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Discussion Starter #1
Looking at running some vintage military tires on my small off road trailer behind my jeep. However, I am concerned about balance, shock absorbtion (lack of), and wandering that may occur with bias ply tires.

The trailer currently has a crap 225/75/15 passenger radial and I'd like to go taller w/o going wider (or even go a little skinnier) - like a 30" by 8" wide tire that is tough enough for trail usage. The passenger radial has all sorts of slits in it and I run it around 8-10PSI...The trailer weighs less than 700# full, wet - most likely it is in the 300-400# empty. (I'll weigh it later).

Here is what I'm considering...is this asking for trouble?

I will likely get one of these as a spare (since it is so much narrower then anything else I can find)

Am I going to shake/vibrate everything on-road and bounce it to death off road? Can I run bias ply tires at low pressures like a radial?

Summit Racing : Coker Tire

Mfr Link : Coker Tire Raxion




Anyone have any thoughts or comments?
 

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I would be more concerned about the age and drying out of the rubber of vintage tires (assuming they are old). Most tires have a date code and usually are not good for more than 5-8 years (stretch) beyond date of manufacture. Tires don't have to show dry rot to be dried out. Bias tires will usually be a bit stronger in the sidewall vs. radials so your issues about wondering should not be much of a concern. Bias tires also develop "flat spots" from sitting for longer periods (trailer not being used daily)...which will cause bouncing for a while until they warm up and have been run for a bit. Date codes are usually 4 numbers, i.e., "4336". Meaning they were manufactured on the 4th day of the 33rd week of 2016..or 2006...or 1996. I would go with "G" rated, new tires made specifically for trailers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Tires would be new, from Coker tire. They have a tubeless version that is slightly larger (ok) and 1/2" wider (dang it).

For reference, box is 40x60" and 38" tall.800# would be loaded weight. I'm running a pair of 500# springs for a total spring of 1000#. 20150729_103554.jpg 20160215_175437.jpg 20150710_102359.jpg
 

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With them being new...you'll be fine and the "look" of those "old tires" tires would add to the ambiance!! Bigger tires are always better!! Maybe raise the dead weight off the tires when in storage will aid in the bias flat spot issue.
 
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