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The Bad Guy
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23,233 Posts
The best one is the one that came stock on your Wrangler.
 

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8,554 Posts
I've seen very few on this forum who believe a CAI (or an exhaust) is worth the cost a JK. And, as I'm sure you know, if you read it on the Internet, it must be true. ;)

If you're looking for more power, a Flashpaq (if you're driving an auto) seems to be the preferred solution. With a manual, I'd say a re-gear gets the most play here on WF.
 

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Official WF thread de-railer
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3,952 Posts
I would NEVER use any CAI that uses an exposed filter element, like many CAI kits do, in a vehicle that might see any fair amount of water splashing up into the engine bay. I would also NEVER use an oiled gauze filter in a vehicle that will see a lot of dust because simple science tells you that to flow more air, a filter must also allow more dirt past it.
Looking at the factory setup, I don't see any huge restrictions. No really sharp turns and only a small section of expansion tube (the ribbed looking stuff).
Look at it form a scientific standpoint. The point of a CAI is to increase power. To do that, you go with a high flow filter and a inlet tube that is as smooth as possible and often oversized. The high flow filter WILL let more dirt past, so I'd avoid it. The tube by itself probably won't net much of a power gain and in some instances when the tube is oversized, can actually SLOW velocity. Same thing with going too large on your exhaust, it can actually kill low end power.
An engine is nothing but a big air pump. It's only going to pull in as much air as it needs to operate efficiently. Most CAI kits will often net you a couple of horsepower (do not believe the manufacturers claims, look for independent tests with dyno results) on a Jeep. They are more effective on some vehicles than others, mostly performance oriented vehicles that are choked up from the factory for whatever reason.

So, if you really feel like you have to do something, my recommendation would be a CAI that has an enclosed filter, then ditch the oiled gauze filter for a paper unit.
If it were me, I'd leave it stock. Not worth the money in my opinion.
 

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390 Posts
I would NEVER use any CAI that uses an exposed filter element, like many CAI kits do, in a vehicle that might see any fair amount of water splashing up into the engine bay. I would also NEVER use an oiled gauze filter in a vehicle that will see a lot of dust because simple science tells you that to flow more air, a filter must also allow more dirt past it.
Looking at the factory setup, I don't see any huge restrictions. No really sharp turns and only a small section of expansion tube (the ribbed looking stuff).
Look at it form a scientific standpoint. The point of a CAI is to increase power. To do that, you go with a high flow filter and a inlet tube that is as smooth as possible and often oversized. The high flow filter WILL let more dirt past, so I'd avoid it. The tube by itself probably won't net much of a power gain and in some instances when the tube is oversized, can actually SLOW velocity. Same thing with going too large on your exhaust, it can actually kill low end power.
An engine is nothing but a big air pump. It's only going to pull in as much air as it needs to operate efficiently. Most CAI kits will often net you a couple of horsepower (do not believe the manufacturers claims, look for independent tests with dyno results) on a Jeep. They are more effective on some vehicles than others, mostly performance oriented vehicles that are choked up from the factory for whatever reason.

So, if you really feel like you have to do something, my recommendation would be a CAI that has an enclosed filter, then ditch the oiled gauze filter for a paper unit.
If it were me, I'd leave it stock. Not worth the money in my opinion.
X2 I agree with Sinister , Dago66 , MTH Not worth the money or time. These filter systems cause many headaches, and in some causes " if dealership can prove malfunction of the CAI" auto manufactuer may deny any warranty work.

MY 2 CENTS

:crash: SLIM_SNOOPY :crash:
 

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1,962 Posts
A snorkel :) River Raider got my money. Only intake system worth doing- MAYBE a ponypower or two, but keeps my airs nice and water-free :) Sold- Mark W.
 

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There was a thread I ran across on my iPhone a week or so ago that was dedicated to a discussion of CAI pros/cons. It might have been posted by an administrator or moderator . . . .

Whatever the case, it looked really informative, but I can't find it anymore. Does anybody know what I'm talking about that could post a link?
 

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I snorkel is the only true cold air intake that you can get on a wrangler. An high flow "cai" in your engine bay takes in the exact same temperature ait as your factory airbox. A snorkel however takes in fresh air above your engine bay and gets even colder once you are moving!
 
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