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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Replaced the water pump with new one. I had cleaned the block with a wire brush on my electric drill, put RTV (gray) on the block and on the pump with the gasket that came with the pump. After install, I had a leak around the bottom of the pump, just a drip. Went and got a new gasket, cleaned the block and pump, as before, put RTV (gray) on the block and on the pump with the new gasket. Still had a leak. Went and got another gasket repeated process, but this time I put the RTV (red) on the block and pump and let it cure for about 45 minutes, put the gasket on and installed the pump, I just hand tightened the bolts and let it sit over night, with a shop light shining on it because it was in the 30's over night. This morning I torqued them down to 10 ft/lbs. Still leaking around the bottom of the pump. Torqued them to 15, leak, 20ft/lbs still leaking. I am tired of messing with it, and need some advice, any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Stop with the RTV on gaskets. Yours is a textbook example of why not to do that.

Remove the pump. Reclean the surface. Don't use the wire wheel/drill combo as they can easily score the gasketing surface. clean completely with a razor blade and small wire brush(toothbrush sized)and finish with scotchbrite to clean metal. Then solvent clean the surface with acetone/alcohol. Make sure there are no rust/pits/cracks/nicks/gouges/raised metal on the surfaces. Flat, flat, flat.. Now, you can install the gasket dry, or, what I do is use gasket adhesive. Its available where the RTV is. You gotta be quick as it starts to dry quick and you want it still a little tacky as you bolt it down. Just a light film on the pump side to hold it in place, then a light film on the block side and bolt the pump on. Torque to spec. For best results let it cure over night, but read the directions for minimum cure time. I use the same procedure for the thermostat housing.

 

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+1 on the High Tack Sealant.

I fought a similar issue on another vehicle.

I got the High Tack Sealant in a SPRAY CAN to insure a consistent film thickness.

Put it on both sides of the gasket ... let it set a bit.

Bolted it all back together and torqued it appropriately.

NO LEAKS !!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice. I took the pump off and cleaned everything real good, applied the High Tack, on the block and on the pump, put gasket on the pump and installed on the engine. Waiting until morning for the gasket seal to cure, then I will fill with water and check for leaks. I sure hope it doesn't leak. I'll update tomorrow.
 

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I use the same method, as DRED, most good auto workers do, if it still leaks, and it should not, make sure you haven't damaged the surface of eather, and then take the pump back and get a replacement, if it was not leaking before it may be a bad remand. pump, [warped].
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I know why the leak accord the last attempt. I ran out of the new tube of gray RTV I purchased when I first started working on the pump, and used some red RTV that was in my tool box. I don't know how old it was but it never cured. When I took the pump off the last time the old red RTV had not cured, even after being applied over night. Hopefully the new bottle of High Tack will cure tonight and not leak tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
High Tack worked. After letting it cure over night, no water pump leak. But the thermostat housing was leaking. Went to Advance Auto and got a complete new housing, used the High Tack and let it cure for about 4 hours. Filled with antifreeze/water and no leak. Started it up and let it get up to operating temp. Thermostat opened fine and topped off the new radiator. Killed it and checked for leaks and had none. Went for a test drive, about 5 miles, temp held consistent at 180, got home and checked for leaks and all is good. I will let it sit over night and check in the morning, but I am confident everything will be good. I won't use anything but High Tack again. The Permatex gray I originally used did not work, it is supposed to be for thermostats and water pumps, says so on the package, that is the reason I purchased it. It cured on the thermostat housing for 4 days and still leaked. It was applied properly and cured properly, just did not seal properly. Thanks for everyones assistance, I really appreciate it. I now have a completely new cooling system, Radiator, hoses, water pump, thermosat and housing. I also installed a rubber Fel-pro valve cover gasket, so hopefully I have cured all of my leaks.
 

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Good Job!
 

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Good deal. Glad it worked out for you. Whats the status of your fan clutch?
Very important component. I got mine on Ebay. New MOPAR(delco mfg) for $35 shipped
 

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Great post!! I will get High Tack for my coolant system over haul this weekend.
 

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Silicone can be used with success however application process is extremely important.

Temperature is CRITICAL just as much as TIME for curing.

Notice the name of the product....... " Hi-Temp Red RTV Silicone "



Notice the three letters "RTV", that is extremely important.

Curing takes place in a specific time frame @ " RTV ".

" RTV " means ROOM TEMPERATURE VULCANIZING

Not sure where you are, but it is winter here .... and unless you have the product curing in a heated garage @ ROOM TEMPERATURE it probably will never cure properly.

DO NOT blame the Silicone RTV, because in reality it is an excellent product that works when used correctly.

We once built a small block Chevy motor using almost nothing but Silicone RTV in the process, except where extreme were going to be met such as head and exhaust gaskets.

Hi-Tack on the other hand is NOT a room temp product.
 

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Good advice here--and good luck!
 

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RTV is a pretty amazing product, but not all applications are ideal for its use. High temp AND high wet pressure like the waterpump and thermostat are better sealed with a gasket.

Certain aerospace RTVs can be used up to 500 degrees pressurized(dry) but require specialized surface cleaning and etching primer with post cure tempering at 300 degrees. I used this for F404 engines on the F-18 and intake anti-ice shields for predator drones. I won't use it for my water pumps.

Grey RTV is great for diff covers and trans pans and I've gotten perfect results from it. And the factory and aftermarket reusable gaskets, also.
 

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Years ago I had to replace some gaskets on a Chrysler motor.

When I asked the dealer for a part number to get them, he handed me a tube of black silicone ..... forget the part number ..... he told me " Chrysler pretty much built the entire motor with this stuff, so it's what you need. "

When we pulled various components off that motor they were in fact sealed with the black silicone. It did come with very specific instructions.

So we set about building an entire motor with that stuff .... and it worked flawlessly.

Not sure what the compound was that Chrysler had spec'd for it .... but I do recall very specific application notes.

They key is proper preparation ..... proper application.



Simply Put ---- for the home mechanic, doing work in the driveway or under the shade tree HI-TACK is the only way to go. It is the most forgiving ! ! ! !


I like to use Hi-Tack when I am short on time and need fast assembly !!!!!





:D
 

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My preferred for cooling system applications and more

The Indianhead is bomb proof.
The Gasgacinch is a little easier to remove, but works very well.
 

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IRQ said:
My preferred for cooling system applications and more

The Indianhead is bomb proof.
The Gasgacinch is a little easier to remove, but works very well.

LOVE the "Indian Head" referenc/PIC!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Is that stuff still available?

I have had a 100% success rate, using "Indian Head Gasket Shellac Compound" (not sure what the exact wording on my bottle is, as it's probably older) with EVERY Ford, in-line six that I replaced a water pump on.

I'd fine (wet) sand the mating surfaces (or file, lightly, if short on time--but usually BOTH), clean with LACQUER THINNER (my personal favorite, though no problem using "Brake Cleaner") and use the aforementioned "Indian Head" product, with utter and total confidence--and success! LOL

Thank you, IRQ, for the reference, and good memories! :)

Y-Yes
 

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IRQ,

AWESOME--Thanks!

I should have added, in my earlier post that (right or wrong) I put Indian Head Gasket Shellac (LIGHTLY) on both sides of the paper, waterpump gasket, as well as thin coats on both the pump face and engine block.

That might seem like a lot of work, or be not recommended for other reasons, but I've never had one leak, using this method and product. YMMV

Thanks again,

Y-Yes
 
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