have the same draw). I think it goes in-line...but you should wait for a more informed response before cutting wires ;)
 

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The resistor should be in line. Electricity takes the path of least resistance. In fact, you have created less resistance overall if you wired it in parallel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hear ya'll saying it needs to be in-line. But every video i've seen, and even superled's installation directions, say this does not go in line. It bridges the feed and the ground wire.

See
(bookmarked to the point where he does it)

Here too

The clip on connector is a tap, it doesn't break the circuit. WHy are the videos above showing it working correctly even though what I would think the answer would be would be to put a resistor in line. What am I doing wrong?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Check for continuity at the taps. My guess is it didn't break through the insulation properly?
That's where I am now. I'm not trusting the taps right now, so I think what I'll do is open up the insulation and manually tap the wiring in and dammit, that should work :). But it's 9pm here and I have crap to do. I"ll try this tomorrow.
 

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Grab the multimeter. Check the aggregate resistance and confirm the taps by checking the voltage across the resistor. A multimeter is the tool for this job. If you don't have one, this would be the ideal excuse to get one. A multimeter answers all questions here in ~ 30 seconds; which is less time than it would take to manually strip wires and still have to guess if they've been fully tapped. (And then you'll REALLY need a multimeter if the problem persists!)
 

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if it is working correctly, the resistor should get warm to hot.
 

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My understanding is that the resistor is to emulate the low resistance of an incandescent bulb to avoid a CAN bus bulb out error condition.

The resistor should be in parallel (i.e. across the voltage source), but that may not be sufficient. The issue is that the voltage going to the lights is a pulse sequence and the LED current drive circuit sees this as the input voltage going up and down (hence the light flickering). It may be necessary to use something like a low-pass filter or anti-flicker circuit. I designed one that works with the front fogs, but haven’t tried it on anything else.
 

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if you have a Jscan or Appcar diag app, set the headlamps voltage to 13.4 or 13,6 volt
That will tell the PWM driver in the TIPM to operate at 100% duty cycle. Then you do not need the resistors
 

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if you have a Jscan or Appcar diag app, set the headlamps voltage to 13.4 or 13,6 volt
That will tell the PWM driver in the TIPM to operate at 100% duty cycle. Then you do not need the resistors
I knew that the tipm could be set for LED mode by the dealer. Is that what it is doing? Thats good to know. I tried to do LEDs for my friends 09 Ram and even with the resistors, it wouldn't work. You think that the Rams have the same logic as the Jeep?
 

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I knew that the tipm could be set for LED mode by the dealer. Is that what it is doing?
Yes it is the same. For the older models there was no such option in a factory scan tool. So you need to use the aftermarket tools to change the voltage manually.
The only drawback with LEDs in older models is that when you scan the TIPM for errors with a proper scan tool , you will see low and high beam voltage error.
This error is set due to the lower current draw. Resistors may (or may not) help with that. But error or not, everything work as should, so who cares? :)

For newer models (when the LED headlamps became available as an option) there is an option in vehicle configuration which, when set to LEDS, does basicaly the same.
Plus it has an advantage of not setting an error in the tipm, because it knows it has leds.


You think that the Rams have the same logic as the Jeep?
I think that as long as it uses the same TIPM it must be the same
 
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