Jeep Wrangler Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of JUNE's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm feeling like a true bone head here. I've installed a Teraflex 3" suspension lift. It came with a t-case drop kit. I understand that it's supposed to help with drive line angles and vibes. But how is lowering the skid plate helping with these issues? Since I've had the lift I've ran without the skid..... This is my first project. Any help or smack upside the head is much appreciated.
 

·
Mostly old school..!
Joined
·
12,149 Posts
I'm feeling like a true bone head here. I've installed a Teraflex 3" suspension lift. It came with a t-case drop kit. I understand that it's supposed to help with drive line angles and vibes. But how is lowering the skid plate helping with these issues? Since I've had the lift I've ran without the skid..... This is my first project. Any help or smack upside the head is much appreciated.
Hoping you mean you have ran without the skid drop, and not without the skid.

If you don't have drive line vibrations without the t-case drop, don't install it.

The t-case drop kit simply lessens the angle that the drive shaft works at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
A T-case drop is the least desirable and cheapest way to maintain (hopefully) acceptable drive shaft/drive line angles to prevent binding and vibration (and failure). Kind of a low end solution that also negates partially the reason for lifting the Jeep since it reduces ground clearance to the T-case support.

The better way, one of the better ways, is to use adjustable control arms, a CV drive shaft and a SYE (unless it is a Rubicon).

J
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,866 Posts
A T-case drop is the least desirable and cheapest way to maintain (hopefully) acceptable drive shaft/drive line angles to prevent binding and vibration (and failure). Kind of a low end solution that also negates partially the reason for lifting the Jeep since it reduces ground clearance to the T-case support.

The better way, one of the better ways, is to use adjustable control arms, a CV drive shaft and a SYE (unless it is a Rubicon).

J
An easy way to remember and illustrate it is with tire size versus belly height. Lowering the belly skid 1" is equivalent to putting 2" smaller tires on it.

Raising the belly skid 1" is equivalent to putting 2" LARGER tires on.

It may be cheap to drop the skid, but it robs precious ground clearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sadly I have been running without the skid plate. I haven't been wheeling. I'm sorry, I'm just not seeing how dropping the skid plates will adjust the drive line. I did put on adjustable lower control arms front and rear. I set those to spec, and took it to an alignment shop. For the recommended four wheel alignment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
Sadly I have been running without the skid plate. I haven't been wheeling. I'm sorry, I'm just not seeing how dropping the skid plates will adjust the drive line. I did put on adjustable lower control arms front and rear. I set those to spec, and took it to an alignment shop. For the recommended four wheel alignment.
It drops the the tcase, it lowers the driveline angles. They do help limit vibrations but they don't eliminate them, they also cause you to loose clearance, the only reason to have one is if you can't afford control arms. It's really not that hard of a concept to grasp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
You do realize that the skid plate is the only thing supporting your transmission. You need to install.the skid plate before driving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
Sadly I have been running without the skid plate. I haven't been wheeling. I'm sorry, I'm just not seeing how dropping the skid plates will adjust the drive line. I did put on adjustable lower control arms front and rear. I set those to spec, and took it to an alignment shop. For the recommended four wheel alignment.
so you're saying you completely took your skid plate off and have been driving around like that?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,866 Posts
You do realize that the skid plate is the only thing supporting your transmission. You need to install.the skid plate before driving.
If the skid plate was the only thing supporting the transmission, he wouldn't be able to drive it and it happens more often that you would believe possible. There is a hanger that holds up the exhaust on the trans mount. Now the exhaust is holding up the transmission until he puts the skid back on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,397 Posts
I can't image what that would be doing to the poor motor mounts. yikes! :beerdrinking:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top